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Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Please welcome Andrew Lopianowski to the group

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  • Zosia Krukowska
    Please welcome Andrew Lopianowski to the groupHello Andrew, Thanks for posting this site. Your grandfather s experiences are an incredible story and I very
    Message 1 of 7 , Dec 4, 2005
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      Please welcome Andrew Lopianowski to the group
      Hello Andrew,
       
      Thanks for posting this site. Your grandfather's experiences are an incredible story and I very much appreciate your  efforts of getting it down in writing.  Congratulations.  I enjoyed reading it.  Besides tracing the footsteps of my mother and her family during the forgotten odyssey I am very much interested in learning more of what was happening in the Kresy region between the World Wars.   A big thank you for sharing this story.
       
      Good luck with translating the manuscript.  That's great that Zbigniew is able to help.  What a helpful group this is.
       
      Zosia
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, December 04, 2005 12:21 PM
      Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Please welcome Andrew Lopianowski to the group

      Hi Zosia,

       

      I was quite surprised to hear from someone so closeby!  Thanks for your message.  I am thinking about writing a book about my grandfather.  One was already written years ago in Polish specifically about his experience with the NKVD by Dr. Kunert in Poland.  However, it is now out of print and only speaks about one piece of his experience.  I have been working hard over the past 6 months to scan all my grandfather’s documents to computer in order to preserve them.  Going through his papers I found reports from the SOE, passports, military IDs, journals, maps, even a couple photos.  My grandfather had told my father and his brother stories from the war which in turn had been told throughout the family, the problem is they were disjointed and we had no understanding of what happened when, where, and why.  So my first goal was to write a short biography that would provide some sort of timeline.  I contacted the Warsaw Uprising commemorative society and together we wrote such a biography, and they helped to fill in the historical context.  I just finished it and it is on their website.  So if you are interested in reading a little more about my grandfather, you can find it at: www.sppw1944.org you will notice that the site is in Polish, just click on the little British flag on the bottom left, then go to “Uprising” on the left hand side, then “biographies” and there you will find his biography.  I would love your feedback if you have the chance to read it.

       

      Thanks for the warm welcome.

       

      Andrew

       

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Zosia Krukowska
      Sent: December 4, 2005 9:44 AM
      To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Please welcome Andrew Lopianowski to the group

       

      Welcome to the group Andrew!  It's interesting  to know there are a few of us Kresy members on the west coast.  The Sybiraks were indeed flung far and wide all around the world.  Your Grandfather's story sounds fascinating and I will certainly enjoy you sharing more of his story.  Sounds like you have quite a story to post for us.  Perhaps the beginnings of a book?  I never had the chance to meet either of my grandfathers since they both died during he war years.  The one who was deported to Siberia was arrested and removed from the labour camp never to be heard from again.

       

      Zosia

      Victoria,B.C.

      ----- Original Message -----

      Sent: Sunday, December 04, 2005 3:10 AM

      Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Please welcome Andrew Lopianowski to the group

       

      Please welcome Andrew Lopianowski to the group. I look forward to some interesting discussions!
      Regards

      --
      Stefan Wisniowski
      Sydney, Australia

      ------ Forwarded Message
      From: Andrew Lopianowski

      I would be very interested in talking with your discussion group.  I am curious to learn more about General Anders army.  I don’t know what you would like in terms of an introduction.  My name is Andrew Lopianowski, I live in Vancouver, Canada, and am the grandson of Colonel Narcyz Lopianowski.  I guess I’ll give you a brief overview:
       
      My grandfather was a captain in the 1st Cavalry Regiment of Kreckowicki at the beginning of WWII.  He was third in command of the regiment and mobilization officer.  When the war began his regiment formed into the 101st Cavalry regiment and fought the invading Germans before going to the Eastern border to defend against the Russians.  First they went to defend Grodno, and then they moved north and engaged the enemy at Kodziowce.  Perhaps you have heard of this battle, it was one of the few significant “wins” for the Polish in 1939.  My grandfather was in command of half the regiment and after the battle, though the regiment suffered extreme losses they managed to destroy 22 Russian tanks and about 800 infantry.  They then fled to Lithuania where they were interned at Rakiski until 1940 when the Russians invaded Lithuania.  My grandfather was taken to Kozielsk and was one of the few spared from the Katyn massacre.  He was taken to Lubianka with a select group of officers and was interrogated for several months by Col. Jegorov of the NKVD.  He was then taken to the Villa of Malachowka where the Russians attempted to brainwash a group of Polish officers in anticipation of taking over the Polish Government.  My grandfather and one other officer did not go for it and were sent back to Lubianka.  The remaining officers in Lubianka were then loaded on to trains a moved to various special camps until they were released and approached by General Anders.  That same day my grandfather met with General Anders and told him about what happened at Malachowka.  He was reinstated as a Polish officer in the army and then was attached to help form the 2nd Divisional Staff.  They moved through Persia and Palestine into Africa where my grandfather was approached by the British Secret Service.  He agreed to join the SOE but first had to go to South Africa where he oversaw a group of Nazi prisoners as they were taken across the atlantic to Canada.  From there he went to Scotland where he was promoted to Major and trained with the Ciochiemni.  In early 1944 he was dropped into Poland behind German lines and fought with the AK, slowly making his way to Warsaw with orders to prepare for the Uprising.  When the uprising broke out he took command of the Northern part of the Southern City Center.  The sector was since called “SARNA” as that was his codename with the Ciochiemni.  He had 5 battalions under him and held the sector until the surrender.  He then was a German POW until the end of the war.  After the war he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, and received the Virtuti Militari, the King’s Medal for Courage in the Cause of Freedom, and various other medals.  He stayed in the Polish corps under British command until it was disbanded and then came to Canada.
       
      I apologize for the length, but I don’t know what you want to know.  As you see, I know quite a lot about my grandfather, I recently found many of his war documents where in quite a lot of detail he explains his movements.  I also found a hand-written journal he had his officers write daily during their service under Anders.  Unfortunately, I don’t read Polish so I am slowly working with my father to make it through all these necessary translations.  I would love some pictures from General Anders army and would like to know more about their movements.  I also found a map my grandfather drew on onion paper where he planned so of the maneuvers while the army was forming still in the USSR.
       
      Well, I think I’ve gone on long enough.  Let me know if any of this might be of interest.
       
      Look forward to hearing from you.
       
      Andrew


    • Andrew Lopianowski
      Zosia, I am very glad that you enjoyed the biography. It is from people reading it that makes the effort worth while. I think it is important to learn as
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 4, 2005
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        Please welcome Andrew Lopianowski to the group

        Zosia,

         

        I am very glad that you enjoyed the biography.  It is from people reading it that makes the effort worth while.  I think it is important to learn as many of the personal histories as possible, this is where the real events of the war took place.  I plan to expand on this biography in time as it was only a short synopsis.  I have a lot more information with which I can expand my grandfather’s story.  As for the manuscript, I too am very greatful for Zbigniew’s offer to help, and I plan to send him the first part that I have scanned as soon as possible.

         

        You are right, this is a very helpful and supportive group, I am glad that I was invited to join.

         

        Andrew

         

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Zosia Krukowska
        Sent: December 4, 2005 10:28 PM
        To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Please welcome Andrew Lopianowski to the group

         

        Hello Andrew,

         

        Thanks for posting this site. Your grandfather's experiences are an incredible story and I very much appreciate your  efforts of getting it down in writing.  Congratulations.  I enjoyed reading it.  Besides tracing the footsteps of my mother and her family during the forgotten odyssey I am very much interested in learning more of what was happening in the Kresy region between the World Wars.   A big thank you for sharing this story.

         

        Good luck with translating the manuscript.  That's great that Zbigniew is able to help.  What a helpful group this is.

         

        Zosia

        ----- Original Message -----

        Sent: Sunday, December 04, 2005 12:21 PM

        Subject: RE: [Kresy-Siberia] Please welcome Andrew Lopianowski to the group

         

        Hi Zosia,

         

        I was quite surprised to hear from someone so closeby!  Thanks for your message.  I am thinking about writing a book about my grandfather.  One was already written years ago in Polish specifically about his experience with the NKVD by Dr. Kunert in Poland.  However, it is now out of print and only speaks about one piece of his experience.  I have been working hard over the past 6 months to scan all my grandfather’s documents to computer in order to preserve them.  Going through his papers I found reports from the SOE, passports, military IDs, journals, maps, even a couple photos.  My grandfather had told my father and his brother stories from the war which in turn had been told throughout the family, the problem is they were disjointed and we had no understanding of what happened when, where, and why.  So my first goal was to write a short biography that would provide some sort of timeline.  I contacted the Warsaw Uprising commemorative society and together we wrote such a biography, and they helped to fill in the historical context.  I just finished it and it is on their website.  So if you are interested in reading a little more about my grandfather, you can find it at: www.sppw1944.org you will notice that the site is in Polish, just click on the little British flag on the bottom left, then go to “Uprising” on the left hand side, then “biographies” and there you will find his biography.  I would love your feedback if you have the chance to read it.

         

        Thanks for the warm welcome.

         

        Andrew

         

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Zosia Krukowska
        Sent: December 4, 2005 9:44 AM
        To: Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [Kresy-Siberia] Please welcome Andrew Lopianowski to the group

         

        Welcome to the group Andrew!  It's interesting  to know there are a few of us Kresy members on the west coast.  The Sybiraks were indeed flung far and wide all around the world.  Your Grandfather's story sounds fascinating and I will certainly enjoy you sharing more of his story.  Sounds like you have quite a story to post for us.  Perhaps the beginnings of a book?  I never had the chance to meet either of my grandfathers since they both died during he war years.  The one who was deported to Siberia was arrested and removed from the labour camp never to be heard from again.

         

        Zosia

        Victoria,B.C.

        ----- Original Message -----

        Sent: Sunday, December 04, 2005 3:10 AM

        Subject: [Kresy-Siberia] Please welcome Andrew Lopianowski to the group

         

        Please welcome Andrew Lopianowski to the group. I look forward to some interesting discussions!
        Regards

        --
        Stefan Wisniowski
        Sydney, Australia

        ------ Forwarded Message
        From: Andrew Lopianowski

        I would be very interested in talking with your discussion group.  I am curious to learn more about General Anders army.  I don’t know what you would like in terms of an introduction.  My name is Andrew Lopianowski, I live in Vancouver, Canada, and am the grandson of Colonel Narcyz Lopianowski.  I guess I’ll give you a brief overview:
         
        My grandfather was a captain in the 1st Cavalry Regiment of Kreckowicki at the beginning of WWII.  He was third in command of the regiment and mobilization officer.  When the war began his regiment formed into the 101st Cavalry regiment and fought the invading Germans before going to the Eastern border to defend against the Russians.  First they went to defend Grodno, and then they moved north and engaged the enemy at Kodziowce.  Perhaps you have heard of this battle, it was one of the few significant “wins” for the Polish in 1939.  My grandfather was in command of half the regiment and after the battle, though the regiment suffered extreme losses they managed to destroy 22 Russian tanks and about 800 infantry.  They then fled to Lithuania where they were interned at Rakiski until 1940 when the Russians invaded Lithuania.  My grandfather was taken to Kozielsk and was one of the few spared from the Katyn massacre.  He was taken to Lubianka with a select group of officers and was interrogated for several months by Col. Jegorov of the NKVD.  He was then taken to the Villa of Malachowka where the Russians attempted to brainwash a group of Polish officers in anticipation of taking over the Polish Government.  My grandfather and one other officer did not go for it and were sent back to Lubianka.  The remaining officers in Lubianka were then loaded on to trains a moved to various special camps until they were released and approached by General Anders.  That same day my grandfather met with General Anders and told him about what happened at Malachowka.  He was reinstated as a Polish officer in the army and then was attached to help form the 2nd Divisional Staff.  They moved through Persia and Palestine into Africa where my grandfather was approached by the British Secret Service.  He agreed to join the SOE but first had to go to South Africa where he oversaw a group of Nazi prisoners as they were taken across the atlantic to Canada.  From there he went to Scotland where he was promoted to Major and trained with the Ciochiemni.  In early 1944 he was dropped into Poland behind German lines and fought with the AK, slowly making his way to Warsaw with orders to prepare for the Uprising.  When the uprising broke out he took command of the Northern part of the Southern City Center.  The sector was since called “SARNA” as that was his codename with the Ciochiemni.  He had 5 battalions under him and held the sector until the surrender.  He then was a German POW until the end of the war.  After the war he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, and received the Virtuti Militari, the King’s Medal for Courage in the Cause of Freedom, and various other medals.  He stayed in the Polish corps under British command until it was disbanded and then came to Canada.
         
        I apologize for the length, but I don’t know what you want to know.  As you see, I know quite a lot about my grandfather, I recently found many of his war documents where in quite a lot of detail he explains his movements.  I also found a hand-written journal he had his officers write daily during their service under Anders.  Unfortunately, I don’t read Polish so I am slowly working with my father to make it through all these necessary translations.  I would love some pictures from General Anders army and would like to know more about their movements.  I also found a map my grandfather drew on onion paper where he planned so of the maneuvers while the army was forming still in the USSR.
         
        Well, I think I’ve gone on long enough.  Let me know if any of this might be of interest.
         
        Look forward to hearing from you.
         
        Andrew

         


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