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Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Journey to Siberia

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  • kms0902@sympatico.ca
    Hi Romuald, Would your wife remember the Siomkajlo sisters (Aniela, Joanna, Julia and Stasia) and sister-in-law (Michalina) from Tengeru ? Just wondering ....
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 4, 2007
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      Hi Romuald,
      Would your wife remember the Siomkajlo sisters (Aniela, Joanna, Julia and Stasia) and sister-in-law (Michalina) from Tengeru ?  Just wondering ....
      Regards,
      Krystyna Szypowska
      Ontario, Canada
      ------
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Monday, June 04, 2007 8:14 PM
      Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Journey to Siberia

      Hi Hania,
      These memories will stay with us for the rest of our lives. Please give our regards to Mela. She was in Tengeru with my wife and my wife and Mela chat often on the phone (for hours).
      Best regards
      Romuald

      .

    • roman skulski
      Hi All, All this talk about Dr. Zhivago and the rail travel in the Soviet Union reminded me of an incident during my forced trip to the Russian army in the
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 4, 2007
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        Hi All,
         
        All this talk about Dr. Zhivago and the rail travel in the Soviet Union reminded me of an incident during my forced trip to the Russian army in the spring of 1941. We, the conscripts, travelled in railway cattle cars with both doors closed and locked most of the time. One of the men had to urinate, so he used a knot hole in the door to do it. As he was relieving himself someone shouted " be careful Wacek, don't hit a telephone post". Everyone burst laughing.
         
        Roman S.
         


        romlipin@... wrote:
        Hi Hania,
        These memories will stay with us for the rest of our lives. Please give our regards to Mela. She was in Tengeru with my wife and my wife and Mela chat often on the phone (for hours).
        Best regards
        Romuald
        ---- Anne Kaczanowski <annekaczanowski@ yahoo.com> wrote:
        > It's funny you should mention this Roman because a few years ago when I was speaking to people about their memories of deportation, I spoke with your friend Mela ( in Edmonton) and she of course was deported as a young child. I included her memories in my father's book.
        >
        > "One woman that I talked with, from this period, named Mela, told me how her Polish family was ripped out of their home in the middle of the night and taken to awaiting cattle cars that eventually transported them to Kazakhstan. She was a child when this happened. Luckily she survived her ordeals and eventually ended up in Canada, putting her past behind her.
        >
        > Many years later, as a young adult, she went to the theater to watch the film Dr. Zhivago. In the film they showed clips of the northern Siberian countryside, with miles and miles of blinding snow. Watching this rolling panorama of white pass before her eyes on the screen, she started to hyperventilate in her seat. She was shocked to realize that after so many years a vision such as this would arouse in her a past memory filled with fear from her childhood. Tucked into the recesses of her mind, it flashed before her eyes once again, the stark changes in countryside that she had witnessed as a child as they were being deported on the cattle cars. She had not thought about this in years. This picture was as clear to her as though she had relived it yesterday. Thirty years later, in the middle of the movie, she found herself experiencing the same emotions that had shrouded her in childhood. For a few seconds, she almost forgot she was in the theatre.. She had to
        > excuse herself from her companions and go out into the lobby for a breath of fresh air. She lit a cigarette and stayed with her thoughts for a few minutes, while she composed herself and then returned to watch the rest of the movie.
        >
        >
        > hania
        >
        > romlipin@cox. net wrote:
        > Hi Group!
        > I just finished waching "Dr. Zivago" ( I don't know how many times I watched it) and I want to drive your attention to one fragment of the film. If you want to see how we traveled to the "Paradise of the Proletariat" look for the part when the Zivagos are travelling to the Urals. It's the closest to the real life I ever saw. It is almost exactly how we went: the scene on the platform when the train arrives, when they clean the box car, the whole thing. There is only one exception: we did not have a luxury of berths.Sitting and sleeping was on your posessions. And "strelok" (guard) was outside. Another difference is that in our car there was no hole in the floor for sanitary purposes - you can imagine tha rest... The trip took almost three weeks. "Karmioshka" (soup of some sort) was once a day. Sweet memories...
        > Romuald
        > USA
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------ --------- --------- ---
        > Moody friends. Drama queens. Your life? Nope! - their life, your story.
        > Play Sims Stories at Yahoo! Games.



        Ask a question on any topic and get answers from real people. Go to Yahoo! Answers.

      • Ann Drozdowski
        My friend couldn t remember anything about her deportation to Siberia at the age of 4, but when she saw that scene of the cattle trucks in Dr. Zhivago, she
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 8, 2007
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          My friend couldn't remember anything about her deportation to Siberia
          at the age of 4, but when she saw that scene of the cattle trucks in
          Dr. Zhivago, she started to shake because it triggered her memory.

          Ann Drozdowski

          --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, Anne Kaczanowski
          <annekaczanowski@...> wrote:
          >
          > It's funny you should mention this Roman because a few years ago
          when I was speaking to people about their memories of deportation, I
          spoke with your friend Mela ( in Edmonton) and she of course was
          deported as a young child. I included her memories in my father's book.
          >
          > "One woman that I talked with, from this period, named Mela, told
          me how her Polish family was ripped out of their home in the middle of
          the night and taken to awaiting cattle cars that eventually
          transported them to Kazakhstan. She was a child when this happened.
          Luckily she survived her ordeals and eventually ended up in Canada,
          putting her past behind her.
          >
          > Many years later, as a young adult, she went to the theater to
          watch the film Dr. Zhivago. In the film they showed clips of the
          northern Siberian countryside, with miles and miles of blinding snow.
          Watching this rolling panorama of white pass before her eyes on the
          screen, she started to hyperventilate in her seat. She was shocked to
          realize that after so many years a vision such as this would arouse in
          her a past memory filled with fear from her childhood. Tucked into the
          recesses of her mind, it flashed before her eyes once again, the stark
          changes in countryside that she had witnessed as a child as they were
          being deported on the cattle cars. She had not thought about this in
          years. This picture was as clear to her as though she had relived it
          yesterday. Thirty years later, in the middle of the movie, she found
          herself experiencing the same emotions that had shrouded her in
          childhood. For a few seconds, she almost forgot she was in the
          theatre.. She had to
          > excuse herself from her companions and go out into the lobby for
          a breath of fresh air. She lit a cigarette and stayed with her
          thoughts for a few minutes, while she composed herself and then
          returned to watch the rest of the movie.
          >
          >
          > hania
          >
          > romlipin@... wrote:
          > Hi Group!
          > I just finished waching "Dr. Zivago" ( I don't know how many times I
          watched it) and I want to drive your attention to one fragment of the
          film. If you want to see how we traveled to the "Paradise of the
          Proletariat" look for the part when the Zivagos are travelling to the
          Urals. It's the closest to the real life I ever saw. It is almost
          exactly how we went: the scene on the platform when the train arrives,
          when they clean the box car, the whole thing. There is only one
          exception: we did not have a luxury of berths.Sitting and sleeping was
          on your posessions. And "strelok" (guard) was outside. Another
          difference is that in our car there was no hole in the floor for
          sanitary purposes - you can imagine tha rest... The trip took almost
          three weeks. "Karmioshka" (soup of some sort) was once a day. Sweet
          memories...
          > Romuald
          > USA
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Moody friends. Drama queens. Your life? Nope! - their life, your story.
          > Play Sims Stories at Yahoo! Games.
          >
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