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Pennsic Choir for 2009

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  • Karen Kasper
    Greetings Known World Singers!   The KWC list has been pretty quiet for a while so I thought I would liven things up a bit. :-)   After a bit of
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 8, 2008
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      Greetings Known World Singers!
       
      The KWC list has been pretty quiet for a while so I thought I would liven things up a bit. :-)
       
      After a bit of brainstorming, we have a theme for next Pennsic: Astronomy!
       
      2009 is the International Year of Astronomy, in celebration of the 400th anniversary of both Galileo's work with the telescope and of the publication of Kepler's Astronomia Nova.
       
      Since I haven't found any choral works about Galileo or Kepler themselves, we'll be singing pieces about stars, planets, the moon, the sun and anything else that might be bent to our theme. Though, I'm still mulling over whether "Tan Ta Ra Cried Mars" qualifies. :-) I have a fair number of pieces in the running so far, including Weelkes' "Thule, the Period of Cosmography", Michael East's "Hence Stars" and "Parmi di Star" by Severin Cornet. Your suggestions on pieces that fit this theme are welcome! Once the final selections are made, I'll post them to the Yahoo Group as usual.
       
      Also, I have been in touch with the Performing Arts Pavilion coordinator, who plans to begin scheduling sometime in the next month or so. I'll post the rehearsal schedule once he confirms it.

      Have a wonderful holiday season!

      Arianna of Wynthrope
      Director, Pennsic 38 Choir

    • Susan Stoltze
      Just a suggestion ...  Copernicus Last Words, performed by Broceliande.   - Susannah Greetings Known World Singers!   The KWC list has been pretty quiet
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 8, 2008
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        Just a suggestion ...  "Copernicus' Last Words, "performed by Broceliande.
         
        - Susannah
        Greetings Known World Singers!
         
        The KWC list has been pretty quiet for a while so I thought I would liven things up a bit. :-)
         
        After a bit of brainstorming, we have a theme for next Pennsic: Astronomy!
         
        2009 is the International Year of Astronomy, in celebration of the 400th anniversary of both Galileo's work with the telescope and of the publication of Kepler's Astronomia Nova.
         
        Since I haven't found any choral works about Galileo or Kepler themselves, we'll be singing pieces about stars, planets, the moon, the sun and anything else that might be bent to our theme. Though, I'm still mulling over whether "Tan Ta Ra Cried Mars" qualifies. :-) I have a fair number of pieces in the running so far, including Weelkes' "Thule, the Period of Cosmography" , Michael East's "Hence Stars" and "Parmi di Star" by Severin Cornet. Your suggestions on pieces that fit this theme are welcome! Once the final selections are made, I'll post them to the Yahoo Group as usual.
         
        Also, I have been in touch with the Performing Arts Pavilion coordinator, who plans to begin scheduling sometime in the next month or so. I'll post the rehearsal schedule once he confirms it.

        Have a wonderful holiday season!

        Arianna of Wynthrope
        Director, Pennsic 38 Choir


      • Karen Kasper
        Thanks for thinking about our theme, Susannah!   I assume you mean The Last Words of Copernicus? It s an interesting idea, but this song appears to be from
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 8, 2008
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          Thanks for thinking about our theme, Susannah!
           
          I assume you mean "The Last Words of Copernicus?" It's an interesting idea, but this song appears to be from the Sacred Harp shape note tradition, which is 18th - 19th century American in origin. The Known World Choir does medieval and renaissance music, so I'm afraid this piece won't fit in our time period. But I hope that won't stop you from singing with us, or from suggesting other pieces.
           
          Thanks!

          Arianna

        • Gregory Stuart Pettigrew
          I suppose that means Also sprach Zarathustra is out... ... -- - Gregory Stuart Pettigrew
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 8, 2008
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            I suppose that means Also sprach Zarathustra is out...

            On Mon, Dec 8, 2008 at 4:12 PM, Karen Kasper <arianna_wyn@...> wrote:
            Thanks for thinking about our theme, Susannah!
             
            I assume you mean "The Last Words of Copernicus?" It's an interesting idea, but this song appears to be from the Sacred Harp shape note tradition, which is 18th - 19th century American in origin. The Known World Choir does medieval and renaissance music, so I'm afraid this piece won't fit in our time period. But I hope that won't stop you from singing with us, or from suggesting other pieces.
             
            Thanks!

            Arianna




            --
            - Gregory Stuart Pettigrew
          • Karen Kasper
            ...   Afraid so. I know, I m such a killjoy...  :-) Arianna   P.S. Close the pod bay doors, Dave.  Daisy, Daisy.... (hee-hee) ... Afraid so. I know, I m
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 8, 2008
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              >I suppose that means Also sprach Zarathustra is out...
               
              Afraid so. I know, I'm such a killjoy...  :-)

              Arianna
               
              P.S. Close the pod bay doors, Dave.  Daisy, Daisy.... (hee-hee)

            • Jennifer Kobayashi
              Arianna - Astronomy is a great theme! Some additional possibilities: Orazio Vecchi: O sole, o stelle, o luna (6 parts: SSA T(or A) T(or A) B ) Orazio Vecchi:
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 9, 2008
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                Arianna -
                Astronomy is a great theme!

                Some additional possibilities:
                Orazio Vecchi: O sole, o stelle, o luna (6 parts: SSA T(or A) T(or A) B )
                Orazio Vecchi: Mentre mia stella (6 parts: SSA T(or A) T(or A) B )
                Stella Splendens from Llibre Vermell
                Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern (How Brightly Beams the Morning Star) composed by Philipp Nicolai, with a big fancy arrangement by Michael Praetorius,
                Caligo terrae scinditur/Virgo Maria, filia/Tenor an Anon. 14th cen. English Petronian motet (Oxford Anthology of Music: Medieval Music)
                Guillame Dufay: Cunditor alme siderum
                F. Pilkington: Thanks Gentle Moon
                (and from the Oxford Book of Italian Madrigals:)
                Monteverdi: Ecco mormorar l'onde (1590) SSATB (about the dawn...)
                Marenzio: Che fa oggi il mio sole (1580) SSATB (What doth today my sun..)

                That's what I've got at the moment. Sounds like fun; I hope I can be there!

                - Gwendolyn of Middlemarch aka Jennifer

                --- On Mon, 12/8/08, Karen Kasper <arianna_wyn@...> wrote:

                Greetings Known World Singers!

                After a bit of brainstorming, we have a theme for next Pennsic: Astronomy!
              • Karen Kasper
                Great suggestions!  Thank so much. And I d love to have as much of your family singing with us as are willing. :-) Arianna ... Astronomy is a great theme!
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 9, 2008
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                  Great suggestions!  Thank so much. And I'd love to have as much of your family singing with us as are willing. :-)

                  Arianna

                  --- On Tue, 12/9/08, Jennifer Kobayashi <jhkob@...> wrote:
                  Astronomy is a great theme!

                  Some additional possibilities:
                  .
                  _,___

                • Jennifer Kobayashi
                  Two more possibilities: Orienti Oriens: School of St Martial of Limoges, Paris, Bibliotheque Nationale, Ms Lat. 3719, Central Corpus Sol occasum nesciens (49
                  Message 8 of 8 , Dec 9, 2008
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                    Two more possibilities:

                    Orienti Oriens: School of St Martial of Limoges, Paris, Bibliotheque Nationale, Ms Lat. 3719, Central Corpus

                    Sol occasum nesciens (49 in Musica Britannica Medieval Carols)


                    -Jennifer
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