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  • Peter Criswell
    Finding common thread: knitting gets hip By Kristina Goetz High resolution photos and text-only Knit1.jpg Steve Maslow, a 44-year-old investment banker, joined
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 24 10:00 PM
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      Finding common thread: knitting gets hip
      By Kristina Goetz

      High resolution photos and text-only
      Knit1.jpg

      Steve Maslow, a 44-year-old investment banker, joined "Boyz Night" at
      Knit New York in Manhattan after he lost a bet. (Ivan Karakashian/CNS)
      Knit2.jpg

      At Knit New York in Manhattan, "Boyz Night" draws a couple dozen guys
      for beer and knitting every Friday. (Ivan Karakashian/CNS)
      Knit3.jpg

      Peter Criswell explains his knitting techniques to Brian Couch during
      "Boyz Night" at Knit New York in Manhattan. (Ivan Karakashian/CNS)

      Knit one, purl one. Knit one, purl one. Then drink.

      That's the idea at Booze and Yarn, a revolving group of about a dozen
      women who take over the old leather booths at Niagara Bar in New York
      City once a week to drink and knit before the band takes the stage.
      Beginner knitters--and beginner drinkers--are welcome to join. And by
      New York standards, the cover charge is cheap: an optional $10 gets
      you all the yarn advice you can take in.

      "You don't have to give up your nightlife just because you like the
      craft," says Booze and Yarn organizer Corinna Mantlo, 24. "It's not
      brain surgery. The name was kind of making fun of other groups that
      take themselves so seriously."

      The 500 or so knitters on Mantlo's e-mail list are part of a growing
      number of young people, especially 20-somethings, who've taken up the
      age-old knitting tradition and made it their own. They bring their
      handiwork on the subway, to the airport and, yes, even to bars.
      Whether it's to imitate a favorite star's poncho or to relax with a
      do-it-yourself project, more women--and men--are filling up seats in
      knitting circles across the country. And yarn companies are catching
      on, targeting a younger demographic that demands trendy, high-fashion
      patterns.

      "You look in Barney's windows and knitted and crocheted accessories
      are all over the place," says Mary Colucci, executive director of the
      Craft Yarn Council of America. "It's an easy hobby to get into. You
      can pay as much or as little as you want. And it's also incredibly
      relaxing, a real stress-reliever."

      SoHo Publishing Co. and Lion Brand Yarn saw such market potential in
      younger customers that they've created knit.1, a quarterly magazine
      targeting 18- to 35-year-olds. With just two issues under its belt,
      knit.1's glossy fashion spreads feature what's hot in the world of
      yarn and beyond. Adina Klein, the magazine's editor in chief,
      scrambles to attend as many fashion shows as she can, and her work has
      paid off.

      "The first issue pretty much sold out," Klein says. "We didn't have
      any copies to give out at our launch party."

      The latest issue, on shelves now, features looks for the urban cowgirl
      or the sleeveless diva. Or for those knitters more interested in home
      accessories, there are patterns for barstool covers, wine bottle bags
      and even iPod armband carriers.

      The knitting trend has been popular for the past five years, she says,
      but it has taken a while for magazines to catch up.

      "Most people are just so grateful that they have a knitting magazine
      that reflects their tastes," Klein says.

      A recent survey commissioned by the Craft Yarn Council of America
      reported that 53 million American women know how to knit or crochet,
      up from 35 million in 1994. Women ages 25 to 34 are fueling yarn sales
      nationwide, the study showed. And knitters and crocheters are also
      spending more money on projects, which industry experts attribute to
      the purchase of fashion yarns--fur-type, ribbons and chenille to name
      a few--which tend to be more expensive than the old-fashioned basics.

      The trend has not escaped young entrepreneurs across the country.

      For 25-year-old Hannah Blumenfeld, knitting is part of her
      do-it-yourself life philosophy. A part-time bartender and singer for
      the punk band Terrorist Other in Cleveland, Ohio, Blumenfeld said
      young women she met at gigs started complimenting her on her homemade
      wristbands. Now, the punkers chat about their respective knitting
      projects during breaks from the loud music.

      "Knitting encompasses the whole range of who people are these days,"
      Blumenfeld says. "Everyone knows someone who knits."

      Miriam Maltagliati, owner of Knit New York, a cafe and yarn store on
      the Lower East Side of Manhattan, doesn't need a survey to tell her
      more people are interested in knitting. She has seen the wave
      firsthand since she opened her doors in December 2003. Now most of her
      how-to classes routinely sell out.

      "The stereotype is changing, and it's the knitters who are changing
      it," she says. "We have a full range of ages, shapes, sizes, the whole
      thing."

      Cait Smith opened Mabel's Cafe and Knittery in Portland, Ore., named
      as a tribute to her expert knitter mom back in Vermont, and hasn't had
      a free moment since. The store is packed with new knitters, she says,
      especially those in their 20s and 30s who rush in for supplies to make
      scarves, leg warmers and shawls.

      "People want to do something that feels good and is comforting, that's
      creative at the same time," says Smith, 29.

      But knitting is not just a girl thing. Men are joining knitting
      circles too these days, and at Knit New York, Boyz Night draws a
      couple dozen guys for beer and knitting every Friday.

      Steve Maslow, a 44-year-old investment banker, joined a recent Boyz
      Night after he lost a bet. With his tie loosened, Maslow sat at a
      large table looking over an instructional booklet on how to knit a
      hat. But even after three lessons, his first attempt at a project was
      floundering.

      "What I created was what I'd imagine a strand of DNA would look like
      after Hiroshima," he said, adding that he's getting better as he goes.
      "I can calculate bond yields in my head, but for some reason, I need
      this counter to keep track of rows," he said. But he's glad he lost
      the bet.

      "Otherwise," he says, "it never would have occurred to me to try
      knitting."

      E-mail: krg2105@...
    • Harlan Pruden
      Here is the link for the article. Thanks for bring this to our attention Peter!! http://jscms.jrn.columbia.edu/cns/2005-03-01/goetz-hipknitters Harlan On Fri,
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 25 8:34 AM
      • 0 Attachment
        Here is the link for the article. Thanks for bring this to our attention Peter!!

        http://jscms.jrn.columbia.edu/cns/2005-03-01/goetz-hipknitters

        Harlan


        On Fri, 25 Mar 2005 06:00:10 -0000, Peter Criswell
        <petercriswell@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Finding common thread: knitting gets hip
        > By Kristina Goetz
        >
        > High resolution photos and text-only
        > Knit1.jpg
        >
        > Steve Maslow, a 44-year-old investment banker, joined "Boyz Night" at
        > Knit New York in Manhattan after he lost a bet. (Ivan Karakashian/CNS)
        > Knit2.jpg
        >
        > At Knit New York in Manhattan, "Boyz Night" draws a couple dozen guys
        > for beer and knitting every Friday. (Ivan Karakashian/CNS)
        > Knit3.jpg
        >
        > Peter Criswell explains his knitting techniques to Brian Couch during
        > "Boyz Night" at Knit New York in Manhattan. (Ivan Karakashian/CNS)
        >
        > Knit one, purl one. Knit one, purl one. Then drink.
        >
        > That's the idea at Booze and Yarn, a revolving group of about a dozen
        > women who take over the old leather booths at Niagara Bar in New York
        > City once a week to drink and knit before the band takes the stage.
        > Beginner knitters--and beginner drinkers--are welcome to join. And by
        > New York standards, the cover charge is cheap: an optional $10 gets
        > you all the yarn advice you can take in.
        >
        > "You don't have to give up your nightlife just because you like the
        > craft," says Booze and Yarn organizer Corinna Mantlo, 24. "It's not
        > brain surgery. The name was kind of making fun of other groups that
        > take themselves so seriously."
        >
        > The 500 or so knitters on Mantlo's e-mail list are part of a growing
        > number of young people, especially 20-somethings, who've taken up the
        > age-old knitting tradition and made it their own. They bring their
        > handiwork on the subway, to the airport and, yes, even to bars.
        > Whether it's to imitate a favorite star's poncho or to relax with a
        > do-it-yourself project, more women--and men--are filling up seats in
        > knitting circles across the country. And yarn companies are catching
        > on, targeting a younger demographic that demands trendy, high-fashion
        > patterns.
        >
        > "You look in Barney's windows and knitted and crocheted accessories
        > are all over the place," says Mary Colucci, executive director of the
        > Craft Yarn Council of America. "It's an easy hobby to get into. You
        > can pay as much or as little as you want. And it's also incredibly
        > relaxing, a real stress-reliever."
        >
        > SoHo Publishing Co. and Lion Brand Yarn saw such market potential in
        > younger customers that they've created knit.1, a quarterly magazine
        > targeting 18- to 35-year-olds. With just two issues under its belt,
        > knit.1's glossy fashion spreads feature what's hot in the world of
        > yarn and beyond. Adina Klein, the magazine's editor in chief,
        > scrambles to attend as many fashion shows as she can, and her work has
        > paid off.
        >
        > "The first issue pretty much sold out," Klein says. "We didn't have
        > any copies to give out at our launch party."
        >
        > The latest issue, on shelves now, features looks for the urban cowgirl
        > or the sleeveless diva. Or for those knitters more interested in home
        > accessories, there are patterns for barstool covers, wine bottle bags
        > and even iPod armband carriers.
        >
        > The knitting trend has been popular for the past five years, she says,
        > but it has taken a while for magazines to catch up.
        >
        > "Most people are just so grateful that they have a knitting magazine
        > that reflects their tastes," Klein says.
        >
        > A recent survey commissioned by the Craft Yarn Council of America
        > reported that 53 million American women know how to knit or crochet,
        > up from 35 million in 1994. Women ages 25 to 34 are fueling yarn sales
        > nationwide, the study showed. And knitters and crocheters are also
        > spending more money on projects, which industry experts attribute to
        > the purchase of fashion yarns--fur-type, ribbons and chenille to name
        > a few--which tend to be more expensive than the old-fashioned basics.
        >
        > The trend has not escaped young entrepreneurs across the country.
        >
        > For 25-year-old Hannah Blumenfeld, knitting is part of her
        > do-it-yourself life philosophy. A part-time bartender and singer for
        > the punk band Terrorist Other in Cleveland, Ohio, Blumenfeld said
        > young women she met at gigs started complimenting her on her homemade
        > wristbands. Now, the punkers chat about their respective knitting
        > projects during breaks from the loud music.
        >
        > "Knitting encompasses the whole range of who people are these days,"
        > Blumenfeld says. "Everyone knows someone who knits."
        >
        > Miriam Maltagliati, owner of Knit New York, a cafe and yarn store on
        > the Lower East Side of Manhattan, doesn't need a survey to tell her
        > more people are interested in knitting. She has seen the wave
        > firsthand since she opened her doors in December 2003. Now most of her
        > how-to classes routinely sell out.
        >
        > "The stereotype is changing, and it's the knitters who are changing
        > it," she says. "We have a full range of ages, shapes, sizes, the whole
        > thing."
        >
        > Cait Smith opened Mabel's Cafe and Knittery in Portland, Ore., named
        > as a tribute to her expert knitter mom back in Vermont, and hasn't had
        > a free moment since. The store is packed with new knitters, she says,
        > especially those in their 20s and 30s who rush in for supplies to make
        > scarves, leg warmers and shawls.
        >
        > "People want to do something that feels good and is comforting, that's
        > creative at the same time," says Smith, 29.
        >
        > But knitting is not just a girl thing. Men are joining knitting
        > circles too these days, and at Knit New York, Boyz Night draws a
        > couple dozen guys for beer and knitting every Friday.
        >
        > Steve Maslow, a 44-year-old investment banker, joined a recent Boyz
        > Night after he lost a bet. With his tie loosened, Maslow sat at a
        > large table looking over an instructional booklet on how to knit a
        > hat. But even after three lessons, his first attempt at a project was
        > floundering.
        >
        > "What I created was what I'd imagine a strand of DNA would look like
        > after Hiroshima," he said, adding that he's getting better as he goes.
        > "I can calculate bond yields in my head, but for some reason, I need
        > this counter to keep track of rows," he said. But he's glad he lost
        > the bet.
        >
        > "Otherwise," he says, "it never would have occurred to me to try
        > knitting."
        >
        > E-mail: krg2105@...
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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