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Re: [KWChoir] learning files for Pennsic Choir

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  • Margrett Norwoode
    I would very much appreciate mp3 files. I do a lot of music prepping with my car CD player and my personal mp3 player. Margrett
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 23, 2011
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      I would very much appreciate mp3 files. I do a lot of music prepping with my car CD player and my personal mp3 player.
       
      Margrett


      From: dsrubin2004 <dsrubin2004@...>
      To: KWChoir@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thu, June 23, 2011 1:19:41 PM
      Subject: [KWChoir] learning files for Pennsic Choir

       

      Folks,

      I made the learning files for this year's choir in midi format as they are much smaller and easier to upload/download. However, midi files won't play on a CD player or an MP3 player. I CAN convert the files to MP3 format and upload those files if there is a desire amongst the community (and room in the group's files folder). These are much larger files but more useful.....

      What sayest everyone?

      Dave Rubin/Robyn Solarius

    • Krege, Barbara B
      I too would very much appreciate the mp3 files. I am technologically challenged and in the previous 2 years at Pennsic, relied on listening to my mp3 player
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 23, 2011
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        I too would very much appreciate the mp3 files.  I am technologically challenged and in the previous 2 years at Pennsic, relied on listening to my mp3 player for getting my notes right.  Thank you for considering it and I really hope you do this.

         

        Jayne Barber, Outlands


        From: KWChoir@yahoogroups.com [KWChoir@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Margrett Norwoode [mistressmargrett@...]
        Sent: Thursday, June 23, 2011 12:22 PM
        To: KWChoir@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [KWChoir] learning files for Pennsic Choir

         

        I would very much appreciate mp3 files. I do a lot of music prepping with my car CD player and my personal mp3 player.
         
        Margrett


        From: dsrubin2004 <dsrubin2004@...>
        To: KWChoir@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thu, June 23, 2011 1:19:41 PM
        Subject: [KWChoir] learning files for Pennsic Choir

         

        Folks,

        I made the learning files for this year's choir in midi format as they are much smaller and easier to upload/download. However, midi files won't play on a CD player or an MP3 player. I CAN convert the files to MP3 format and upload those files if there is a desire amongst the community (and room in the group's files folder). These are much larger files but more useful.....

        What sayest everyone?

        Dave Rubin/Robyn Solarius

      • annoney@aol.com
        I use NoteWorthy Composer to make learning files. In playback, you can watch the notes change color so you can follow along. Some people started to learn
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 24, 2011
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          I use NoteWorthy Composer to make learning files.  In playback, you can watch the notes change color so you can follow along.  Some people started to learn to read music by watching the notes go up and down the line and which kind of notes are held longer than others. It also has the ability to playback dynamics. NoteWorthy files are only a few kilobytes and NoteWorthy has a free viewer for playback.
           
          Here is what I do.  I make a file with every note in it.  Each part on it's own line.  I pick a different instrument for playback of each part so the ear can find it's part in the whole. I save this file.  Then I reopen and adjust the playback volume of the parts.  I will start of by leaving the volume of the soprano part the same and then reduce the other parts and any accompaniment to 1/4 the volume of the soprano part.  Then save this file with Sop on the end of the file name.  Then I reduce the volume of the soprano part and increase the volume of the alto and save it with Alto at the end of the file name.  I continue for each part.  The reason I do not completely mute the other parts, I believe you need to hear the other parts to learn any dissonances and get entrances and cues from the other parts.
           
          Then I send these files to everyone in the group and they can play them back on their computer.  But at work most people are not allowed to download the NoteWorthy viewer so I can easily export to midi all the files.  My husband has worked out how to convert the NoteWothy files to audio files to make a CD to play in the car.  Old CD players cannot play MP3 files.
           
          The downside is someone has to fork over the $52.00 to get the NoteWorthy Composer program.  At first it took a long time to get the music in, but after getting familiar with the keyboard shortcuts, I was able to do the whole Hallelujah Chorus with all the piano accompaniment in 6 hours.
           
          I have already made lots of files of lots of music.  If you have a song in mind, ask me and I'll see if I have it.
           
          Theresa
          aka Annoney
           
           
           
        • Jennifer Friedman
          I would like to chime in and say that Anonney s technique is really similar to what I do, except I tend to do individual parts alone (I copy a line from
          Message 4 of 9 , Jun 24, 2011
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            I would like to chime in and say that Anonney's technique is really similar to what I do, except I tend to do individual parts alone (I copy a line from the piece, open a new file, paste it in, export to MIDI) because that's what I've been asked for in the past. Noteworthy Composer is the best value in music, in my opinion, and I've had it for maybe 15 years; besides being a terrific music product for a fraction of what you'd pay for a professional suite like Finale, when you pay for it, you get free upgrades forever. So, I think I paid $30 in 1999, and every time I get a new computer, I just download the newest version. Even if you don't read music, it's not hard to learn to enter melodies so they sound right to you, and I've witnessed people watching the playback and having light bulbs go on over their heads: "Oh, it goes up on the staff when the note is higher...!" Really good learning tool.
             
            Converting: I have not had to convert files from MIDI to mp3, but a cursory Google search on "midi to mp3" brings up lots of software and help sites to do this.
             
            I would also like to mention the Choral Public Domain Library, www.cpdl.org, which has a LOT of SCA period music. When our local SCA choir picks up a new piece of music, chances are it's available in some format on CPDL. When you go to a piece's page, it lists the editions it has and gives linked icons for various file formats you can view/hear/download, usually PDF, often MIDI, often NWC (Noteworthy Composer), and other less common formats. Much is hosted at CPDL, but many more things are hosted around the Web and simply linked there; via CPDL you can find some real treasure troves of music files. (You can even import a MIDI file to Noteworthy, though it's not foolproof, and of course if you do this in order to make custom learning files, you cannot sell them, and you should give credit to the person who originally worked on the electronic edition.)
             
            Happy browsing,
             
            Eliane
             
             
             
            Eliane Halevy, OL
            Barony of Jararvellir, Kingdom of Northshield
            Jennifer Friedman, 4630 Mineral Point Rd., Madison, WI 53705
            (608) 238-7627, jennifer-friedman@..., www.gflower.org


            From: "annoney@..." <annoney@...>
            To: KWChoir@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Fri, June 24, 2011 7:51:28 AM
            Subject: [KWChoir] Re: learning files for Pennsic Choir

             

            I use NoteWorthy Composer to make learning files.  In playback, you can watch the notes change color so you can follow along.  Some people started to learn to read music by watching the notes go up and down the line and which kind of notes are held longer than others. It also has the ability to playback dynamics. NoteWorthy files are only a few kilobytes and NoteWorthy has a free viewer for playback.
             
            Here is what I do.  I make a file with every note in it.  Each part on it's own line.  I pick a different instrument for playback of each part so the ear can find it's part in the whole. I save this file.  Then I reopen and adjust the playback volume of the parts.  I will start of by leaving the volume of the soprano part the same and then reduce the other parts and any accompaniment to 1/4 the volume of the soprano part.  Then save this file with Sop on the end of the file name.  Then I reduce the volume of the soprano part and increase the volume of the alto and save it with Alto at the end of the file name.  I continue for each part.  The reason I do not completely mute the other parts, I believe you need to hear the other parts to learn any dissonances and get entrances and cues from the other parts.
             
            Then I send these files to everyone in the group and they can play them back on their computer.  But at work most people are not allowed to download the NoteWorthy viewer so I can easily export to midi all the files.  My husband has worked out how to convert the NoteWothy files to audio files to make a CD to play in the car.  Old CD players cannot play MP3 files.
             
            The downside is someone has to fork over the $52.00 to get the NoteWorthy Composer program.  At first it took a long time to get the music in, but after getting familiar with the keyboard shortcuts, I was able to do the whole Hallelujah Chorus with all the piano accompaniment in 6 hours.
             
            I have already made lots of files of lots of music.  If you have a song in mind, ask me and I'll see if I have it.
             
            Theresa
            aka Annoney
             
             
             
          • Margrett Norwoode
            I use PrintMusic when helping Teleri with Court & Country songs--it s the baby brother or sister of Finale LOL. And the easiest way to convert midis to mp3s is
            Message 5 of 9 , Jun 24, 2011
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              I use PrintMusic when helping Teleri with Court & Country songs--it's the baby brother or sister of Finale LOL.
               
              And the easiest way to convert midis to mp3s is via iTunes, if you use it. If you sent your preferences for mp3s, you can convert the files without any other software.
               
              Margrett


              From: Jennifer Friedman <jennifer-friedman@...>
              To: KWChoir@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Fri, June 24, 2011 9:17:49 AM
              Subject: Re: [KWChoir] Re: learning files for Pennsic Choir

               

              I would like to chime in and say that Anonney's technique is really similar to what I do, except I tend to do individual parts alone (I copy a line from the piece, open a new file, paste it in, export to MIDI) because that's what I've been asked for in the past. Noteworthy Composer is the best value in music, in my opinion, and I've had it for maybe 15 years; besides being a terrific music product for a fraction of what you'd pay for a professional suite like Finale, when you pay for it, you get free upgrades forever.  . . .
               
              Converting: I have not had to convert files from MIDI to mp3, but a cursory Google search on "midi to mp3" brings up lots of software and help sites to do this.
               . . .
               
              Happy browsing,
               
              Eliane
                . . .
            • Stephen Church
              Same here, I use Finale PrintMusic, mainly because you can use it with Finale Reader, which is a free download anyone can get and Finale Reader reads/plays the
              Message 6 of 9 , Jun 24, 2011
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                Same here, I use Finale PrintMusic, mainly because you can use it with Finale Reader, which is a free download anyone can get and Finale Reader reads/plays the parts in tune, with or without the other parts, and with the right tempo.

                Morien


                From: Margrett Norwoode <mistressmargrett@...>
                To: KWChoir@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Friday, June 24, 2011 10:21 AM
                Subject: Re: [KWChoir] Re: learning files for Pennsic Choir

                 
                I use PrintMusic when helping Teleri with Court & Country songs--it's the baby brother or sister of Finale LOL.
                 
                And the easiest way to convert midis to mp3s is via iTunes, if you use it. If you sent your preferences for mp3s, you can convert the files without any other software.
                 
                Margrett


                From: Jennifer Friedman <jennifer-friedman@...>
                To: KWChoir@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Fri, June 24, 2011 9:17:49 AM
                Subject: Re: [KWChoir] Re: learning files for Pennsic Choir

                 
                I would like to chime in and say that Anonney's technique is really similar to what I do, except I tend to do individual parts alone (I copy a line from the piece, open a new file, paste it in, export to MIDI) because that's what I've been asked for in the past. Noteworthy Composer is the best value in music, in my opinion, and I've had it for maybe 15 years; besides being a terrific music product for a fraction of what you'd pay for a professional suite like Finale, when you pay for it, you get free upgrades forever.  . . .
                 
                Converting: I have not had to convert files from MIDI to mp3, but a cursory Google search on "midi to mp3" brings up lots of software and help sites to do this.
                 . . .
                 
                Happy browsing,
                 
                Eliane
                  . . .


              • Janet Ryan
                I also had reasonable success playing the midi files on the computer (one with reasonably decent speakers) and recording that on the voice recorder feature of
                Message 7 of 9 , Jul 1, 2011
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                  I also had reasonable success playing the midi files on the computer (one with reasonably decent speakers) and recording that on the voice recorder feature of the mp3 player.  This wasn't just because I didn't know offhand how to convert the files, but because I wanted to speak the words in rhythm with the music and record it for working on songs in the car when I'm not looking at the pages.  It worked ok.  Now, if only someone who speaks Hebrew will do that with Al Naharot!  Maybe Erlan will pay someone in sheep and cattle for doing that?  BTW, I notice my mp3 player creates .wav files when it records!  And I found that in windows, I didn't find the same options for editing the summary under properties as I can do with an mp3 file.  For an mp3 file, I can edit properties and assign stuff like album, artist and genre, by which I can browse the music list in the mp3 player.  So I still should get around to converting stuff.
                  Alison

                  --- On Fri, 6/24/11, Margrett Norwoode <mistressmargrett@...> wrote:

                  From: Margrett Norwoode <mistressmargrett@...>
                  Subject: Re: [KWChoir] Re: learning files for Pennsic Choir
                  To: KWChoir@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Friday, June 24, 2011, 10:21 AM

                   
                  I use PrintMusic when helping Teleri with Court & Country songs--it's the baby brother or sister of Finale LOL.
                   
                  And the easiest way to convert midis to mp3s is via iTunes, if you use it. If you sent your preferences for mp3s, you can convert the files without any other software.
                   
                  Margrett


                  From: Jennifer Friedman <jennifer-friedman@...>
                  To: KWChoir@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Fri, June 24, 2011 9:17:49 AM
                  Subject: Re: [KWChoir] Re: learning files for Pennsic Choir

                   
                  I would like to chime in and say that Anonney's technique is really similar to what I do, except I tend to do individual parts alone (I copy a line from the piece, open a new file, paste it in, export to MIDI) because that's what I've been asked for in the past. Noteworthy Composer is the best value in music, in my opinion, and I've had it for maybe 15 years; besides being a terrific music product for a fraction of what you'd pay for a professional suite like Finale, when you pay for it, you get free upgrades forever.  . . .
                   
                  Converting: I have not had to convert files from MIDI to mp3, but a cursory Google search on "midi to mp3" brings up lots of software and help sites to do this.
                   . . .
                   
                  Happy browsing,
                   
                  Eliane
                    . . .
                • dross92
                  Two comments: 1. Janet s generating a file where she is speaking her words in rhythm to her line is an excellent learning tool, one which I have witnessed
                  Message 8 of 9 , Jul 3, 2011
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                    Two comments:
                    1. Janet's generating a file where she is speaking her words in rhythm to her line is an excellent learning tool, one which I have witnessed first hand while traveling to events. It's hands free, indeed!
                    2. I own both NoteWorthy and PrintMusic, but find I employ NWC almost exclusively. One major reason is because of its free player program called NoteWorthy Composer Viewer which will load, play, and print NoteWorthy Composer (*.nwc) files without needing conversion.
                    - Purchase of Composer is NOT required to use the Viewer.
                    - Viewer is a separate (free) download at their web site.
                    - The (*.nwc) files are small and can be sent via email or posted for review/print which is useful during developmental stages, especially when working across composition program platforms.
                    - Note: The (*.nwc) files cannot be edited in Viewer, just played & printed.


                    --- In KWChoir@yahoogroups.com, Janet Ryan <jsr2729@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I also had reasonable success playing the midi files on the computer (one with reasonably decent speakers) and recording that on the voice recorder feature of the mp3 player.  This wasn't just because I didn't know offhand how to convert the files, but because I wanted to speak the words in rhythm with the music and record it for working on songs in the car when I'm not looking at the pages.  It worked ok.  Now, if only someone who speaks Hebrew will do that with Al Naharot!  Maybe Erlan will pay someone in sheep and cattle for doing that?  BTW, I notice my mp3 player creates .wav files when it records!  And I found that in windows, I didn't find the same options for editing the summary under properties as I can do with an mp3 file.  For an mp3 file, I can edit properties and assign stuff like album, artist and genre, by which I can browse the music list in the mp3 player.  So I still should get around to converting stuff.
                    > Alison
                    >
                    > --- On Fri, 6/24/11, Margrett Norwoode <mistressmargrett@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > From: Margrett Norwoode <mistressmargrett@...>
                    > Subject: Re: [KWChoir] Re: learning files for Pennsic Choir
                    > To: KWChoir@yahoogroups.com
                    > Date: Friday, June 24, 2011, 10:21 AM
                    >
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > I use PrintMusic when helping Teleri with Court & Country songs--it's the baby brother or sister of Finale LOL.
                    >  
                    > And the easiest way to convert midis to mp3s is via iTunes, if you use it. If you sent your preferences for mp3s, you can convert the files without any other software.
                    >  
                    > Margrett
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > From: Jennifer Friedman <jennifer-friedman@...>
                    > To: KWChoir@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Fri, June 24, 2011 9:17:49 AM
                    > Subject: Re: [KWChoir] Re: learning files for Pennsic Choir
                    >
                    >  
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > I would like to chime in and say that Anonney's technique is really similar to what I do, except I tend to do individual parts alone (I copy a line from the piece, open a new file, paste it in, export to MIDI) because that's what I've been asked for in the past. Noteworthy Composer is the best value in music, in my opinion, and I've had it for maybe 15 years; besides being a terrific music product for a fraction of what you'd pay for a professional suite like Finale, when you pay for it, you get free upgrades forever.  . . .
                    >  
                    > Converting: I have not had to convert files from MIDI to mp3, but a cursory Google search on "midi to mp3" brings up lots of software and help sites to do this.
                    >  . . .
                    >  
                    > Happy browsing,
                    >  
                    > Eliane
                    >   . . .
                    >
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