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milky looking kerosene?

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  • Chad Fernandez
    I certainly screwed myself tonight. I tried filling two laundry jugs with kerosene and filling in the kitchen. One was soap, the other bleach, both throughly
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 3, 2014
      I certainly screwed myself tonight. I tried filling two laundry jugs
      with kerosene and filling in the kitchen. One was soap, the other
      bleach, both throughly washed and dried. The laundry soap jug wasn't to
      bad, but bleach bottle apparently dribbled. Not a lot, but any amount
      is too much on the kitchen floor and the drip pan. Trying to wash the
      drip pan in the sink is a nightmare..... still have to wash the kitchen
      floor to make sure the cats don't get into kerosene. I should have just
      done it outside...... no, not because I could have spilled without
      consequences, but because I DON'T spill outside more than a few drops!!!

      Filling the jugs was not good either. I filled them at the gas station
      and the stupid pump started off very slowly, and then got fast (normal)
      at the end. That and the short hose that is hard to control, and the
      containers being small meant I got kerosene all over the outside.

      (Milky Kerosene Part)

      While filling the heater, I noticed the kerosene coming out of the
      bleach bottle was a bit milky looking. The only thing that would have
      been in there would have been alcohol that I poured in yesterday. I did
      the same with the other bottle, but that one wasn't milky. Any ideas?
      I lit the heater, and it seems to be burning ok.

      Chad Fernandez
      Michigan, USA
    • Larry Hollenberg
      Chad,  If I understand correctly your moving oil from a larger container to a smaller one for convenience of filling items?  I do that for things like lamps
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 4, 2014
        Chad, 

        If I understand correctly your moving oil from a larger container to a smaller one for convenience of filling items?  I do that for things like lamps and small jugs that need oil, especially if the 5 gallon can is heavy and hard to control.  My choice for a transfer can is a galvanized open top long spout oil can. I think they are used mostly for filling oil in vehicles. They are at most farm supply stores and maybe some hardware?  The long spout makes tilting them and pouring fairly easy. I always use a wide funnel to keep down any possible splashing.  I don't use it a lot but I also have one of the sort of oval shaped funnels that has a small center stem which is attached to a cork and when the stem starts to raise its time to quit filling.  I rarely spill or run any over with that set up.  For filling I use a porcelain top table to make easy clean up if I do when I use small lamps or oil jugs. 

        As to the milky appearance the only time I had that was when the filling station I sometimes used got a load of kerosene with water in it.. That makes it turn milky looking. Not sure if the alcohol would cause a similar look or not?  Could there have been some small amount of water in the container still? 

        Larry


        On Friday, January 3, 2014 8:11 PM, Chad Fernandez <chad.fernandez@...> wrote:
         
        I certainly screwed myself tonight. I tried filling two laundry jugs
        with kerosene and filling in the kitchen. One was soap, the other
        bleach, both throughly washed and dried. The laundry soap jug wasn't to
        bad, but bleach bottle apparently dribbled. Not a lot, but any amount
        is too much on the kitchen floor and the drip pan. Trying to wash the
        drip pan in the sink is a nightmare..... still have to wash the kitchen
        floor to make sure the cats don't get into kerosene. I should have just
        done it outside...... no, not because I could have spilled without
        consequences, but because I DON'T spill outside more than a few drops!!!

        Filling the jugs was not good either. I filled them at the gas station
        and the stupid pump started off very slowly, and then got fast (normal)
        at the end. That and the short hose that is hard to control, and the
        containers being small meant I got kerosene all over the outside.

        (Milky Kerosene Part)

        While filling the heater, I noticed the kerosene coming out of the
        bleach bottle was a bit milky looking. The only thing that would have
        been in there would have been alcohol that I poured in yesterday. I did
        the same with the other bottle, but that one wasn't milky. Any ideas?
        I lit the heater, and it seems to be burning ok.

        Chad Fernandez
        Michigan, USA


      • Chad Fernandez
        ... I actually filled the small containers at the pump. The smallest actually filled better than the larger of the two. Something was going on with the pump,
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 4, 2014
          On 01/04/2014 08:42 AM, Larry Hollenberg wrote:
          > Chad,
          >
          > If I understand correctly your moving oil from a larger container to a
          > smaller one for convenience of filling items?

          I actually filled the small containers at the pump. The smallest
          actually filled better than the larger of the two. Something was going
          on with the pump, as it was quite slow at first.

          > As to the milky appearance the only time I had that was when the filling
          > station I sometimes used got a load of kerosene with water in it.. That
          > makes it turn milky looking. Not sure if the alcohol would cause a
          > similar look or not? Could there have been some small amount of water
          > in the container still?

          Both containers had alcohol added, so I don't think that is it. Both
          containers were also dried, beforehand. I paid close attention to that.
          If the bleach bottle did have a few drops of water in it, it couldn't
          have been enough to effect that much kerosene. That bottle held more
          than a gallon. I thought maybe some residual bleach, but the bottle was
          rinsed well, and didn't even smell of bleach anymore.

          I'm a little gun shy to go back and get more kerosene from that pump, as
          the difference in pumping came right before switching bottles, and the
          second bottle looked normal.....not milky.

          Chad Fernandez
          Michigan, USA
        • Chad Fernandez
          ... I thought the methanol was the whole reason to stay away from regular automotive water removers, and to use the isopropanol formulas. I know isopropanol is
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 4, 2014
            On 01/04/2014 01:11 PM, William Farrar wrote:
            > Well, this is true but you are not going to consume it, just use it for
            > its intended purpose which is to remove water from kero.

            I thought the methanol was the whole reason to stay away from regular
            automotive water removers, and to use the isopropanol formulas.

            I know isopropanol is poisonous to consume, too.

            Chad Fernandez
            Michigan, USA
          • Larry Hollenberg
            You need to ask your source to check their kerosene supply, it may be what happened to me in that there was water in the delivery just before I got it.  They
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 4, 2014
              You need to ask your source to check their kerosene supply, it may be what happened to me in that there was water in the delivery just before I got it.  They had to shut down the pump and it took some time to get it out and corrected.   If there is water in the fuel it will show up if you put it in a small glass jar and observe the very bottom, if you see a sort of glob of a substance laying on the bottom that is the water.  

              Larry


              On Saturday, January 4, 2014 1:11 PM, Chad Fernandez <chad.fernandez@...> wrote:
               
              On 01/04/2014 01:11 PM, William Farrar wrote:
              > Well, this is true but you are not going to consume it, just use it for
              > its intended purpose which is to remove water from kero.

              I thought the methanol was the whole reason to stay away from regular
              automotive water removers, and to use the isopropanol formulas.

              I know isopropanol is poisonous to consume, too.

              Chad Fernandez
              Michigan, USA



            • Chad Fernandez
              I haven t gotten anymore kerosene yet, but adding more alcohol to what was in the heater seemed to clear up the cloudiness. I still need to burn the wick dry,
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 9, 2014
                I haven't gotten anymore kerosene yet, but adding more alcohol to what
                was in the heater seemed to clear up the cloudiness. I still need to
                burn the wick dry, Though. I need to do that outside, and I haven't had
                a nice enough day to do it, yet.

                Chad Fernandez
                Michigan, USA

                On 01/04/2014 02:16 PM, Larry Hollenberg wrote:
                > You need to ask your source to check their kerosene supply, it may be
                > what happened to me in that there was water in the delivery just before
                > I got it. They had to shut down the pump and it took some time to get
                > it out and corrected. If there is water in the fuel it will show up if
                > you put it in a small glass jar and observe the very bottom, if you see
                > a sort of glob of a substance laying on the bottom that is the water.
                >
                > Larry
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