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Victory Parade London- British treatment of Poles

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  • romed46
    Dear Friends, There appears to be a lot of misconception and misinformation about events and treatment of personnel of the Polish Armed Forces, by the
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 11, 2004
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      Dear Friends,
      There appears to be a lot of misconception and misinformation about
      events and treatment of personnel of the Polish Armed Forces, by the
      British, at the end of the World War II.
      The important events were :

      1. July 1, 1944 - Soviet Government creates Temporary Government Of
      The Polish Republic
      2. July 22, 1944 - Churchill announces that Britain will not
      guarantee Polish borders
      3. Feb.4-11, 1945- Roosevelt, Churchill and Stalin agree to the so
      called " Curzon Line"
      4. May 9, 1945 - Germany surrenders - V E DAY ( Victory in Europe Day)
      5. July 6, 1945 -Roosevelt, Churchill and De Gaul cease to recognise
      Polish Government in London
      6. Sept. 2, 1945 - Japan surrenders
      7.June 8, 1946 -Victory Parade, London, England

      Here are my recollections of the important events.
      In the spring of 1945 I was a member of the Polish 304 Sqdn ( Ziemi
      Slaskiej) stationed at St. Eval, Cornwall. On May 9, 1945 there were
      no special celebrations. The 304 Sqdn was busy flying over the Bay
      of Biscay looking for German u-boats trying to escape to South
      America.
      On July 1, 1945 the squadron was transferred to North Weald near
      London. On Sept. 2, 1945 when we found out that Japan has surrendered
      and the war was finally over, everyone made their way to London.
      According to my diary "…..I remember going to London with all my
      buddies and drinking beer in all the pubs around the Piccadilly
      Circus, Soho and Trafalgar Square. Exchanging badges with some Free
      French soldiers, singing, climbing statues, and making a fool of
      myself together with thousands of other soldiers and civilians. I
      don't know or remember how I got back to my squadron."
      On Sept. 7, 1945 the 304 Sqdn was moved to Chedbourgh near Bury St.
      Edmunds. We were told that we could go back to Poland if we wished
      to do so, otherwise we'd have to sign up for two years service with
      the RAF. Some of the boys, including my friends, went back to Poland.
      The morale was low and there was no discipline. Some of the boys
      started black market activities, smuggling and hijacking
      cigarettes.
      One of the man would wait on the road leading to the American camp
      and would bum a ride at the back of a truck. As the truck started to
      move on again he would push out the cases, usually cigarettes, out on
      the road, and his accomplices followed in another truck and picked up
      the cases. Police and customs officials were in the camp almost every
      week but could never find anything.
      Some of the boys joined up with the British black-marketers, and that
      lead to a shooting of an Englishman by a Pole. Newspapers were full
      of it and British attitude towards Poles has changed.
      Meanwhile the British authorities created for us, at the camp,
      Educational and Vocational Training classes, from accounting to
      zoology, free of charge.
      In 1946 The Headquarters , Polish Air Force, Directorate of
      Education, in conjunction with the British authorities created
      Polish Board of Technical Studies at 5 Princes Gardens , London,
      S.W.7 , for higher education.
      I applied and was accepted, I was granted an unpaid leave from the
      Polish Air Force/R.A.F., but received a stipend of five pounds
      sterling per week while studying.
      At that time a lot of Polish boys married beautiful Polish, English ,
      Scottish and Welsh girls, your mothers or grandmothers.

      The June 8, 1946 Victory Parade in London went by unnoticed by me and
      most of my friends as we were too preoccupied with other matters to
      worry about another parade. We were glad that we did not have to
      parade or salute any more.
      If you wish to find out about the June 8,1946 VICTORY CELEBRATIONS in
      London please visit the :
      http://www.naval-history.net/WW2VictoryParadel.htm . According to
      the Official Programme Poles were invited to the parade.

      Roman Skulski - Canada
    • Dlachocki@aol.com
      In a message dated 8/11/2004 8:56:52 PM Eastern Daylight Time, romed46@yahoo.ca writes:
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 11, 2004
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        In a message dated 8/11/2004 8:56:52 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
        romed46@... writes:

        << Dear Friends,
        There appears to be a lot of misconception and misinformation about
        events and treatment of personnel of the Polish Armed Forces, by the
        British, at the end of the World War II.
        The important events were : >>
        Hi,
        Well done!!! As for myself, after five years in the Service I was glad that
        finally it was over and the life must go on. I was very gratefu for slight
        delay of my graduation from the High School and was looking forward to start a
        new life, sadly, away from home and Poland, but again very grareful for being
        alife and free. Thankful for the opportunity to emigrate and a free ride to a
        new Home. Yet, I am visiting Kresy,Pruzana,my Hometown, Polesie every time I
        have a moment for myself. Just this year I received some pictures of Pruzana, a
        parking lot, where once stood my Home, next to our beautiful Church. Yes, I am
        visiting that parking lot every day and also going to a new church here to
        thank God for looking after myself and my dear Family.
        Dezio Lachocki, Wayne, NJ, USA
      • Graham Sanders
        Thank you, Mr Skulski, for an excellent informative post! There is an interesting alternative take on this period in my father in law Wladek Wojcik s book
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 12, 2004
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          Thank you, Mr Skulski, for an excellent informative post! There is an interesting alternative take on this period in my father in law Wladek Wojcik's book Polish Spirit:
          www.grahamsanders.com/polishspirit1.htm

          gs



          ---- Kresy-Siberia@yahoogroups.com wrote:
          >
          > Dear Friends,
          > There appears to be a lot of misconception and misinformation about
          > events and treatment of personnel of the Polish Armed Forces, by the
          > British, at the end of the World War II.
          > The important events were :
          >
          > 1. July 1, 1944 - Soviet Government creates Temporary Government Of
          > The Polish Republic
          > 2. July 22, 1944 - Churchill announces that Britain will not
          > guarantee Polish borders
          > 3. Feb.4-11, 1945- Roosevelt, Churchill and Stalin agree to the so
          > called " Curzon Line"
          > 4. May 9, 1945 - Germany surrenders - V E DAY ( Victory in Europe Day)
          > 5. July 6, 1945 -Roosevelt, Churchill and De Gaul cease to recognise
          > Polish Government in London
          > 6. Sept. 2, 1945 - Japan surrenders
          > 7.June 8, 1946 -Victory Parade, London, England
          >
          > Here are my recollections of the important events.
          > In the spring of 1945 I was a member of the Polish 304 Sqdn ( Ziemi
          > Slaskiej) stationed at St. Eval, Cornwall. On May 9, 1945 there were
          > no special celebrations. The 304 Sqdn was busy flying over the Bay
          > of Biscay looking for German u-boats trying to escape to South
          > America.
          > On July 1, 1945 the squadron was transferred to North Weald near
          > London. On Sept. 2, 1945 when we found out that Japan has surrendered
          > and the war was finally over, everyone made their way to London.
          > According to my diary "…..I remember going to London with all my
          > buddies and drinking beer in all the pubs around the Piccadilly
          > Circus, Soho and Trafalgar Square. Exchanging badges with some Free
          > French soldiers, singing, climbing statues, and making a fool of
          > myself together with thousands of other soldiers and civilians. I
          > don't know or remember how I got back to my squadron."
          > On Sept. 7, 1945 the 304 Sqdn was moved to Chedbourgh near Bury St.
          > Edmunds. We were told that we could go back to Poland if we wished
          > to do so, otherwise we'd have to sign up for two years service with
          > the RAF. Some of the boys, including my friends, went back to Poland.
          > The morale was low and there was no discipline. Some of the boys
          > started black market activities, smuggling and hijacking
          > cigarettes.
          > One of the man would wait on the road leading to the American camp
          > and would bum a ride at the back of a truck. As the truck started to
          > move on again he would push out the cases, usually cigarettes, out on
          > the road, and his accomplices followed in another truck and picked up
          > the cases. Police and customs officials were in the camp almost every
          > week but could never find anything.
          > Some of the boys joined up with the British black-marketers, and that
          > lead to a shooting of an Englishman by a Pole. Newspapers were full
          > of it and British attitude towards Poles has changed.
          > Meanwhile the British authorities created for us, at the camp,
          > Educational and Vocational Training classes, from accounting to
          > zoology, free of charge.
          > In 1946 The Headquarters , Polish Air Force, Directorate of
          > Education, in conjunction with the British authorities created
          > Polish Board of Technical Studies at 5 Princes Gardens , London,
          > S.W.7 , for higher education.
          > I applied and was accepted, I was granted an unpaid leave from the
          > Polish Air Force/R.A.F., but received a stipend of five pounds
          > sterling per week while studying.
          > At that time a lot of Polish boys married beautiful Polish, English ,
          > Scottish and Welsh girls, your mothers or grandmothers.
          >
          > The June 8, 1946 Victory Parade in London went by unnoticed by me and
          > most of my friends as we were too preoccupied with other matters to
          > worry about another parade. We were glad that we did not have to
          > parade or salute any more.
          > If you wish to find out about the June 8,1946 VICTORY CELEBRATIONS in
          > London please visit the :
          > http://www.naval-history.net/WW2VictoryParadel.htm . According to
          > the Official Programme Poles were invited to the parade.
          >
          > Roman Skulski - Canada
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