Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Interesting articles

Expand Messages
  • Eve5J@aol.com
    Michael: Thank you for the links. I have not read the first one yet, but I will soon. As I have said before, and I will say it again, Poles, as well as
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 3, 2004
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Michael:
       
      Thank you for the links.  I have not read the first one yet, but I will soon.
       
      As I have said before, and I will say it again, Poles, as well as Ukrainians, like it or not, who lived in Kresy for centuries are very, very mixed ethnically, and may not even be aware of this.  The blood they so much abhor may very well be flowing within their own veins.  This does not apply to most in the Group, however, since most in the Group moved to Kresy after World War I.  Let's not forget that also throughout history, Poles were a minority in Kresy.
       
      My husband's mother is Ukrainian.  Her parents were both born in different areas of Kresy and immigrated to the USA separately as teenagers.  Yet when I look at my husband's grandmother's birth certificate, which contains at least three generations if not four, (I can't remember now and don't have the time to dig it out), there are two definite Polish surnames on it.  My own Babcia who was Kresy born and bred, had at least some Ukrainian or Russian blood, and did not know this.
      It seems to me that both ethnic groups have also needed one another at different times in history, when and if they stopped fighting long enough to realize it.  As my father said, "They are all Slavs."
       
      Best regards,
      Eve Jesionka Jankowicz
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/polesingreatbritain/message/3977
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.