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Re: [KidsIslamicStories] autism challanges

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  • Naghma Husain
    Jazakallah. That was an extemely helpful reminder. ... _______________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Win 1 of 4,000 free domain names from Yahoo! Enter now.
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 28, 2004
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      Jazakallah. That was an extemely helpful reminder.
      --- ummezahid@... wrote:

      > Autism challenges
      > We are the parents of two children. One, a boy, is
      > autistic. Autism in itself
      > is a very difficult disability, which can cause
      > children and adults diagnosed
      > with it to have difficulty with social situations.
      > There are many other
      > extreme challenges that affect these individuals,
      > and their families that the
      > majority of the general public will never
      > understand.
      > Once in a while, our son has had meltdowns and
      > screaming fits like a
      > 2-year-old. Sometimes, a shopping trip proves to be
      > too much for him to handle.
      > (Haven't we all felt like that at one time or
      > another?) The mall may be crowded, or
      > noisy. Now, if he was two, this would be socially
      > acceptable, but he is 8
      > years old.
      > This, we have found, creates quite a phenomenon
      > among some people. It is
      > called being rude. We have had complete strangers
      > come up to us - as we were
      > trying to leave - they will block our way and
      > usually say something intelligent
      > like: "What he needs is a good spanking."
      > We sometimes feel that we should wear a T-shirt that
      > says, "I'm sorry, but
      > the child is autistic." This sounds silly, but if he
      > were visibly a handicapped
      > child, people would not do this, they would
      > understand. Our oldest child
      > observes these people making hurtful remarks, and
      > she does not understand how they
      > can be so mean.
      > The next time you are shopping, and you see a child
      > having a tantrum, act out
      > of compassion - not ignorance. Who knows, that child
      > may have autism or
      > another disability, or just be having a bad day.
      > Either way, I'm sure the parents
      > would appreciate a sympathetic glance versus a rude
      > remark.
      > For more information on autism, visit the Web site:
      > www.AutismInfo.com or
      > call 1-800-3AUTISM.
      >




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    • Sohada Awad
      may Allah grant you reward for your steadfast and paitence in all you go through raising your children. another means of attaining more mercy from Allah.. ...
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 29, 2004
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        may Allah grant you reward for your steadfast and paitence in all you go through raising your children. another means of attaining more mercy from Allah..
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Monday, August 23, 2004 10:04 AM
        Subject: [KidsIslamicStories] autism challanges

        Autism challenges

        We are the parents of two children. One, a boy, is autistic. Autism in itself is a very difficult disability, which can cause children and adults diagnosed with it to have difficulty with social situations. There are many other extreme challenges that affect these individuals, and their families that the majority of the general public will never understand.

        Once in a while, our son has had meltdowns and screaming fits like a 2-year-old. Sometimes, a shopping trip proves to be too much for him to handle. (Haven't we all felt like that at one time or another?) The mall may be crowded, or noisy. Now, if he was two, this would be socially acceptable, but he is 8 years old.

        This, we have found, creates quite a phenomenon among some people. It is called being rude. We have had complete strangers come up to us - as we were trying to leave - they will block our way and usually say something intelligent like: "What he needs is a good spanking."

        We sometimes feel that we should wear a T-shirt that says, "I'm sorry, but the child is autistic." This sounds silly, but if he were visibly a handicapped child, people would not do this, they would understand. Our oldest child observes these people making hurtful remarks, and she does not understand how they can be so mean.

        The next time you are shopping, and you see a child having a tantrum, act out of compassion - not ignorance. Who knows, that child may have autism or another disability, or just be having a bad day. Either way, I'm sure the parents would appreciate a sympathetic glance versus a rude remark.

        For more information on autism, visit the Web site: www.AutismInfo.com or call 1-800-3AUTISM.

        Teach and talk as you learn Arabic.

        Bismillahir Rahmanir Rahim

        Surah 51:56
        Wama Khalaqtul Jinna Wal Insa ILLa liya'a buduun.
        And I (Allah) have not created  the jinn and mankind except that they should worship Me (alone).

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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      • Ummhanifah Khan
        Assalamualaykum sister, May Allaah give you ease and reward you for your patience and efforts. Walaykumassalam Umm Hanifah ... Faster than e-mail, more
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 29, 2004
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          Assalamualaykum sister,

          May Allaah give you ease and reward you for your patience and efforts.

          Walaykumassalam Umm Hanifah

          >From: ummezahid@...
          >Reply-To: KidsIslamicStories@yahoogroups.com
          >To: muslimahalaqa@yahoogroups.com, muslimbychoice@...,        muslim_teachers_united@..., Muslim_Library2004@...,        modestclothinggiveaway@yahoogroups.com,        Marylandhomeschool@yahoogroups.com, KidsIslamicStories@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: [KidsIslamicStories] autism challanges
          >Date: Mon, 23 Aug 2004 10:04:37 EDT
          >
          >Autism challenges
          >We are the parents of two children. One, a boy, is autistic. Autism in itself
          >is a very difficult disability, which can cause children and adults diagnosed
          >with it to have difficulty with social situations. There are many other
          >extreme challenges that affect these individuals, and their families that the
          >majority of the general public will never understand.
          >Once in a while, our son has had meltdowns and screaming fits like a
          >2-year-old. Sometimes, a shopping trip proves to be too much for him to handle.
          >(Haven't we all felt like that at one time or another?) The mall may be crowded, or
          >noisy. Now, if he was two, this would be socially acceptable, but he is 8
          >years old.
          >This, we have found, creates quite a phenomenon among some people. It is
          >called being rude. We have had complete strangers come up to us - as we were
          >trying to leave - they will block our way and usually say something intelligent
          >like: "What he needs is a good spanking."
          >We sometimes feel that we should wear a T-shirt that says, "I'm sorry, but
          >the child is autistic." This sounds silly, but if he were visibly a handicapped
          >child, people would not do this, they would understand. Our oldest child
          >observes these people making hurtful remarks, and she does not understand how they
          >can be so mean.
          >The next time you are shopping, and you see a child having a tantrum, act out
          >of compassion - not ignorance. Who knows, that child may have autism or
          >another disability, or just be having a bad day. Either way, I'm sure the parents
          >would appreciate a sympathetic glance versus a rude remark.
          >For more information on autism, visit the Web site: www.AutismInfo.com or
          >call 1-800-3AUTISM.


          Faster than e-mail, more discreet than a phone call and best of all it's free - download MSN Messenger today!
        • Toni Lindsay
          as salaamu alaikum. I have a daughter that is autistic too she is 7 years old. But very high functioning. She has melt downs too like a 4 or five year old.
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 30, 2004
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            as salaamu alaikum. I have a daughter that is autistic too she is 7 years old. But very high functioning. She has melt downs too like a 4 or five year old. But what I found that works is that if I leave the situation and she does not have an audience she stops the tantrums and apologizes. But this is a process the tantrums have decreased considerably but she still have them sometimes. Some people just have to be ignored in public and you deal with your situation because the child wants the attention from you and not them. And that's for any child autistic or not.

            Ummnajlaajawaad
            www.khadijaslingerie.50megs.com



            --- ummezahid@... wrote:
            Autism challenges
            We are the parents of two children. One, a boy, is autistic. Autism in itself
            is a very difficult disability, which can cause children and adults diagnosed
            with it to have difficulty with social situations. There are many other
            extreme challenges that affect these individuals, and their families that the
            majority of the general public will never understand.
            Once in a while, our son has had meltdowns and screaming fits like a
            2-year-old. Sometimes, a shopping trip proves to be too much for him to handle.
            (Haven't we all felt like that at one time or another?) The mall may be crowded, or
            noisy. Now, if he was two, this would be socially acceptable, but he is 8
            years old.
            This, we have found, creates quite a phenomenon among some people. It is
            called being rude. We have had complete strangers come up to us - as we were
            trying to leave - they will block our way and usually say something intelligent
            like: "What he needs is a good spanking."
            We sometimes feel that we should wear a T-shirt that says, "I'm sorry, but
            the child is autistic." This sounds silly, but if he were visibly a handicapped
            child, people would not do this, they would understand. Our oldest child
            observes these people making hurtful remarks, and she does not understand how they
            can be so mean.
            The next time you are shopping, and you see a child having a tantrum, act out
            of compassion - not ignorance. Who knows, that child may have autism or
            another disability, or just be having a bad day. Either way, I'm sure the parents
            would appreciate a sympathetic glance versus a rude remark.
            For more information on autism, visit the Web site: www.AutismInfo.com or
            call 1-800-3AUTISM.


            _____________________________________________________________
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          • Nabilah shukoor
            I refer to the letter written in regards to Autism, I myself in person have no children with this condition BUT I have and still do work with children with
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 31, 2004
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              I refer to the letter written in regards to Autism,

              I myself in person have no children with this
              condition BUT I have and still do work with children
              with Autism, and I agree with you 100% the general
              public should stop and think but they dont, please do
              bear in mind that you cant always blame the public, as
              many have no knowlege what this condition is, and what
              actually happens.I guess it comes down to the learing
              aspects, we need to address this by telling the public
              what it is, but again not enough is being done to pass
              the details around....

              I do understand and Inshallah all will get better....


              Wasalam

              --- ummezahid@... wrote:
              > Autism challenges
              > We are the parents of two children. One, a boy, is
              > autistic. Autism in itself
              > is a very difficult disability, which can cause
              > children and adults diagnosed
              > with it to have difficulty with social situations.
              > There are many other
              > extreme challenges that affect these individuals,
              > and their families that the
              > majority of the general public will never
              > understand.
              > Once in a while, our son has had meltdowns and
              > screaming fits like a
              > 2-year-old. Sometimes, a shopping trip proves to be
              > too much for him to handle.
              > (Haven't we all felt like that at one time or
              > another?) The mall may be crowded, or
              > noisy. Now, if he was two, this would be socially
              > acceptable, but he is 8
              > years old.
              > This, we have found, creates quite a phenomenon
              > among some people. It is
              > called being rude. We have had complete strangers
              > come up to us - as we were
              > trying to leave - they will block our way and
              > usually say something intelligent
              > like: "What he needs is a good spanking."
              > We sometimes feel that we should wear a T-shirt that
              > says, "I'm sorry, but
              > the child is autistic." This sounds silly, but if he
              > were visibly a handicapped
              > child, people would not do this, they would
              > understand. Our oldest child
              > observes these people making hurtful remarks, and
              > she does not understand how they
              > can be so mean.
              > The next time you are shopping, and you see a child
              > having a tantrum, act out
              > of compassion - not ignorance. Who knows, that child
              > may have autism or
              > another disability, or just be having a bad day.
              > Either way, I'm sure the parents
              > would appreciate a sympathetic glance versus a rude
              > remark.
              > For more information on autism, visit the Web site:
              > www.AutismInfo.com or
              > call 1-800-3AUTISM.
              >





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