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Cooking on a Perfection Stove

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  • techeditor2
    I just finished cooking a 6 lb pork butt for pulled pork. I usually cook it on the West Bend electric heating plate that warms their 6 qt. waterless stainless
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 15, 2013
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      I just finished cooking a 6 lb pork butt for pulled pork. I usually cook it on the West Bend electric heating plate that warms their 6 qt. waterless stainless steel pot. This time I decided to use my Perfection stove (320A). I browned the meat on high yellow flame, then turned it down to low blue flame. Within 1/2 hour I had a waterless seal on the lid. That's a full 2 hrs faster than the electric heater.
      After about 1-1/2 hrs I was getting boiling coming around the water seal of the lid so I turn the flame down to yellow and continued to cook for a total time of 4-1/2 hrs. About the same cooking time as the electric heating plate.
      No matter the heat source, you can not push the cooking too fast or you get moisture escaping the water seal of the lid. (For those not knowledgeable about waterless cookware, a waterless seal is obtained when steam turns back to water and forms a water barrier between the top and the pot. The top should be able to be spun on this water seal. Cook to hard and steam escapes.)
      Anyway, the pulled pork turned out great. (Recipe available upon request) but next time, I think I may use my "tall chimney" 110 single burner that is 30% less powerful. Dropping the "high power" burner to yellow flame really carbons up the wick. It would not even burn smooth because there was much tar build up when turned back up after 3 hrs on yellow flame. A good cleaning with an original wick cleaner and all is good again.
      So, it's either the "tall chimney" stove or maybe a heat defuser to deflect the heat on low blue flame with the "high power" burner.
      Either way I really enjoyed using the Perfection stove.
      Greg
    • Larry Hollenberg
      Greg, Glad that your enjoying your Perfection Stove.  The low flame on perfection should still remain blue.. The only time it should be yellow is when the
      Message 2 of 5 , Sep 15, 2013
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        Greg,

        Glad that your enjoying your Perfection Stove.  The low flame on perfection should still remain blue.. The only time it should be yellow is when the tips show yellow on a high heat and they are supposed to go about an inch high at the most.  I have also used a diverter to keep the heat range down on things that require a low heat.. Burning the yellow flame on low is a possible way to overheat the burner and would increase the carbon build up.  

        Sadly again this is a development that seems more recent and due to some change in the oil quality.  I have pretty much given up my Boss three burner long chimney stove due to that very issue.. It causes the oil to overflow the brass burners due to not being burned efficiently an that helps to cause odor as well as a build up of brown looking stains on the brass burner.  

        I don't know if your able to access the photo albums and make them open or not?  I am not able to do so on the stove group. A couple other groups they will open but not ours. If so the album of How to Use your Perfection Range shows the correct heights of flame for the burners.  

        I have pretty much gone to my Kenmore (Boss) range I just finished restoring.. The parts other than the porcelain oven front and right side and top had all been overpainted a time or two and needed attention. Same for the handles and interior parts.   The wickless type moveable burners for some reason are not prone to carbon build up until they have been used for quite some time.. Plus there is no constant attention needed to keep the wicks clean or the burner polished up.  They are more difficult to master and get everything burning just so, but once you have one figured out they work rather well.  

        Larry

        From: techeditor2 <hmca@...>
        To: KeroseneHeaterandStoveCollector@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, September 15, 2013 3:12 PM
        Subject: [KeroseneHeaterandStoveCollector] Cooking on a Perfection Stove

         
        I just finished cooking a 6 lb pork butt for pulled pork. I usually cook it on the West Bend electric heating plate that warms their 6 qt. waterless stainless steel pot. This time I decided to use my Perfection stove (320A). I browned the meat on high yellow flame, then turned it down to low blue flame. Within 1/2 hour I had a waterless seal on the lid. That's a full 2 hrs faster than the electric heater.
        After about 1-1/2 hrs I was getting boiling coming around the water seal of the lid so I turn the flame down to yellow and continued to cook for a total time of 4-1/2 hrs. About the same cooking time as the electric heating plate.
        No matter the heat source, you can not push the cooking too fast or you get moisture escaping the water seal of the lid. (For those not knowledgeable about waterless cookware, a waterless seal is obtained when steam turns back to water and forms a water barrier between the top and the pot. The top should be able to be spun on this water seal. Cook to hard and steam escapes.)
        Anyway, the pulled pork turned out great. (Recipe available upon request) but next time, I think I may use my "tall chimney" 110 single burner that is 30% less powerful. Dropping the "high power" burner to yellow flame really carbons up the wick. It would not even burn smooth because there was much tar build up when turned back up after 3 hrs on yellow flame. A good cleaning with an original wick cleaner and all is good again.
        So, it's either the "tall chimney" stove or maybe a heat defuser to deflect the heat on low blue flame with the "high power" burner.
        Either way I really enjoyed using the Perfection stove.
        Greg



      • techeditor2
        Larry, I can access all the photo albums. I do know that I shouldn t turn the wick so low that I loose the blue flame but even the low blue flame was too hot
        Message 3 of 5 , Sep 15, 2013
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          Larry,
          I can access all the photo albums. I do know that I shouldn't turn the wick so low that I loose the blue flame but even the low blue flame was too hot and I had to turn it down. So next time I either need to devise some kind of heat diverter or use the "long chimney" burner of my Ivanhoe 110 that doesn't produce as much heat and can possible stay at a low blue flame. Only testing will tell.
          Greg

          --- In KeroseneHeaterandStoveCollector@yahoogroups.com, Larry Hollenberg <larryhollenb@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > Greg,
          >
          > Glad that your enjoying your Perfection Stove.  The low flame on perfection should still remain blue.. The only time it should be yellow is when the tips show yellow on a high heat and they are supposed to go about an inch high at the most.  I have also used a diverter to keep the heat range down on things that require a low heat.. Burning the yellow flame on low is a possible way to overheat the burner and would increase the carbon build up.  
          >
          > Sadly again this is a development that seems more recent and due to some change in the oil quality.  I have pretty much given up my Boss three burner long chimney stove due to that very issue.. It causes the oil to overflow the brass burners due to not being burned efficiently an that helps to cause odor as well as a build up of brown looking stains on the brass burner.  
          >
          > I don't know if your able to access the photo albums and make them open or not?  I am not able to do so on the stove group. A couple other groups they will open but not ours. If so the album of How to Use your Perfection Range shows the correct heights of flame for the burners.  
          >
          > I have pretty much gone to my Kenmore (Boss) range I just finished restoring.. The parts other than the porcelain oven front and right side and top had all been overpainted a time or two and needed attention. Same for the handles and interior parts.   The wickless type moveable burners for some reason are not prone to carbon build up until they have been used for quite some time.. Plus there is no constant attention needed to keep the wicks clean or the burner polished up.  They are more difficult to master and get everything burning just so, but once you have one figured out they work rather well.  
          >
          > Larry
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: techeditor2 <hmca@...>
          > To: KeroseneHeaterandStoveCollector@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Sunday, September 15, 2013 3:12 PM
          > Subject: [KeroseneHeaterandStoveCollector] Cooking on a Perfection Stove
          >
          >
          >
          >  
          > I just finished cooking a 6 lb pork butt for pulled pork. I usually cook it on the West Bend electric heating plate that warms their 6 qt. waterless stainless steel pot. This time I decided to use my Perfection stove (320A). I browned the meat on high yellow flame, then turned it down to low blue flame. Within 1/2 hour I had a waterless seal on the lid. That's a full 2 hrs faster than the electric heater.
          > After about 1-1/2 hrs I was getting boiling coming around the water seal of the lid so I turn the flame down to yellow and continued to cook for a total time of 4-1/2 hrs. About the same cooking time as the electric heating plate.
          > No matter the heat source, you can not push the cooking too fast or you get moisture escaping the water seal of the lid. (For those not knowledgeable about waterless cookware, a waterless seal is obtained when steam turns back to water and forms a water barrier between the top and the pot. The top should be able to be spun on this water seal. Cook to hard and steam escapes.)
          > Anyway, the pulled pork turned out great. (Recipe available upon request) but next time, I think I may use my "tall chimney" 110 single burner that is 30% less powerful. Dropping the "high power" burner to yellow flame really carbons up the wick. It would not even burn smooth because there was much tar build up when turned back up after 3 hrs on yellow flame. A good cleaning with an original wick cleaner and all is good again.
          > So, it's either the "tall chimney" stove or maybe a heat defuser to deflect the heat on low blue flame with the "high power" burner.
          > Either way I really enjoyed using the Perfection stove.
          > Greg
          >
        • techeditor2
          Larry, I picked up this cast iron heat diffuser off of E-bay that I hope will allow me to cook at a slow rate and still keep a blue flame. Greg
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 6, 2013
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            Larry,
            I picked up this cast iron heat diffuser off of E-bay that I hope will allow me to cook at a slow rate and still keep a blue flame.
            Greg
            Item picture
          • Larry Hollenberg
            Greig, That may help.. Diffusers are helpful but I am not sure of the success of that type.. I guess a test will tell.  If not some of the ones with a wood
            Message 5 of 5 , Dec 6, 2013
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              Greig,

              That may help.. Diffusers are helpful but I am not sure of the success of that type.. I guess a test will tell.  If not some of the ones with a wood handle and two layers of holes, called a simmer pad or something like that tends to work.. Also Tricolator made one that is on ebay often, its also similar with several layers of metal and holes to diffuse the heat.   Good luck and let us know what you find.

              Larry


              On Friday, December 6, 2013 9:30 PM, "hmca@..." <hmca@...> wrote:
               
              Larry,
              I picked up this cast iron heat diffuser off of E-bay that I hope will allow me to cook at a slow rate and still keep a blue flame.
              Greg
              Item picture


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