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Re: [KWChoir] Re: learning files for Pennsic Choir

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  • Janet Ryan
    I also had reasonable success playing the midi files on the computer (one with reasonably decent speakers) and recording that on the voice recorder feature of
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 1, 2011
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      I also had reasonable success playing the midi files on the computer (one with reasonably decent speakers) and recording that on the voice recorder feature of the mp3 player.  This wasn't just because I didn't know offhand how to convert the files, but because I wanted to speak the words in rhythm with the music and record it for working on songs in the car when I'm not looking at the pages.  It worked ok.  Now, if only someone who speaks Hebrew will do that with Al Naharot!  Maybe Erlan will pay someone in sheep and cattle for doing that?  BTW, I notice my mp3 player creates .wav files when it records!  And I found that in windows, I didn't find the same options for editing the summary under properties as I can do with an mp3 file.  For an mp3 file, I can edit properties and assign stuff like album, artist and genre, by which I can browse the music list in the mp3 player.  So I still should get around to converting stuff.
      Alison

      --- On Fri, 6/24/11, Margrett Norwoode <mistressmargrett@...> wrote:

      From: Margrett Norwoode <mistressmargrett@...>
      Subject: Re: [KWChoir] Re: learning files for Pennsic Choir
      To: KWChoir@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Friday, June 24, 2011, 10:21 AM

       
      I use PrintMusic when helping Teleri with Court & Country songs--it's the baby brother or sister of Finale LOL.
       
      And the easiest way to convert midis to mp3s is via iTunes, if you use it. If you sent your preferences for mp3s, you can convert the files without any other software.
       
      Margrett


      From: Jennifer Friedman <jennifer-friedman@...>
      To: KWChoir@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Fri, June 24, 2011 9:17:49 AM
      Subject: Re: [KWChoir] Re: learning files for Pennsic Choir

       
      I would like to chime in and say that Anonney's technique is really similar to what I do, except I tend to do individual parts alone (I copy a line from the piece, open a new file, paste it in, export to MIDI) because that's what I've been asked for in the past. Noteworthy Composer is the best value in music, in my opinion, and I've had it for maybe 15 years; besides being a terrific music product for a fraction of what you'd pay for a professional suite like Finale, when you pay for it, you get free upgrades forever.  . . .
       
      Converting: I have not had to convert files from MIDI to mp3, but a cursory Google search on "midi to mp3" brings up lots of software and help sites to do this.
       . . .
       
      Happy browsing,
       
      Eliane
        . . .
    • dross92
      Two comments: 1. Janet s generating a file where she is speaking her words in rhythm to her line is an excellent learning tool, one which I have witnessed
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 3, 2011
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        Two comments:
        1. Janet's generating a file where she is speaking her words in rhythm to her line is an excellent learning tool, one which I have witnessed first hand while traveling to events. It's hands free, indeed!
        2. I own both NoteWorthy and PrintMusic, but find I employ NWC almost exclusively. One major reason is because of its free player program called NoteWorthy Composer Viewer which will load, play, and print NoteWorthy Composer (*.nwc) files without needing conversion.
        - Purchase of Composer is NOT required to use the Viewer.
        - Viewer is a separate (free) download at their web site.
        - The (*.nwc) files are small and can be sent via email or posted for review/print which is useful during developmental stages, especially when working across composition program platforms.
        - Note: The (*.nwc) files cannot be edited in Viewer, just played & printed.


        --- In KWChoir@yahoogroups.com, Janet Ryan <jsr2729@...> wrote:
        >
        > I also had reasonable success playing the midi files on the computer (one with reasonably decent speakers) and recording that on the voice recorder feature of the mp3 player.  This wasn't just because I didn't know offhand how to convert the files, but because I wanted to speak the words in rhythm with the music and record it for working on songs in the car when I'm not looking at the pages.  It worked ok.  Now, if only someone who speaks Hebrew will do that with Al Naharot!  Maybe Erlan will pay someone in sheep and cattle for doing that?  BTW, I notice my mp3 player creates .wav files when it records!  And I found that in windows, I didn't find the same options for editing the summary under properties as I can do with an mp3 file.  For an mp3 file, I can edit properties and assign stuff like album, artist and genre, by which I can browse the music list in the mp3 player.  So I still should get around to converting stuff.
        > Alison
        >
        > --- On Fri, 6/24/11, Margrett Norwoode <mistressmargrett@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > From: Margrett Norwoode <mistressmargrett@...>
        > Subject: Re: [KWChoir] Re: learning files for Pennsic Choir
        > To: KWChoir@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Friday, June 24, 2011, 10:21 AM
        >
        >
        >  
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > I use PrintMusic when helping Teleri with Court & Country songs--it's the baby brother or sister of Finale LOL.
        >  
        > And the easiest way to convert midis to mp3s is via iTunes, if you use it. If you sent your preferences for mp3s, you can convert the files without any other software.
        >  
        > Margrett
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > From: Jennifer Friedman <jennifer-friedman@...>
        > To: KWChoir@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Fri, June 24, 2011 9:17:49 AM
        > Subject: Re: [KWChoir] Re: learning files for Pennsic Choir
        >
        >  
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > I would like to chime in and say that Anonney's technique is really similar to what I do, except I tend to do individual parts alone (I copy a line from the piece, open a new file, paste it in, export to MIDI) because that's what I've been asked for in the past. Noteworthy Composer is the best value in music, in my opinion, and I've had it for maybe 15 years; besides being a terrific music product for a fraction of what you'd pay for a professional suite like Finale, when you pay for it, you get free upgrades forever.  . . .
        >  
        > Converting: I have not had to convert files from MIDI to mp3, but a cursory Google search on "midi to mp3" brings up lots of software and help sites to do this.
        >  . . .
        >  
        > Happy browsing,
        >  
        > Eliane
        >   . . .
        >
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