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File - Hurricane Prep for Horse Owners and Pets

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  • KatrinasAngelsinActionForum@yahoogroups.
    ***Horse Transporters, please visit and add your service to the evacuation forums so that horse owners can contact you to set up their evacuation plans!!
    Message 1 of 11 , Oct 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      ***Horse Transporters, please visit and add your service to the
      evacuation forums so that horse owners can contact you to set up
      their evacuation plans!!

      AnimalHelp.Com is putting out a challenge to all horse pet owners
      to get ready for Hurricane season by making sure they have a plan in
      place, that includes their pets, before June 1st, 2007. Even if you
      don't live in a coastal area, disaster preparation for your pet is
      important so this information is great for any pet owner anywhere !
      By forwarding this email to other horse owners you know, you will
      help save lives and ensure that this year will not be such a tragedy
      as years past have been.

      ***Cross Posting and Forwarding Encouraged** **

      May 2007 � Hurricane Preparedness for Pets Challenge
      June 1st marks the start of the 2007 hurricane season. Are you
      ready? What about your pets? Do you have a plan?
      Now is the time to get ready � before hurricane season starts. Take
      the challenge: let 2007 be the year all of us who own pets are ready
      for hurricane season with an effective family plan in place. Do not
      ever think it will not happen to you. If you live in a coastal area,
      it CAN happen, and you must be ready.
      Jodi Beck Witte is no stranger to hurricanes. As a long time member
      of a federal veterinary disaster response team, she has seen her
      share, including Hurricane Katrina, Wilma, Rita, Jeanne, Frances,
      Charlie, and many others. "The common element is so many people who
      do not have plans for their animals and as a result, too many get
      left behind, or those pet owners will not evacuate because they
      won't leave their pets," said Ms Witte.
      The most notable example of the lack of preparedness came with
      Hurricane Katrina and the devastated animal population of Louisiana.
      Thousands of pets were left to die, despite hundreds of volunteers
      trying to save them after the fact. Nationwide outrage and blame was
      reported in the news directed toward FEMA and the government. In
      reality, at the most basic level, it was the pet owners who failed
      to prepare for the possibility of such an event. Since her federal
      deployment to New Orleans to help the animals left behind in the
      aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Ms Witte has spent considerable
      effort trying to educate the public about their preparedness needs.
      With the passing of the new PETS Act, all states are required to
      include pets and pet owners in their disaster plans. While this is a
      great step forward in animal disaster preparedness, Ms Witte
      encourages pet owners to completely understand how they are
      ultimately responsible for their pet's safety and evacuation in the
      event of a hurricane or other disaster. She offers the following
      information to help the pet owner prepare:
      Responsibility: It is not the job of FEMA, nor any federal, state,
      or local government entity to evacuate you or your pet before a
      disaster. While your local government may have transportation
      available for those who need it to local shelters, people come first
      and even if pets are allowed on these transports, the need may arise
      where precious space must be given to a person rather then an
      animal. The same holds true for shelter space. If you do not have a
      plan in place for your own animals, you can not expect others to
      take full responsibility for them. The responsibility is yours,
      first and foremost, as a pet owner.
      The Plan
      Where to Evacuate To: The first thing to set up your plan; have a
      safe location to evacuate to where you can take your pets. This may
      be a pet-friendly hotel, a relative or friend, or even a boarding
      facility well inland who can safely house your pet during the storm.
      You must arrange this location before hand, not when the evacuation
      orders come in. This month, before hurricane season begins, make
      contact with a hotel, boarding facility, or your relatives and make
      sure you will be welcome with little notice and wagging tails.
      Transportation: The second part of your plan to have in place is
      transportation. If you have pets, try hard not to rely on what will
      be an overburdened emergency response. If, at all possible, have
      your own transportation and make sure you can fit your family and
      all of your pets in that vehicle. It may take more then one vehicle
      to move the entire family � don't wait until the last moment to try
      to figure out how to make it work. Car Pooling with friends and
      neighbors may work well if you have planned together.
      The Supplies: The third part of your plan must be to have all
      necessary supplies on hand, ready to go, if an evacuation order
      comes down. These supplies are separate from the supplies you use
      with your pet everyday. These should be purchased and stored
      separately in an easily assessable place in the event of an
      emergency. Do not use these supplies for any other reason during the
      hurricane season.
      Your pets must have identification. Make sure that there is an
      alternate phone number on that ID where a message can be left. If
      the only phone number on the tag is your home phone number, it won't
      do your pet much good if you have been evacuated.
      Each dog must have a leash at the very minimum, and better yet has
      both a leash and a crate. Cats must have a crate or you can purchase
      a cardboard carrying box from your vet made just for cats. The crate
      will be necessary if you or your pet must stay in a shelter, and
      some hotels may require it. For small pocket pets such as gerbils
      and hamsters or birds, purchase small travel crates or plastic
      containers made for these little critters and available at your
      local pet store. Have them pre-labeled with the animal's ID. Photo
      copy all of your pet's current health records so you have proof of
      vaccination history. Take a couple photographs of each pet and place
      the records and photos all together in a waterproof container such
      as a zip lock baggie. Ask your veterinarian for an extra 2 week
      supply of any current drugs your pet may need if applicable.
      Purchase a 2 week supply of food, several gallons of water and have
      a food and water dish for each.
      For emergency storage, place each pet's emergency leash, food/water
      dishes, and emergency medications in their crate labeled with the
      pet's name and your contact information. Place these together with
      the food and water supplies, and the vet records, in an easily
      assessable place. These are your "go" supplies. You will be able to
      quickly evacuate with your pets if these are ready.
      Other Animals: Horses, cows, and other livestock present a serious
      challenge for evacuation. If you cannot evacuate these animals, be
      sure you keep plenty of food supplies on hand at all times, placed
      as high as possible in your barn. Have copies of their records and
      photos which you can take with you for identification later. When
      the evacuation orders come down, label each animal with spray paint
      right on their body with your name and emergency phone number. The
      paint will not hurt them and will stay on even in the rain.
      Horses and livestock have better chances of survival if they are
      turned out in their pasture versus being closed up in a barn. While
      we may feel the urge to put them up in the barn to keep them from
      the storm, this presents many dangers and traps the animal if the
      building is damaged or in the event of a flood. Under no
      circumstances should any animal left to face a storm, including
      livestock or pets, be tied to any structure or placed in a stall or
      kennel with a roof on it. In the event of a flood these animals will
      not be able to swim or escape rising water.
      One month, three steps to prepare, a family to keep safe.
      AnimalHelp.Com challenges you to be ready this year, for your entire
      family. This month, get your family ready and help others get ready.
      Start with your family and then help your neighborhood. Talk to the
      pet owners and educate them. Develop a support system so that if
      someone is not home, or cannot get back to get their pets, someone
      else can. Have them designate a spot where all their "go" supplies
      will be for their pets, where their support person will know where
      to find everything. Once your neighborhood is ready, expand your
      efforts to include your whole town. Train your friends to train
      their friends. Keep it going and pass it forward. Education and
      preparation are key. Do not sit back and expect the federal or state
      governments - or anyone else for that matter - to come in and rescue
      your pets if you cannot put forth an effort to make arrangements for
      them before the disaster.

      This year let us not allow a hurricane to cause the loss of life we
      saw with Hurricane Katrina. Everything else is replaceable.
      Visit www.animalhelp. com during the month of May for more
      information, resources, supply lists, activities, flyers, posters,
      and materials you can use to help get prepared and help educate
      others.

      --
      Denise Marhoefer
      National News Correspondent
      Independent Investigative Journalist
      The Defense Foundation For Children USA
      www.defensefoundati onforchildren. com
      defensefoundation@ gmail.com
      http://www.blogtalk radio.com/ Justice1
      Miracles Of Hope Network www.miracles- of-hope.com
      Dedicated to the creation and restoration of good in the lives of
      children--
      Our Auction House
      http://www.the- promise-line. com/auction3. 1/
      http://www.squidoo. com/MiraclesOfHo peNetwork/
      Forum
      www.defensefoundati onforchildren. com/board/
      affiliate isp:http://www.isp. com/?defensefoun dation
      voicemail 765.381.1112
    • KatrinasAngelsinActionForum@yahoogroups.c
      ***Horse Transporters, please visit and add your service to the evacuation forums so that horse owners can contact you to set up their evacuation plans!!
      Message 2 of 11 , Nov 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        ***Horse Transporters, please visit and add your service to the
        evacuation forums so that horse owners can contact you to set up
        their evacuation plans!!

        AnimalHelp.Com is putting out a challenge to all horse pet owners
        to get ready for Hurricane season by making sure they have a plan in
        place, that includes their pets, before June 1st, 2007. Even if you
        don't live in a coastal area, disaster preparation for your pet is
        important so this information is great for any pet owner anywhere !
        By forwarding this email to other horse owners you know, you will
        help save lives and ensure that this year will not be such a tragedy
        as years past have been.

        ***Cross Posting and Forwarding Encouraged** **

        May 2007 � Hurricane Preparedness for Pets Challenge
        June 1st marks the start of the 2007 hurricane season. Are you
        ready? What about your pets? Do you have a plan?
        Now is the time to get ready � before hurricane season starts. Take
        the challenge: let 2007 be the year all of us who own pets are ready
        for hurricane season with an effective family plan in place. Do not
        ever think it will not happen to you. If you live in a coastal area,
        it CAN happen, and you must be ready.
        Jodi Beck Witte is no stranger to hurricanes. As a long time member
        of a federal veterinary disaster response team, she has seen her
        share, including Hurricane Katrina, Wilma, Rita, Jeanne, Frances,
        Charlie, and many others. "The common element is so many people who
        do not have plans for their animals and as a result, too many get
        left behind, or those pet owners will not evacuate because they
        won't leave their pets," said Ms Witte.
        The most notable example of the lack of preparedness came with
        Hurricane Katrina and the devastated animal population of Louisiana.
        Thousands of pets were left to die, despite hundreds of volunteers
        trying to save them after the fact. Nationwide outrage and blame was
        reported in the news directed toward FEMA and the government. In
        reality, at the most basic level, it was the pet owners who failed
        to prepare for the possibility of such an event. Since her federal
        deployment to New Orleans to help the animals left behind in the
        aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Ms Witte has spent considerable
        effort trying to educate the public about their preparedness needs.
        With the passing of the new PETS Act, all states are required to
        include pets and pet owners in their disaster plans. While this is a
        great step forward in animal disaster preparedness, Ms Witte
        encourages pet owners to completely understand how they are
        ultimately responsible for their pet's safety and evacuation in the
        event of a hurricane or other disaster. She offers the following
        information to help the pet owner prepare:
        Responsibility: It is not the job of FEMA, nor any federal, state,
        or local government entity to evacuate you or your pet before a
        disaster. While your local government may have transportation
        available for those who need it to local shelters, people come first
        and even if pets are allowed on these transports, the need may arise
        where precious space must be given to a person rather then an
        animal. The same holds true for shelter space. If you do not have a
        plan in place for your own animals, you can not expect others to
        take full responsibility for them. The responsibility is yours,
        first and foremost, as a pet owner.
        The Plan
        Where to Evacuate To: The first thing to set up your plan; have a
        safe location to evacuate to where you can take your pets. This may
        be a pet-friendly hotel, a relative or friend, or even a boarding
        facility well inland who can safely house your pet during the storm.
        You must arrange this location before hand, not when the evacuation
        orders come in. This month, before hurricane season begins, make
        contact with a hotel, boarding facility, or your relatives and make
        sure you will be welcome with little notice and wagging tails.
        Transportation: The second part of your plan to have in place is
        transportation. If you have pets, try hard not to rely on what will
        be an overburdened emergency response. If, at all possible, have
        your own transportation and make sure you can fit your family and
        all of your pets in that vehicle. It may take more then one vehicle
        to move the entire family � don't wait until the last moment to try
        to figure out how to make it work. Car Pooling with friends and
        neighbors may work well if you have planned together.
        The Supplies: The third part of your plan must be to have all
        necessary supplies on hand, ready to go, if an evacuation order
        comes down. These supplies are separate from the supplies you use
        with your pet everyday. These should be purchased and stored
        separately in an easily assessable place in the event of an
        emergency. Do not use these supplies for any other reason during the
        hurricane season.
        Your pets must have identification. Make sure that there is an
        alternate phone number on that ID where a message can be left. If
        the only phone number on the tag is your home phone number, it won't
        do your pet much good if you have been evacuated.
        Each dog must have a leash at the very minimum, and better yet has
        both a leash and a crate. Cats must have a crate or you can purchase
        a cardboard carrying box from your vet made just for cats. The crate
        will be necessary if you or your pet must stay in a shelter, and
        some hotels may require it. For small pocket pets such as gerbils
        and hamsters or birds, purchase small travel crates or plastic
        containers made for these little critters and available at your
        local pet store. Have them pre-labeled with the animal's ID. Photo
        copy all of your pet's current health records so you have proof of
        vaccination history. Take a couple photographs of each pet and place
        the records and photos all together in a waterproof container such
        as a zip lock baggie. Ask your veterinarian for an extra 2 week
        supply of any current drugs your pet may need if applicable.
        Purchase a 2 week supply of food, several gallons of water and have
        a food and water dish for each.
        For emergency storage, place each pet's emergency leash, food/water
        dishes, and emergency medications in their crate labeled with the
        pet's name and your contact information. Place these together with
        the food and water supplies, and the vet records, in an easily
        assessable place. These are your "go" supplies. You will be able to
        quickly evacuate with your pets if these are ready.
        Other Animals: Horses, cows, and other livestock present a serious
        challenge for evacuation. If you cannot evacuate these animals, be
        sure you keep plenty of food supplies on hand at all times, placed
        as high as possible in your barn. Have copies of their records and
        photos which you can take with you for identification later. When
        the evacuation orders come down, label each animal with spray paint
        right on their body with your name and emergency phone number. The
        paint will not hurt them and will stay on even in the rain.
        Horses and livestock have better chances of survival if they are
        turned out in their pasture versus being closed up in a barn. While
        we may feel the urge to put them up in the barn to keep them from
        the storm, this presents many dangers and traps the animal if the
        building is damaged or in the event of a flood. Under no
        circumstances should any animal left to face a storm, including
        livestock or pets, be tied to any structure or placed in a stall or
        kennel with a roof on it. In the event of a flood these animals will
        not be able to swim or escape rising water.
        One month, three steps to prepare, a family to keep safe.
        AnimalHelp.Com challenges you to be ready this year, for your entire
        family. This month, get your family ready and help others get ready.
        Start with your family and then help your neighborhood. Talk to the
        pet owners and educate them. Develop a support system so that if
        someone is not home, or cannot get back to get their pets, someone
        else can. Have them designate a spot where all their "go" supplies
        will be for their pets, where their support person will know where
        to find everything. Once your neighborhood is ready, expand your
        efforts to include your whole town. Train your friends to train
        their friends. Keep it going and pass it forward. Education and
        preparation are key. Do not sit back and expect the federal or state
        governments - or anyone else for that matter - to come in and rescue
        your pets if you cannot put forth an effort to make arrangements for
        them before the disaster.

        This year let us not allow a hurricane to cause the loss of life we
        saw with Hurricane Katrina. Everything else is replaceable.
        Visit www.animalhelp. com during the month of May for more
        information, resources, supply lists, activities, flyers, posters,
        and materials you can use to help get prepared and help educate
        others.

        --
        Denise Marhoefer
        National News Correspondent
        Independent Investigative Journalist
        The Defense Foundation For Children USA
        www.defensefoundati onforchildren. com
        defensefoundation@ gmail.com
        http://www.blogtalk radio.com/ Justice1
        Miracles Of Hope Network www.miracles- of-hope.com
        Dedicated to the creation and restoration of good in the lives of
        children--
        Our Auction House
        http://www.the- promise-line. com/auction3. 1/
        http://www.squidoo. com/MiraclesOfHo peNetwork/
        Forum
        www.defensefoundati onforchildren. com/board/
        affiliate isp:http://www.isp. com/?defensefoun dation
        voicemail 765.381.1112
      • KatrinasAngelsinActionForum@yahoogroups.c
        ***Horse Transporters, please visit and add your service to the evacuation forums so that horse owners can contact you to set up their evacuation plans!!
        Message 3 of 11 , Dec 1, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          ***Horse Transporters, please visit and add your service to the
          evacuation forums so that horse owners can contact you to set up
          their evacuation plans!!

          AnimalHelp.Com is putting out a challenge to all horse pet owners
          to get ready for Hurricane season by making sure they have a plan in
          place, that includes their pets, before June 1st, 2007. Even if you
          don't live in a coastal area, disaster preparation for your pet is
          important so this information is great for any pet owner anywhere !
          By forwarding this email to other horse owners you know, you will
          help save lives and ensure that this year will not be such a tragedy
          as years past have been.

          ***Cross Posting and Forwarding Encouraged** **

          May 2007 � Hurricane Preparedness for Pets Challenge
          June 1st marks the start of the 2007 hurricane season. Are you
          ready? What about your pets? Do you have a plan?
          Now is the time to get ready � before hurricane season starts. Take
          the challenge: let 2007 be the year all of us who own pets are ready
          for hurricane season with an effective family plan in place. Do not
          ever think it will not happen to you. If you live in a coastal area,
          it CAN happen, and you must be ready.
          Jodi Beck Witte is no stranger to hurricanes. As a long time member
          of a federal veterinary disaster response team, she has seen her
          share, including Hurricane Katrina, Wilma, Rita, Jeanne, Frances,
          Charlie, and many others. "The common element is so many people who
          do not have plans for their animals and as a result, too many get
          left behind, or those pet owners will not evacuate because they
          won't leave their pets," said Ms Witte.
          The most notable example of the lack of preparedness came with
          Hurricane Katrina and the devastated animal population of Louisiana.
          Thousands of pets were left to die, despite hundreds of volunteers
          trying to save them after the fact. Nationwide outrage and blame was
          reported in the news directed toward FEMA and the government. In
          reality, at the most basic level, it was the pet owners who failed
          to prepare for the possibility of such an event. Since her federal
          deployment to New Orleans to help the animals left behind in the
          aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Ms Witte has spent considerable
          effort trying to educate the public about their preparedness needs.
          With the passing of the new PETS Act, all states are required to
          include pets and pet owners in their disaster plans. While this is a
          great step forward in animal disaster preparedness, Ms Witte
          encourages pet owners to completely understand how they are
          ultimately responsible for their pet's safety and evacuation in the
          event of a hurricane or other disaster. She offers the following
          information to help the pet owner prepare:
          Responsibility: It is not the job of FEMA, nor any federal, state,
          or local government entity to evacuate you or your pet before a
          disaster. While your local government may have transportation
          available for those who need it to local shelters, people come first
          and even if pets are allowed on these transports, the need may arise
          where precious space must be given to a person rather then an
          animal. The same holds true for shelter space. If you do not have a
          plan in place for your own animals, you can not expect others to
          take full responsibility for them. The responsibility is yours,
          first and foremost, as a pet owner.
          The Plan
          Where to Evacuate To: The first thing to set up your plan; have a
          safe location to evacuate to where you can take your pets. This may
          be a pet-friendly hotel, a relative or friend, or even a boarding
          facility well inland who can safely house your pet during the storm.
          You must arrange this location before hand, not when the evacuation
          orders come in. This month, before hurricane season begins, make
          contact with a hotel, boarding facility, or your relatives and make
          sure you will be welcome with little notice and wagging tails.
          Transportation: The second part of your plan to have in place is
          transportation. If you have pets, try hard not to rely on what will
          be an overburdened emergency response. If, at all possible, have
          your own transportation and make sure you can fit your family and
          all of your pets in that vehicle. It may take more then one vehicle
          to move the entire family � don't wait until the last moment to try
          to figure out how to make it work. Car Pooling with friends and
          neighbors may work well if you have planned together.
          The Supplies: The third part of your plan must be to have all
          necessary supplies on hand, ready to go, if an evacuation order
          comes down. These supplies are separate from the supplies you use
          with your pet everyday. These should be purchased and stored
          separately in an easily assessable place in the event of an
          emergency. Do not use these supplies for any other reason during the
          hurricane season.
          Your pets must have identification. Make sure that there is an
          alternate phone number on that ID where a message can be left. If
          the only phone number on the tag is your home phone number, it won't
          do your pet much good if you have been evacuated.
          Each dog must have a leash at the very minimum, and better yet has
          both a leash and a crate. Cats must have a crate or you can purchase
          a cardboard carrying box from your vet made just for cats. The crate
          will be necessary if you or your pet must stay in a shelter, and
          some hotels may require it. For small pocket pets such as gerbils
          and hamsters or birds, purchase small travel crates or plastic
          containers made for these little critters and available at your
          local pet store. Have them pre-labeled with the animal's ID. Photo
          copy all of your pet's current health records so you have proof of
          vaccination history. Take a couple photographs of each pet and place
          the records and photos all together in a waterproof container such
          as a zip lock baggie. Ask your veterinarian for an extra 2 week
          supply of any current drugs your pet may need if applicable.
          Purchase a 2 week supply of food, several gallons of water and have
          a food and water dish for each.
          For emergency storage, place each pet's emergency leash, food/water
          dishes, and emergency medications in their crate labeled with the
          pet's name and your contact information. Place these together with
          the food and water supplies, and the vet records, in an easily
          assessable place. These are your "go" supplies. You will be able to
          quickly evacuate with your pets if these are ready.
          Other Animals: Horses, cows, and other livestock present a serious
          challenge for evacuation. If you cannot evacuate these animals, be
          sure you keep plenty of food supplies on hand at all times, placed
          as high as possible in your barn. Have copies of their records and
          photos which you can take with you for identification later. When
          the evacuation orders come down, label each animal with spray paint
          right on their body with your name and emergency phone number. The
          paint will not hurt them and will stay on even in the rain.
          Horses and livestock have better chances of survival if they are
          turned out in their pasture versus being closed up in a barn. While
          we may feel the urge to put them up in the barn to keep them from
          the storm, this presents many dangers and traps the animal if the
          building is damaged or in the event of a flood. Under no
          circumstances should any animal left to face a storm, including
          livestock or pets, be tied to any structure or placed in a stall or
          kennel with a roof on it. In the event of a flood these animals will
          not be able to swim or escape rising water.
          One month, three steps to prepare, a family to keep safe.
          AnimalHelp.Com challenges you to be ready this year, for your entire
          family. This month, get your family ready and help others get ready.
          Start with your family and then help your neighborhood. Talk to the
          pet owners and educate them. Develop a support system so that if
          someone is not home, or cannot get back to get their pets, someone
          else can. Have them designate a spot where all their "go" supplies
          will be for their pets, where their support person will know where
          to find everything. Once your neighborhood is ready, expand your
          efforts to include your whole town. Train your friends to train
          their friends. Keep it going and pass it forward. Education and
          preparation are key. Do not sit back and expect the federal or state
          governments - or anyone else for that matter - to come in and rescue
          your pets if you cannot put forth an effort to make arrangements for
          them before the disaster.

          This year let us not allow a hurricane to cause the loss of life we
          saw with Hurricane Katrina. Everything else is replaceable.
          Visit www.animalhelp. com during the month of May for more
          information, resources, supply lists, activities, flyers, posters,
          and materials you can use to help get prepared and help educate
          others.

          --
          Denise Marhoefer
          National News Correspondent
          Independent Investigative Journalist
          The Defense Foundation For Children USA
          www.defensefoundati onforchildren. com
          defensefoundation@ gmail.com
          http://www.blogtalk radio.com/ Justice1
          Miracles Of Hope Network www.miracles- of-hope.com
          Dedicated to the creation and restoration of good in the lives of
          children--
          Our Auction House
          http://www.the- promise-line. com/auction3. 1/
          http://www.squidoo. com/MiraclesOfHo peNetwork/
          Forum
          www.defensefoundati onforchildren. com/board/
          affiliate isp:http://www.isp. com/?defensefoun dation
          voicemail 765.381.1112
        • KatrinasAngelsinActionForum@yahoogroups.c
          ***Horse Transporters, please visit and add your service to the evacuation forums so that horse owners can contact you to set up their evacuation plans!!
          Message 4 of 11 , May 1, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            ***Horse Transporters, please visit and add your service to the
            evacuation forums so that horse owners can contact you to set up
            their evacuation plans!!

            AnimalHelp.Com is putting out a challenge to all horse pet owners
            to get ready for Hurricane season by making sure they have a plan in
            place, that includes their pets, before June 1st, 2007. Even if you
            don't live in a coastal area, disaster preparation for your pet is
            important so this information is great for any pet owner anywhere !
            By forwarding this email to other horse owners you know, you will
            help save lives and ensure that this year will not be such a tragedy
            as years past have been.

            ***Cross Posting and Forwarding Encouraged** **

            May 2007 � Hurricane Preparedness for Pets Challenge
            June 1st marks the start of the 2007 hurricane season. Are you
            ready? What about your pets? Do you have a plan?
            Now is the time to get ready � before hurricane season starts. Take
            the challenge: let 2007 be the year all of us who own pets are ready
            for hurricane season with an effective family plan in place. Do not
            ever think it will not happen to you. If you live in a coastal area,
            it CAN happen, and you must be ready.
            Jodi Beck Witte is no stranger to hurricanes. As a long time member
            of a federal veterinary disaster response team, she has seen her
            share, including Hurricane Katrina, Wilma, Rita, Jeanne, Frances,
            Charlie, and many others. "The common element is so many people who
            do not have plans for their animals and as a result, too many get
            left behind, or those pet owners will not evacuate because they
            won't leave their pets," said Ms Witte.
            The most notable example of the lack of preparedness came with
            Hurricane Katrina and the devastated animal population of Louisiana.
            Thousands of pets were left to die, despite hundreds of volunteers
            trying to save them after the fact. Nationwide outrage and blame was
            reported in the news directed toward FEMA and the government. In
            reality, at the most basic level, it was the pet owners who failed
            to prepare for the possibility of such an event. Since her federal
            deployment to New Orleans to help the animals left behind in the
            aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Ms Witte has spent considerable
            effort trying to educate the public about their preparedness needs.
            With the passing of the new PETS Act, all states are required to
            include pets and pet owners in their disaster plans. While this is a
            great step forward in animal disaster preparedness, Ms Witte
            encourages pet owners to completely understand how they are
            ultimately responsible for their pet's safety and evacuation in the
            event of a hurricane or other disaster. She offers the following
            information to help the pet owner prepare:
            Responsibility: It is not the job of FEMA, nor any federal, state,
            or local government entity to evacuate you or your pet before a
            disaster. While your local government may have transportation
            available for those who need it to local shelters, people come first
            and even if pets are allowed on these transports, the need may arise
            where precious space must be given to a person rather then an
            animal. The same holds true for shelter space. If you do not have a
            plan in place for your own animals, you can not expect others to
            take full responsibility for them. The responsibility is yours,
            first and foremost, as a pet owner.
            The Plan
            Where to Evacuate To: The first thing to set up your plan; have a
            safe location to evacuate to where you can take your pets. This may
            be a pet-friendly hotel, a relative or friend, or even a boarding
            facility well inland who can safely house your pet during the storm.
            You must arrange this location before hand, not when the evacuation
            orders come in. This month, before hurricane season begins, make
            contact with a hotel, boarding facility, or your relatives and make
            sure you will be welcome with little notice and wagging tails.
            Transportation: The second part of your plan to have in place is
            transportation. If you have pets, try hard not to rely on what will
            be an overburdened emergency response. If, at all possible, have
            your own transportation and make sure you can fit your family and
            all of your pets in that vehicle. It may take more then one vehicle
            to move the entire family � don't wait until the last moment to try
            to figure out how to make it work. Car Pooling with friends and
            neighbors may work well if you have planned together.
            The Supplies: The third part of your plan must be to have all
            necessary supplies on hand, ready to go, if an evacuation order
            comes down. These supplies are separate from the supplies you use
            with your pet everyday. These should be purchased and stored
            separately in an easily assessable place in the event of an
            emergency. Do not use these supplies for any other reason during the
            hurricane season.
            Your pets must have identification. Make sure that there is an
            alternate phone number on that ID where a message can be left. If
            the only phone number on the tag is your home phone number, it won't
            do your pet much good if you have been evacuated.
            Each dog must have a leash at the very minimum, and better yet has
            both a leash and a crate. Cats must have a crate or you can purchase
            a cardboard carrying box from your vet made just for cats. The crate
            will be necessary if you or your pet must stay in a shelter, and
            some hotels may require it. For small pocket pets such as gerbils
            and hamsters or birds, purchase small travel crates or plastic
            containers made for these little critters and available at your
            local pet store. Have them pre-labeled with the animal's ID. Photo
            copy all of your pet's current health records so you have proof of
            vaccination history. Take a couple photographs of each pet and place
            the records and photos all together in a waterproof container such
            as a zip lock baggie. Ask your veterinarian for an extra 2 week
            supply of any current drugs your pet may need if applicable.
            Purchase a 2 week supply of food, several gallons of water and have
            a food and water dish for each.
            For emergency storage, place each pet's emergency leash, food/water
            dishes, and emergency medications in their crate labeled with the
            pet's name and your contact information. Place these together with
            the food and water supplies, and the vet records, in an easily
            assessable place. These are your "go" supplies. You will be able to
            quickly evacuate with your pets if these are ready.
            Other Animals: Horses, cows, and other livestock present a serious
            challenge for evacuation. If you cannot evacuate these animals, be
            sure you keep plenty of food supplies on hand at all times, placed
            as high as possible in your barn. Have copies of their records and
            photos which you can take with you for identification later. When
            the evacuation orders come down, label each animal with spray paint
            right on their body with your name and emergency phone number. The
            paint will not hurt them and will stay on even in the rain.
            Horses and livestock have better chances of survival if they are
            turned out in their pasture versus being closed up in a barn. While
            we may feel the urge to put them up in the barn to keep them from
            the storm, this presents many dangers and traps the animal if the
            building is damaged or in the event of a flood. Under no
            circumstances should any animal left to face a storm, including
            livestock or pets, be tied to any structure or placed in a stall or
            kennel with a roof on it. In the event of a flood these animals will
            not be able to swim or escape rising water.
            One month, three steps to prepare, a family to keep safe.
            AnimalHelp.Com challenges you to be ready this year, for your entire
            family. This month, get your family ready and help others get ready.
            Start with your family and then help your neighborhood. Talk to the
            pet owners and educate them. Develop a support system so that if
            someone is not home, or cannot get back to get their pets, someone
            else can. Have them designate a spot where all their "go" supplies
            will be for their pets, where their support person will know where
            to find everything. Once your neighborhood is ready, expand your
            efforts to include your whole town. Train your friends to train
            their friends. Keep it going and pass it forward. Education and
            preparation are key. Do not sit back and expect the federal or state
            governments - or anyone else for that matter - to come in and rescue
            your pets if you cannot put forth an effort to make arrangements for
            them before the disaster.

            This year let us not allow a hurricane to cause the loss of life we
            saw with Hurricane Katrina. Everything else is replaceable.
            Visit www.animalhelp. com during the month of May for more
            information, resources, supply lists, activities, flyers, posters,
            and materials you can use to help get prepared and help educate
            others.

            --
            Denise Marhoefer
            National News Correspondent
            Independent Investigative Journalist
            The Defense Foundation For Children USA
            www.defensefoundati onforchildren. com
            defensefoundation@ gmail.com
            http://www.blogtalk radio.com/ Justice1
            Miracles Of Hope Network www.miracles- of-hope.com
            Dedicated to the creation and restoration of good in the lives of
            children--
            Our Auction House
            http://www.the- promise-line. com/auction3. 1/
            http://www.squidoo. com/MiraclesOfHo peNetwork/
            Forum
            www.defensefoundati onforchildren. com/board/
            affiliate isp:http://www.isp. com/?defensefoun dation
            voicemail 765.381.1112
          • KatrinasAngelsinActionForum@yahoogroups.c
            ***Horse Transporters, please visit and add your service to the evacuation forums so that horse owners can contact you to set up their evacuation plans!!
            Message 5 of 11 , Jun 1, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              ***Horse Transporters, please visit and add your service to the
              evacuation forums so that horse owners can contact you to set up
              their evacuation plans!!

              AnimalHelp.Com is putting out a challenge to all horse pet owners
              to get ready for Hurricane season by making sure they have a plan in
              place, that includes their pets, before June 1st, 2007. Even if you
              don't live in a coastal area, disaster preparation for your pet is
              important so this information is great for any pet owner anywhere !
              By forwarding this email to other horse owners you know, you will
              help save lives and ensure that this year will not be such a tragedy
              as years past have been.

              ***Cross Posting and Forwarding Encouraged** **

              May 2007 � Hurricane Preparedness for Pets Challenge
              June 1st marks the start of the 2007 hurricane season. Are you
              ready? What about your pets? Do you have a plan?
              Now is the time to get ready � before hurricane season starts. Take
              the challenge: let 2007 be the year all of us who own pets are ready
              for hurricane season with an effective family plan in place. Do not
              ever think it will not happen to you. If you live in a coastal area,
              it CAN happen, and you must be ready.
              Jodi Beck Witte is no stranger to hurricanes. As a long time member
              of a federal veterinary disaster response team, she has seen her
              share, including Hurricane Katrina, Wilma, Rita, Jeanne, Frances,
              Charlie, and many others. "The common element is so many people who
              do not have plans for their animals and as a result, too many get
              left behind, or those pet owners will not evacuate because they
              won't leave their pets," said Ms Witte.
              The most notable example of the lack of preparedness came with
              Hurricane Katrina and the devastated animal population of Louisiana.
              Thousands of pets were left to die, despite hundreds of volunteers
              trying to save them after the fact. Nationwide outrage and blame was
              reported in the news directed toward FEMA and the government. In
              reality, at the most basic level, it was the pet owners who failed
              to prepare for the possibility of such an event. Since her federal
              deployment to New Orleans to help the animals left behind in the
              aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Ms Witte has spent considerable
              effort trying to educate the public about their preparedness needs.
              With the passing of the new PETS Act, all states are required to
              include pets and pet owners in their disaster plans. While this is a
              great step forward in animal disaster preparedness, Ms Witte
              encourages pet owners to completely understand how they are
              ultimately responsible for their pet's safety and evacuation in the
              event of a hurricane or other disaster. She offers the following
              information to help the pet owner prepare:
              Responsibility: It is not the job of FEMA, nor any federal, state,
              or local government entity to evacuate you or your pet before a
              disaster. While your local government may have transportation
              available for those who need it to local shelters, people come first
              and even if pets are allowed on these transports, the need may arise
              where precious space must be given to a person rather then an
              animal. The same holds true for shelter space. If you do not have a
              plan in place for your own animals, you can not expect others to
              take full responsibility for them. The responsibility is yours,
              first and foremost, as a pet owner.
              The Plan
              Where to Evacuate To: The first thing to set up your plan; have a
              safe location to evacuate to where you can take your pets. This may
              be a pet-friendly hotel, a relative or friend, or even a boarding
              facility well inland who can safely house your pet during the storm.
              You must arrange this location before hand, not when the evacuation
              orders come in. This month, before hurricane season begins, make
              contact with a hotel, boarding facility, or your relatives and make
              sure you will be welcome with little notice and wagging tails.
              Transportation: The second part of your plan to have in place is
              transportation. If you have pets, try hard not to rely on what will
              be an overburdened emergency response. If, at all possible, have
              your own transportation and make sure you can fit your family and
              all of your pets in that vehicle. It may take more then one vehicle
              to move the entire family � don't wait until the last moment to try
              to figure out how to make it work. Car Pooling with friends and
              neighbors may work well if you have planned together.
              The Supplies: The third part of your plan must be to have all
              necessary supplies on hand, ready to go, if an evacuation order
              comes down. These supplies are separate from the supplies you use
              with your pet everyday. These should be purchased and stored
              separately in an easily assessable place in the event of an
              emergency. Do not use these supplies for any other reason during the
              hurricane season.
              Your pets must have identification. Make sure that there is an
              alternate phone number on that ID where a message can be left. If
              the only phone number on the tag is your home phone number, it won't
              do your pet much good if you have been evacuated.
              Each dog must have a leash at the very minimum, and better yet has
              both a leash and a crate. Cats must have a crate or you can purchase
              a cardboard carrying box from your vet made just for cats. The crate
              will be necessary if you or your pet must stay in a shelter, and
              some hotels may require it. For small pocket pets such as gerbils
              and hamsters or birds, purchase small travel crates or plastic
              containers made for these little critters and available at your
              local pet store. Have them pre-labeled with the animal's ID. Photo
              copy all of your pet's current health records so you have proof of
              vaccination history. Take a couple photographs of each pet and place
              the records and photos all together in a waterproof container such
              as a zip lock baggie. Ask your veterinarian for an extra 2 week
              supply of any current drugs your pet may need if applicable.
              Purchase a 2 week supply of food, several gallons of water and have
              a food and water dish for each.
              For emergency storage, place each pet's emergency leash, food/water
              dishes, and emergency medications in their crate labeled with the
              pet's name and your contact information. Place these together with
              the food and water supplies, and the vet records, in an easily
              assessable place. These are your "go" supplies. You will be able to
              quickly evacuate with your pets if these are ready.
              Other Animals: Horses, cows, and other livestock present a serious
              challenge for evacuation. If you cannot evacuate these animals, be
              sure you keep plenty of food supplies on hand at all times, placed
              as high as possible in your barn. Have copies of their records and
              photos which you can take with you for identification later. When
              the evacuation orders come down, label each animal with spray paint
              right on their body with your name and emergency phone number. The
              paint will not hurt them and will stay on even in the rain.
              Horses and livestock have better chances of survival if they are
              turned out in their pasture versus being closed up in a barn. While
              we may feel the urge to put them up in the barn to keep them from
              the storm, this presents many dangers and traps the animal if the
              building is damaged or in the event of a flood. Under no
              circumstances should any animal left to face a storm, including
              livestock or pets, be tied to any structure or placed in a stall or
              kennel with a roof on it. In the event of a flood these animals will
              not be able to swim or escape rising water.
              One month, three steps to prepare, a family to keep safe.
              AnimalHelp.Com challenges you to be ready this year, for your entire
              family. This month, get your family ready and help others get ready.
              Start with your family and then help your neighborhood. Talk to the
              pet owners and educate them. Develop a support system so that if
              someone is not home, or cannot get back to get their pets, someone
              else can. Have them designate a spot where all their "go" supplies
              will be for their pets, where their support person will know where
              to find everything. Once your neighborhood is ready, expand your
              efforts to include your whole town. Train your friends to train
              their friends. Keep it going and pass it forward. Education and
              preparation are key. Do not sit back and expect the federal or state
              governments - or anyone else for that matter - to come in and rescue
              your pets if you cannot put forth an effort to make arrangements for
              them before the disaster.

              This year let us not allow a hurricane to cause the loss of life we
              saw with Hurricane Katrina. Everything else is replaceable.
              Visit www.animalhelp. com during the month of May for more
              information, resources, supply lists, activities, flyers, posters,
              and materials you can use to help get prepared and help educate
              others.

              --
              Denise Marhoefer
              National News Correspondent
              Independent Investigative Journalist
              The Defense Foundation For Children USA
              www.defensefoundati onforchildren. com
              defensefoundation@ gmail.com
              http://www.blogtalk radio.com/ Justice1
              Miracles Of Hope Network www.miracles- of-hope.com
              Dedicated to the creation and restoration of good in the lives of
              children--
              Our Auction House
              http://www.the- promise-line. com/auction3. 1/
              http://www.squidoo. com/MiraclesOfHo peNetwork/
              Forum
              www.defensefoundati onforchildren. com/board/
              affiliate isp:http://www.isp. com/?defensefoun dation
              voicemail 765.381.1112
            • KatrinasAngelsinActionForum@yahoogroups.c
              ***Horse Transporters, please visit and add your service to the evacuation forums so that horse owners can contact you to set up their evacuation plans!!
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 1, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                ***Horse Transporters, please visit and add your service to the
                evacuation forums so that horse owners can contact you to set up
                their evacuation plans!!

                AnimalHelp.Com is putting out a challenge to all horse pet owners
                to get ready for Hurricane season by making sure they have a plan in
                place, that includes their pets, before June 1st, 2007. Even if you
                don't live in a coastal area, disaster preparation for your pet is
                important so this information is great for any pet owner anywhere !
                By forwarding this email to other horse owners you know, you will
                help save lives and ensure that this year will not be such a tragedy
                as years past have been.

                ***Cross Posting and Forwarding Encouraged** **

                May 2007 � Hurricane Preparedness for Pets Challenge
                June 1st marks the start of the 2007 hurricane season. Are you
                ready? What about your pets? Do you have a plan?
                Now is the time to get ready � before hurricane season starts. Take
                the challenge: let 2007 be the year all of us who own pets are ready
                for hurricane season with an effective family plan in place. Do not
                ever think it will not happen to you. If you live in a coastal area,
                it CAN happen, and you must be ready.
                Jodi Beck Witte is no stranger to hurricanes. As a long time member
                of a federal veterinary disaster response team, she has seen her
                share, including Hurricane Katrina, Wilma, Rita, Jeanne, Frances,
                Charlie, and many others. "The common element is so many people who
                do not have plans for their animals and as a result, too many get
                left behind, or those pet owners will not evacuate because they
                won't leave their pets," said Ms Witte.
                The most notable example of the lack of preparedness came with
                Hurricane Katrina and the devastated animal population of Louisiana.
                Thousands of pets were left to die, despite hundreds of volunteers
                trying to save them after the fact. Nationwide outrage and blame was
                reported in the news directed toward FEMA and the government. In
                reality, at the most basic level, it was the pet owners who failed
                to prepare for the possibility of such an event. Since her federal
                deployment to New Orleans to help the animals left behind in the
                aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Ms Witte has spent considerable
                effort trying to educate the public about their preparedness needs.
                With the passing of the new PETS Act, all states are required to
                include pets and pet owners in their disaster plans. While this is a
                great step forward in animal disaster preparedness, Ms Witte
                encourages pet owners to completely understand how they are
                ultimately responsible for their pet's safety and evacuation in the
                event of a hurricane or other disaster. She offers the following
                information to help the pet owner prepare:
                Responsibility: It is not the job of FEMA, nor any federal, state,
                or local government entity to evacuate you or your pet before a
                disaster. While your local government may have transportation
                available for those who need it to local shelters, people come first
                and even if pets are allowed on these transports, the need may arise
                where precious space must be given to a person rather then an
                animal. The same holds true for shelter space. If you do not have a
                plan in place for your own animals, you can not expect others to
                take full responsibility for them. The responsibility is yours,
                first and foremost, as a pet owner.
                The Plan
                Where to Evacuate To: The first thing to set up your plan; have a
                safe location to evacuate to where you can take your pets. This may
                be a pet-friendly hotel, a relative or friend, or even a boarding
                facility well inland who can safely house your pet during the storm.
                You must arrange this location before hand, not when the evacuation
                orders come in. This month, before hurricane season begins, make
                contact with a hotel, boarding facility, or your relatives and make
                sure you will be welcome with little notice and wagging tails.
                Transportation: The second part of your plan to have in place is
                transportation. If you have pets, try hard not to rely on what will
                be an overburdened emergency response. If, at all possible, have
                your own transportation and make sure you can fit your family and
                all of your pets in that vehicle. It may take more then one vehicle
                to move the entire family � don't wait until the last moment to try
                to figure out how to make it work. Car Pooling with friends and
                neighbors may work well if you have planned together.
                The Supplies: The third part of your plan must be to have all
                necessary supplies on hand, ready to go, if an evacuation order
                comes down. These supplies are separate from the supplies you use
                with your pet everyday. These should be purchased and stored
                separately in an easily assessable place in the event of an
                emergency. Do not use these supplies for any other reason during the
                hurricane season.
                Your pets must have identification. Make sure that there is an
                alternate phone number on that ID where a message can be left. If
                the only phone number on the tag is your home phone number, it won't
                do your pet much good if you have been evacuated.
                Each dog must have a leash at the very minimum, and better yet has
                both a leash and a crate. Cats must have a crate or you can purchase
                a cardboard carrying box from your vet made just for cats. The crate
                will be necessary if you or your pet must stay in a shelter, and
                some hotels may require it. For small pocket pets such as gerbils
                and hamsters or birds, purchase small travel crates or plastic
                containers made for these little critters and available at your
                local pet store. Have them pre-labeled with the animal's ID. Photo
                copy all of your pet's current health records so you have proof of
                vaccination history. Take a couple photographs of each pet and place
                the records and photos all together in a waterproof container such
                as a zip lock baggie. Ask your veterinarian for an extra 2 week
                supply of any current drugs your pet may need if applicable.
                Purchase a 2 week supply of food, several gallons of water and have
                a food and water dish for each.
                For emergency storage, place each pet's emergency leash, food/water
                dishes, and emergency medications in their crate labeled with the
                pet's name and your contact information. Place these together with
                the food and water supplies, and the vet records, in an easily
                assessable place. These are your "go" supplies. You will be able to
                quickly evacuate with your pets if these are ready.
                Other Animals: Horses, cows, and other livestock present a serious
                challenge for evacuation. If you cannot evacuate these animals, be
                sure you keep plenty of food supplies on hand at all times, placed
                as high as possible in your barn. Have copies of their records and
                photos which you can take with you for identification later. When
                the evacuation orders come down, label each animal with spray paint
                right on their body with your name and emergency phone number. The
                paint will not hurt them and will stay on even in the rain.
                Horses and livestock have better chances of survival if they are
                turned out in their pasture versus being closed up in a barn. While
                we may feel the urge to put them up in the barn to keep them from
                the storm, this presents many dangers and traps the animal if the
                building is damaged or in the event of a flood. Under no
                circumstances should any animal left to face a storm, including
                livestock or pets, be tied to any structure or placed in a stall or
                kennel with a roof on it. In the event of a flood these animals will
                not be able to swim or escape rising water.
                One month, three steps to prepare, a family to keep safe.
                AnimalHelp.Com challenges you to be ready this year, for your entire
                family. This month, get your family ready and help others get ready.
                Start with your family and then help your neighborhood. Talk to the
                pet owners and educate them. Develop a support system so that if
                someone is not home, or cannot get back to get their pets, someone
                else can. Have them designate a spot where all their "go" supplies
                will be for their pets, where their support person will know where
                to find everything. Once your neighborhood is ready, expand your
                efforts to include your whole town. Train your friends to train
                their friends. Keep it going and pass it forward. Education and
                preparation are key. Do not sit back and expect the federal or state
                governments - or anyone else for that matter - to come in and rescue
                your pets if you cannot put forth an effort to make arrangements for
                them before the disaster.

                This year let us not allow a hurricane to cause the loss of life we
                saw with Hurricane Katrina. Everything else is replaceable.
                Visit www.animalhelp. com during the month of May for more
                information, resources, supply lists, activities, flyers, posters,
                and materials you can use to help get prepared and help educate
                others.

                --
                Denise Marhoefer
                National News Correspondent
                Independent Investigative Journalist
                The Defense Foundation For Children USA
                www.defensefoundati onforchildren. com
                defensefoundation@ gmail.com
                http://www.blogtalk radio.com/ Justice1
                Miracles Of Hope Network www.miracles- of-hope.com
                Dedicated to the creation and restoration of good in the lives of
                children--
                Our Auction House
                http://www.the- promise-line. com/auction3. 1/
                http://www.squidoo. com/MiraclesOfHo peNetwork/
                Forum
                www.defensefoundati onforchildren. com/board/
                affiliate isp:http://www.isp. com/?defensefoun dation
                voicemail 765.381.1112
              • KatrinasAngelsinActionForum@yahoogroups.c
                ***Horse Transporters, please visit and add your service to the evacuation forums so that horse owners can contact you to set up their evacuation plans!!
                Message 7 of 11 , Aug 1, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  ***Horse Transporters, please visit and add your service to the
                  evacuation forums so that horse owners can contact you to set up
                  their evacuation plans!!

                  AnimalHelp.Com is putting out a challenge to all horse pet owners
                  to get ready for Hurricane season by making sure they have a plan in
                  place, that includes their pets, before June 1st, 2007. Even if you
                  don't live in a coastal area, disaster preparation for your pet is
                  important so this information is great for any pet owner anywhere !
                  By forwarding this email to other horse owners you know, you will
                  help save lives and ensure that this year will not be such a tragedy
                  as years past have been.

                  ***Cross Posting and Forwarding Encouraged** **

                  May 2007 � Hurricane Preparedness for Pets Challenge
                  June 1st marks the start of the 2007 hurricane season. Are you
                  ready? What about your pets? Do you have a plan?
                  Now is the time to get ready � before hurricane season starts. Take
                  the challenge: let 2007 be the year all of us who own pets are ready
                  for hurricane season with an effective family plan in place. Do not
                  ever think it will not happen to you. If you live in a coastal area,
                  it CAN happen, and you must be ready.
                  Jodi Beck Witte is no stranger to hurricanes. As a long time member
                  of a federal veterinary disaster response team, she has seen her
                  share, including Hurricane Katrina, Wilma, Rita, Jeanne, Frances,
                  Charlie, and many others. "The common element is so many people who
                  do not have plans for their animals and as a result, too many get
                  left behind, or those pet owners will not evacuate because they
                  won't leave their pets," said Ms Witte.
                  The most notable example of the lack of preparedness came with
                  Hurricane Katrina and the devastated animal population of Louisiana.
                  Thousands of pets were left to die, despite hundreds of volunteers
                  trying to save them after the fact. Nationwide outrage and blame was
                  reported in the news directed toward FEMA and the government. In
                  reality, at the most basic level, it was the pet owners who failed
                  to prepare for the possibility of such an event. Since her federal
                  deployment to New Orleans to help the animals left behind in the
                  aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Ms Witte has spent considerable
                  effort trying to educate the public about their preparedness needs.
                  With the passing of the new PETS Act, all states are required to
                  include pets and pet owners in their disaster plans. While this is a
                  great step forward in animal disaster preparedness, Ms Witte
                  encourages pet owners to completely understand how they are
                  ultimately responsible for their pet's safety and evacuation in the
                  event of a hurricane or other disaster. She offers the following
                  information to help the pet owner prepare:
                  Responsibility: It is not the job of FEMA, nor any federal, state,
                  or local government entity to evacuate you or your pet before a
                  disaster. While your local government may have transportation
                  available for those who need it to local shelters, people come first
                  and even if pets are allowed on these transports, the need may arise
                  where precious space must be given to a person rather then an
                  animal. The same holds true for shelter space. If you do not have a
                  plan in place for your own animals, you can not expect others to
                  take full responsibility for them. The responsibility is yours,
                  first and foremost, as a pet owner.
                  The Plan
                  Where to Evacuate To: The first thing to set up your plan; have a
                  safe location to evacuate to where you can take your pets. This may
                  be a pet-friendly hotel, a relative or friend, or even a boarding
                  facility well inland who can safely house your pet during the storm.
                  You must arrange this location before hand, not when the evacuation
                  orders come in. This month, before hurricane season begins, make
                  contact with a hotel, boarding facility, or your relatives and make
                  sure you will be welcome with little notice and wagging tails.
                  Transportation: The second part of your plan to have in place is
                  transportation. If you have pets, try hard not to rely on what will
                  be an overburdened emergency response. If, at all possible, have
                  your own transportation and make sure you can fit your family and
                  all of your pets in that vehicle. It may take more then one vehicle
                  to move the entire family � don't wait until the last moment to try
                  to figure out how to make it work. Car Pooling with friends and
                  neighbors may work well if you have planned together.
                  The Supplies: The third part of your plan must be to have all
                  necessary supplies on hand, ready to go, if an evacuation order
                  comes down. These supplies are separate from the supplies you use
                  with your pet everyday. These should be purchased and stored
                  separately in an easily assessable place in the event of an
                  emergency. Do not use these supplies for any other reason during the
                  hurricane season.
                  Your pets must have identification. Make sure that there is an
                  alternate phone number on that ID where a message can be left. If
                  the only phone number on the tag is your home phone number, it won't
                  do your pet much good if you have been evacuated.
                  Each dog must have a leash at the very minimum, and better yet has
                  both a leash and a crate. Cats must have a crate or you can purchase
                  a cardboard carrying box from your vet made just for cats. The crate
                  will be necessary if you or your pet must stay in a shelter, and
                  some hotels may require it. For small pocket pets such as gerbils
                  and hamsters or birds, purchase small travel crates or plastic
                  containers made for these little critters and available at your
                  local pet store. Have them pre-labeled with the animal's ID. Photo
                  copy all of your pet's current health records so you have proof of
                  vaccination history. Take a couple photographs of each pet and place
                  the records and photos all together in a waterproof container such
                  as a zip lock baggie. Ask your veterinarian for an extra 2 week
                  supply of any current drugs your pet may need if applicable.
                  Purchase a 2 week supply of food, several gallons of water and have
                  a food and water dish for each.
                  For emergency storage, place each pet's emergency leash, food/water
                  dishes, and emergency medications in their crate labeled with the
                  pet's name and your contact information. Place these together with
                  the food and water supplies, and the vet records, in an easily
                  assessable place. These are your "go" supplies. You will be able to
                  quickly evacuate with your pets if these are ready.
                  Other Animals: Horses, cows, and other livestock present a serious
                  challenge for evacuation. If you cannot evacuate these animals, be
                  sure you keep plenty of food supplies on hand at all times, placed
                  as high as possible in your barn. Have copies of their records and
                  photos which you can take with you for identification later. When
                  the evacuation orders come down, label each animal with spray paint
                  right on their body with your name and emergency phone number. The
                  paint will not hurt them and will stay on even in the rain.
                  Horses and livestock have better chances of survival if they are
                  turned out in their pasture versus being closed up in a barn. While
                  we may feel the urge to put them up in the barn to keep them from
                  the storm, this presents many dangers and traps the animal if the
                  building is damaged or in the event of a flood. Under no
                  circumstances should any animal left to face a storm, including
                  livestock or pets, be tied to any structure or placed in a stall or
                  kennel with a roof on it. In the event of a flood these animals will
                  not be able to swim or escape rising water.
                  One month, three steps to prepare, a family to keep safe.
                  AnimalHelp.Com challenges you to be ready this year, for your entire
                  family. This month, get your family ready and help others get ready.
                  Start with your family and then help your neighborhood. Talk to the
                  pet owners and educate them. Develop a support system so that if
                  someone is not home, or cannot get back to get their pets, someone
                  else can. Have them designate a spot where all their "go" supplies
                  will be for their pets, where their support person will know where
                  to find everything. Once your neighborhood is ready, expand your
                  efforts to include your whole town. Train your friends to train
                  their friends. Keep it going and pass it forward. Education and
                  preparation are key. Do not sit back and expect the federal or state
                  governments - or anyone else for that matter - to come in and rescue
                  your pets if you cannot put forth an effort to make arrangements for
                  them before the disaster.

                  This year let us not allow a hurricane to cause the loss of life we
                  saw with Hurricane Katrina. Everything else is replaceable.
                  Visit www.animalhelp. com during the month of May for more
                  information, resources, supply lists, activities, flyers, posters,
                  and materials you can use to help get prepared and help educate
                  others.

                  --
                  Denise Marhoefer
                  National News Correspondent
                  Independent Investigative Journalist
                  The Defense Foundation For Children USA
                  www.defensefoundati onforchildren. com
                  defensefoundation@ gmail.com
                  http://www.blogtalk radio.com/ Justice1
                  Miracles Of Hope Network www.miracles- of-hope.com
                  Dedicated to the creation and restoration of good in the lives of
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