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Welcome to Ted Morawski

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  • Stefan Wisniowski
    Please welcome Ted to the group. What an astounding and moving story, Ted, thank you for sharing it with us. I always believed that it was the mothers who
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 1, 2001
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      Please welcome Ted to the group. What an astounding and moving story, Ted,
      thank you for sharing it with us. I always believed that it was the mothers
      who were the most amazing heroes of this deportation, especially as many of
      them had to take their families forward without their husbands (my own
      grandfather died in Aktiubinsk (Uzbekistan) on the train route out of
      Siberia).

      I am doubly impressed by "Kosmopolitanczykiewiczówna" (did I put the ó in
      the right place?). I think the word may refer to the unwed daughter of Mr
      Kosmopolitanczykiewicz, may it not?

      --
      Stefan Wisniowski
      Moderator, Kresy-Siberia


      > Dear Mr. Wisniowski,
      >
      > Recently browsing the internet, I noticed your advisory about the
      > Kresy-Siberia discussion group as forwarded by Mr. Ted Mirecki, moderator of
      > the APAP discussion group in the US (of which I am not a member, but rather a
      > periodic browser of its public archives). I do not know Mr. Mirecki, but I
      > feel obliged to him for this contact.
      >
      > I have today applied for membership in your group as you will undoubtedly soon
      > discover or already know. My reason for doing so is a strong feeling of
      > kinship with people who may share my past and my bleak lack of otherwise good
      > and plentiful friends who may even want to but cannot know where I came from
      > and how it happened. Underscoring of course that it is possibly important only
      > to me, but hoping that maybe some others as me as well.
      >
      > I was born in Isphahan (Isfahan in Polish) on Oct. 14, 1942. My pregnant (with
      > me) mother arrived in Iran (w Persji in family language) on one of the initial
      > transports evacuating children and women. My father did not succeed in joining
      > her since he died of typhus yet in the Soviet Union (w Rosji in family
      > language) before I was born in Iran. He was buried in a mass military grave in
      > Kermine.
      >
      > My mom was faced with the life situation of a fatherless family. A newborn, a
      > 5-yr old daughter, and her own mother as responsibilities without a husband in
      > time of brutal war and bleak prospects.
      >
      > My father was a forester (lesniczy), my mom was a school teacher, my
      > grandmother was a saint, and my sister is just wonderful.
      >
      > I am of course the fly in the soup, but I do know some of that history, I have
      > plenty of photographs from Iran, Lebanon, and England to share, and I maybe
      > may help others as they may help me.
      >
      > Some of my pertinent background. Arrived in the US in 1952 at 10 years of age
      > from England. Latter part of primary education in the US and all of secondary
      > and higher education in the US. Citizenship - US only. Nationality - US.
      > Morawski is an American name by virtue of American Morawskis. I know it came
      > from Poland. Now it is also an American name :) Be kind to me, please?
      >
      > Once worked up great sweats helping the Polish cause under Soviet (as saw it
      > and see it) occupation. Now disinterested in current Polish affairs since it
      > is their country without external brute force, and rightly none of my business
      > per my own moral requirements. Of course I continue my sentimental well
      > wishing, but I now do not have any right of even comment on their own internal
      > affairs, and that is just what I have always hoped for with regard to Poland.
      >
      > Now that I briefly and most likely inadequately farsed about who I am, time to
      > end with what I am. Worthless couple of ounces of ash for sure, but while
      > still alive and kickin' in my naps on the bus to work ... Electronics engineer
      > by early and distant history, into computers before such as compter science
      > gained needless recognition at alma maters, did things at AIAA, did things at
      > IEEE, did things at mil dot com, now in private for-profit industry in
      > publishing related to things heretofore did.
      >
      > I really am a mild and unargumentative person today. I promise to be friendly.
      > I don't flame people on the internet. I would like to join this group of
      > people likely just like me.
      >
      > Ted Morawski
      >
      > PS - Just to be informative, not in bragging but in advising of resources: I
      > think that I speak and write in the Polish language tolerably well. W
      > Szczebrzeszynie chrzaszcz brzmi w trzcine rzekla na to nasza
      > Kosmopolitanczykiewiczowna and such. :)
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