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Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Answer regarding the make up of the Polish and Russia...

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  • BBF1000@aol.com
    Dear Group, I appreciate the response to my previous E-mail regarding the Polish-Jewish relations, and I was going to write a long commentary on the articles
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 1, 2006
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      Dear Group,

       

                  I appreciate the response to my previous E-mail regarding the Polish-Jewish relations, and I was going to write a long commentary on the articles describing Jewish activities in the Communist Parties of Russia andPoland , but I think that Linda, John Ferenc and Stefan Wisniowski expressed the sentiments I was going to convey more eloquently than I would have done.

       

                  There is, perhaps, one point I should make, not to question the truth of the articles contained in the replies but to relate an eyewitness report. Hopefully such an account might be of interest to our younger members who have not personally witnessed the horrors of 1939.

       

                  Following an appeal by Colonel Roman Umiastowski on September 6, 1939 for able bodied men to leave Warsaw and travel east where new army detachment would be formed, my father gathered a few possessions and packed my mother and me into a horse drawn cart. We traveled east on roads crowded by refugees. The roads were continually strafed by low flying German planes which seemed to have full command of the air space, except on one occasion when a single Polish plane (I think RWD or Rogalski, Wigura Drzewiecki) after a vicious air fight managed to chase away three German intruders. After some twelve days we arrived in Równe ( Rovno ) just hours before Soviet tanks entered the city. They were greeted with great enthusiasm by big Polish, not Jewish, crowds lining the streets. Flowers were presented to the Russian soldiers with cries in Polish not Yiddish “Wiwat Rosja! Russia is with us, together we’ll march on Berlin !)

       

                  And why not express such joy? Few people knew about the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact that would partition Poland . The sight of Russian troops, whom we assumed to be allies, marching west towards the front was a welcome relief to the Kresy population. So it wasn't just Jews who welcomed the Soviets.

       

      Bronek Frusztajer,

      Boston, Ma. USA.

    • Eve
      Dear Bronek - We were not privy to emails of John Ferenc and Stefan, I don t think. This is the first time I have ever read the below. The great Jan Gross
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 1, 2006
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        Dear Bronek -

        We were not privy to emails of John Ferenc and Stefan, I don't
        think.

        This is the first time I have ever read the below. The great Jan
        Gross himself said the opposite in "Revolution From Abroad," before
        he changed his position entirely in his newer books. I wonder why
        his position changed. Poles have always distrusted Russia
        intensely. This is a very well known fact.

        Regards,
        Eve

        --- In Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com, BBF1000@... wrote:
        >
        >
        > Dear Group,
        > I appreciate the response to my previous E-mail regarding the
        Polish-Jewish
        > relations, and I was going to write a long commentary on the
        articles
        > describing Jewish activities in the Communist Parties of Russia
        and Poland, but I
        > think that Linda, John Ferenc and Stefan Wisniowski expressed the
        sentiments I
        > was going to convey more eloquently than I would have done.
        > There is, perhaps, one point I should make, not to question the
        truth of the
        > articles contained in the replies but to relate an eyewitness
        report.
        > Hopefully such an account might be of interest to our younger
        members who have not
        > personally witnessed the horrors of 1939.
        > Following an appeal by Colonel Roman Umiastowski on September 6,
        1939 for
        > able bodied men to leave Warsaw and travel east where new army
        detachment would
        > be formed, my father gathered a few possessions and packed my
        mother and me
        > into a horse drawn cart. We traveled east on roads crowded by
        refugees. The
        > roads were continually strafed by low flying German planes which
        seemed to
        > have full command of the air space, except on one occasion when a
        single Polish
        > plane (I think RWD or Rogalski, Wigura Drzewiecki) after a vicious
        air fight
        > managed to chase away three German intruders. After some twelve
        days we
        > arrived in Równe (Rovno) just hours before Soviet tanks entered
        the city. They
        > were greeted with great enthusiasm by big Polish, not Jewish,
        crowds lining the
        > streets. Flowers were presented to the Russian soldiers with cries
        in Polish
        > not Yiddish “Wiwat Rosja! Russia is with us, together we’ll
        march on
        > Berlin!)
        > And why not express such joy? Few people knew about the Ribbentrop-
        Molotov
        > Pact that would partition Poland. The sight of Russian troops,
        whom we assumed
        > to be allies, marching west towards the front was a welcome relief
        to the
        > Kresy population. So it wasn't just Jews who welcomed the Soviets.
        > Bronek Frusztajer,
        > Boston, Ma. USA.
        >
      • Julian Plowy
        Bronek , I read the same article but the article I read also stated that the Russian propaganda machine had sent out information to the Polish people ahead of
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 1, 2006
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          Bronek ,

           

          I read the same article but the article I read also stated that the Russian propaganda machine had sent out information to the Polish people ahead of the Russian army advance stating that they were coming to save the Polish people from the German attack. Only after they arrived did the Poles realize that it was a Russian and German farce. The few military men in the town were assembled together with the local authority and all of them were imprisoned.

           

          Russia’s fear of their last defeat by the Poles was one of the reasons Russia first wanted to make sure Germany was able to defeat Poland . Also Russian wanted both Poland and Germany to lose and many military men as possible before they entered any battle. These were some of the reasons Russia insisted that their treaty with Germany was kept secret and why they sent out false information to Poland telling them they were going to save them from Germany .

           

          Julek

          PO BOX 3099

          San Bernardino, CA 92413


          From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of BBF1000@...
          Sent: Tuesday, August 01, 2006 2:18 PM
          To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Re: Answer regarding the make up of the Polish and Russia ...

           

          Dear Group,

           

                      I appreciate the response to my previous E-mail regarding the Polish-Jewish relations, and I was going to write a long commentary on the articles describing Jewish activities in the Communist Parties of Russia and Poland , but I think that Linda , John Ferenc and Stefan Wisniowski expressed the sentiments I was going to convey more eloquently than I would have done.

           

                      There is, perhaps, one point I should make, not to question the truth of the articles contained in the replies but to relate an eyewitness report. Hopefully such an account might be of interest to our younger members who have not personally witnessed the horrors of 1939.

           

                      Following an appeal by Colonel Roman Umiastowski on September 6, 19 39 for able bodied men to leave Warsaw and travel east where new army detachment would be formed, my father gathered a few possessions and packed my mother and me into a horse drawn cart. We traveled east on roads crowded by refugees. The roads were continually strafed by low flying German planes which seemed to have full command of the air space, except on one occasion when a single Polish plane (I think RWD or Rogalski, Wigura Drzewiecki) after a vicious air fight managed to chase away three German intruders. After some twelve days we arrived in Równe ( Rovno ) just hours before Soviet tanks entered the city. They were greeted with great enthusiasm by big Polish, not Jewish, crowds lining the streets. Flowers were presented to the Russian soldiers with cries in Polish not Yiddish “ Wiwat Rosja ! Russia is with us, together we’ll march on Berlin !)

           

                      And why not express such joy? Few people knew about the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact that would partition Poland . The sight of Russian troops, whom we assumed to be allies, marching west towards the front was a welcome relief to the Kresy population. So it wasn't just Jews who welcomed the Soviets.

           

          Bronek Frusztajer,

          Boston, Ma. USA.

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