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Re: Dorwatka - Siberian Labor Camp

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  • tinijoroga
    ANTONI: If you will allow me to once again impose on your wealth of knowledge, I ran into a problem I can t seem to solve. Using the proper Russian name of
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 8, 2007
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      ANTONI:

      If you will allow me to once again impose on your wealth of
      knowledge, I ran into a problem I can't seem to solve. Using the
      proper Russian name of Darovatka, I looked up the actual map (on
      www.multimap.com) and found both of the labor camps as well as the
      cities of Neya and Shary'a (THANK YOU!). But then, I realized, that
      on these maps Neya is EAST of Shary'a – yet, on a World Atlas map
      it's WEST of Shary'a!!! Yet the proximity between the cities appears
      the same so it can't be that there are two of either of these
      cities. So how can East/West be reversed? If you'd like, I can
      attach both maps for your scrutiny.

      Thanks to your guidance, I was also able to correct ,what I believe
      now, an error in my book. I was under the impression that Dorwatka
      was in close proximity to SHUYA, but it's possible that because of
      the similarity of names (SHUYA vs SHARY'A), I had the two cities
      confused. So again, I'm indebted to you! You have been an
      invaluable source of information to me!

      BOZENA - Florida, USA

      --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, "ANTONI KAZIMIERSKI"
      <askazimierski@...> wrote:
      >
      > Bozena, I am glad to have directed you further in your search.
      > You are absolutely right in your assessment of the deportations,
      camps and conditions in them.
      > I try to use description of places in a similar way they are
      described by the 'Memorial' Society and the Archives in various
      documents. In no way do I wish/intend to diminish the severity of the
      camp conditions.
      > You also said that at some time the people were allowed to approach
      local kolkhoz; this would not have been possible in lagers of Kolyma
      or steppe.
      > The modern photography shows clearly, that even today, after more
      than 65 years, Russian economy benefits from the labours of the GULag
      system in the Soviet times.
      > antoni530
      >
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