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Re: Joe Osborne

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  • allenblasco
    ... with ... Great medley of classic hits, Steve. Diverse as can be, and yet the bass sounds exactly the same on every one of them.....talk about a signature
    Message 1 of 29 , Feb 1, 2005
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      --- In KS_and_KC_GenOne_Rockers@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Pinkston"
      <fdmundo@y...> wrote:
      >
      > One of my early influences was Joe Osborn. He played melodically,
      with
      > lots of slides and upper-register stuff, and he played with a pick.
      > Here's a medley of just a *few* Joe Osborn licks:
      >
      > http://www.neonbridge.com/MP3%20Clips/joe_osborn_medley.mp3
      >
      > - Steve P.

      Great medley of classic hits, Steve. Diverse as can be, and yet the
      bass sounds exactly the same on every one of them.....talk about a
      signature sound! Joe, guitarist Tommy Tedesco, and drummer Hal
      Blaine were the most recorded rhythm section in Pop music history,
      together and individually.
      Allen Blasco
    • allenblasco
      ... melodically, ... pick. ... the ... OK, maybe The Funk Brothers (Motown) and the Muscle Shoals guys could claim the title too, but it s still a shitload of
      Message 2 of 29 , Feb 1, 2005
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        --- In KS_and_KC_GenOne_Rockers@yahoogroups.com, "allenblasco"
        <allenblasco@y...> wrote:
        >
        > --- In KS_and_KC_GenOne_Rockers@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Pinkston"
        > <fdmundo@y...> wrote:
        > >
        > > One of my early influences was Joe Osborn. He played
        melodically,
        > with
        > > lots of slides and upper-register stuff, and he played with a
        pick.
        > > Here's a medley of just a *few* Joe Osborn licks:
        > >
        > > http://www.neonbridge.com/MP3%20Clips/joe_osborn_medley.mp3
        > >
        > > - Steve P.
        >
        > Great medley of classic hits, Steve. Diverse as can be, and yet
        the
        > bass sounds exactly the same on every one of them.....talk about a
        > signature sound! Joe, guitarist Tommy Tedesco, and drummer Hal
        > Blaine were the most recorded rhythm section in Pop music history,
        > together and individually.
        > Allen Blasco

        OK, maybe The Funk Brothers (Motown) and the Muscle Shoals guys
        could claim the title too, but it's still a shitload of hits any way
        you slice it...
        AB
      • L. Dennis Higgins
        Steve - thanks for posting the Carl Kaye site. She was one of my earliest influences. Every now and then on a Saturday afternoon, I pull out the CDs I know she
        Message 3 of 29 , Feb 1, 2005
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          Steve - thanks for posting the Carl Kaye site. She was one of my
          earliest influences. Every now and then on a Saturday afternoon, I pull
          out the CDs I know she is on and just lay down and listen. I don't know
          who posted the medly - but thanks to you, too. What a cool collection.
          I'm now on a hunt for all that material. If I don't already own the
          CDs, I soon will.

          I used to own the two record set "How to Play..." but I loaned it to
          the manager of a club I was playing and he never returned it. Nice
          guy!!! I think I can get it again through the site you posted.

          In terms of using a pick with my bass, I only use a pick in the studio.
          The rest of the time its my own random finger pickin' style. Works for
          me. Also, I have switched from using my 1950's Fender Precision to an
          old Gibson Melody Maker bass I picked up a few years ago for the stuff
          I am doing now. Check out this site about the Gibson Melody Maker bass:

          http://www.guitarshop.net/mmbass.htm

          It's a great guitar and plays much like the ebo I used to own. But, I
          still get out the Fender from time to time and give it a hug. It's
          still my favorite.

          Dennis Fox Higgins
          bass, guitar, and yes - clarinet

          On Jan 31, 2005, at 9:47 PM, Steve Pinkston wrote:

          > Carol Kaye also managed to do fairly well playing bass with a pick:
        • Steve Pinkston
          ... Carol was a terrific player, too, although lately she seems to have gone around the bend and has started taking credit for some Jamerson tracks including
          Message 4 of 29 , Feb 1, 2005
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            --- In KS_and_KC_GenOne_Rockers@yahoogroups.com, L. Dennis Higgins
            <dhiggins@u...> wrote:
            > Steve - thanks for posting the Carol Kaye site. She was one of my
            > earliest influences.

            Carol was a terrific player, too, although lately she seems to have
            gone "around the bend" and has started taking credit for some Jamerson
            tracks including "Bernadette."

            Other pick-style bassists include Phil Lesh (who Zerf turned me onto
            in the 60s), Chris Squire (who was rumored to use a shilling coin as a
            pick), and Noel Redding.

            - Steve P.
          • danny fleming
            Hey Dennis, Speaking of bass guitars and especially Gibson. I read an article about Jack Bruce s famous Cream-days bass guitar...much like your Melody Maker
            Message 5 of 29 , Feb 1, 2005
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              Hey Dennis,
              Speaking of bass guitars and especially Gibson.
              I read an article about Jack Bruce's famous Cream-days bass
              guitar...much like your Melody Maker bass pictured here, that
              had somehow made it back into Jack's hands.  Seems he let
              it go, or it was stolen, don't remember the twist there, but
              at any rate he had lost track of it.  When it was returned to him,
              and this would have been about 2 or 3 years ago, he had to
              verify it was actually THE ONE, so he removed a plate...I think
              it might have been the plate that opens up to work on wiring, and
              in there he had placed a ball bearing...and sure enough it was
              still there.  He said the ball bearing, or whatever it was he had
              placed in the cavity gave him that buzzy distorted sound that
              he liked so well.  I had never heard of such a thing to alter the
              sound of a bass. 
              The other comment he made about the bass was that he had
              grown accustom to playing other bass guitars throughout the
              years, and now the old Gibson felt...small to him...like a toy.
              He said he just couldn't play on it because it felt so small.
              Wasn't Jack a player that used a pic???
               
              dano

              "L. Dennis Higgins" <dhiggins@...> wrote:
              Steve - thanks for posting the Carl Kaye site. She was one of my
              earliest influences. Every now and then on a Saturday afternoon, I pull
              out the CDs I know she is on and just lay down and listen. I don't know
              who posted the medly - but thanks to you, too. What a cool collection.
              I'm now on a hunt for all that material. If I don't already own the
              CDs, I soon will.

              I used to own the two record set "How to Play..." but I loaned it to
              the manager of a club I was playing and he never returned it. Nice
              guy!!! I think I can get it again through the site you posted.

              In terms of using a pick with my bass, I only use a pick in the studio.
              The rest of the time its my own random finger pickin' style. Works for
              me. Also, I have switched from using my 1950's Fender Precision to an
              old Gibson Melody Maker bass I picked up a few years ago for the stuff
              I am doing now. Check out this site about the Gibson Melody Maker bass:

              http://www.guitarshop.net/mmbass.htm

              It's a great guitar and plays much like the ebo I used to own. But, I
              still get out the Fender from time to time and give it a hug. It's
              still my favorite.

              Dennis Fox Higgins
              bass, guitar, and yes - clarinet

              On Jan 31, 2005, at 9:47 PM, Steve Pinkston wrote:

              > Carol Kaye also managed to do fairly well playing bass with a pick:


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            • Rodney Lay
              Dennis, I have around 20 basses. They all have certain features about them that I like. It depends a lot on the type of music I am playing that governs the
              Message 6 of 29 , Feb 1, 2005
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                Dennis,
                 
                I have around 20 basses.  They all have certain features about them that I like.  It depends a lot on the type of music I am playing that governs the bass and type of playing style I will use.  In the studio, I will usually bring a fretted 5 string and a fretless 4 string.  If the producer lets me know ahead of time, I will bring my old upright Kay bass, if the song calls for it.  I also have an upright electric Ampeg bass that is nice on some songs.  Another bass that is nice on sessions is a stereo Ovation bass that I will play with a pick.  By running that into 2 seperate channels, the engineer is able to put some real strange effects on one channel, leaving the other channel fairly normal, then doing some panning and playing with criss-crossing some sounds, producing something Phil Spector would be proud of.
                 
                At the HOF concert, I used a 1954 precision bass to emulate the sound of that era of music.  At my age, authenticity is something I adhere to, and since my fingers won't move as fast as they used to, I have to cling to something to give myself worth.  As far as having so many basses, I think it has something to do with some primal instinct that makes males desire to be more polygomous....with everything.
                 
                Rodney  

                "L. Dennis Higgins" <dhiggins@...> wrote:
                Steve - thanks for posting the Carl Kaye site. She was one of my
                earliest influences. Every now and then on a Saturday afternoon, I pull
                out the CDs I know she is on and just lay down and listen. I don't know
                who posted the medly - but thanks to you, too. What a cool collection.
                I'm now on a hunt for all that material. If I don't already own the
                CDs, I soon will.

                I used to own the two record set "How to Play..." but I loaned it to
                the manager of a club I was playing and he never returned it. Nice
                guy!!! I think I can get it again through the site you posted.

                In terms of using a pick with my bass, I only use a pick in the studio.
                The rest of the time its my own random finger pickin' style. Works for
                me. Also, I have switched from using my 1950's Fender Precision to an
                old Gibson Melody Maker bass I picked up a few years ago for the stuff
                I am doing now. Check out this site about the Gibson Melody Maker bass:

                http://www.guitarshop.net/mmbass.htm

                It's a great guitar and plays much like the ebo I used to own. But, I
                still get out the Fender from time to time and give it a hug. It's
                still my favorite.

                Dennis Fox Higgins
                bass, guitar, and yes - clarinet

                On Jan 31, 2005, at 9:47 PM, Steve Pinkston wrote:

                > Carol Kaye also managed to do fairly well playing bass with a pick:
              • Dawayne Bailey
                ... my ... Jamerson ... http://carolkaye.com
                Message 7 of 29 , Feb 1, 2005
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                  --- In KS_and_KC_GenOne_Rockers@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Pinkston"
                  <fdmundo@y...> wrote:
                  >
                  > --- In KS_and_KC_GenOne_Rockers@yahoogroups.com, L. Dennis Higgins
                  > <dhiggins@u...> wrote:
                  > > Steve - thanks for posting the Carol Kaye site. She was one of
                  my
                  > > earliest influences.
                  >
                  > Carol was a terrific player, too, although lately she seems to have
                  > gone "around the bend" and has started taking credit for some
                  Jamerson
                  > tracks including "Bernadette."
                  >


                  http://carolkaye.com
                • Steve Pinkston
                  ... I did a Google image search and all the pics I found appear to show JB playing finger or thumb style, although I do remember copping a false-harmonic lick
                  Message 8 of 29 , Feb 1, 2005
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                    --- In KS_and_KC_GenOne_Rockers@yahoogroups.com, danny fleming
                    <danodeluxe2000@y...> wrote:
                    > Wasn't Jack a player that used a pic???
                    >

                    I did a Google image search and all the pics I found appear to show
                    JB playing finger or thumb style, although I do remember copping a
                    false-harmonic lick from him that HAD to have been played with a
                    pick.

                    http://www.rockpalastarchiv.de/gifs/bruce.jpg
                    http://twtd.bluemountains.net.au/cream/img/jbcafe.jpg
                    http://www.alovesuprememusic.com/JackInCream.jpg

                    - Steve P.
                  • Steve Pinkston
                    ... Higgins ... have ... Non-bassists can skip to the next message, but for those of us who obsess about such things, here s the whole CK-JJ controversy laid
                    Message 9 of 29 , Feb 1, 2005
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                      --- In KS_and_KC_GenOne_Rockers@yahoogroups.com, "Dawayne Bailey"
                      <oozlet@y...> wrote:
                      >
                      > --- In KS_and_KC_GenOne_Rockers@yahoogroups.com, "Steve Pinkston"
                      > <fdmundo@y...> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > --- In KS_and_KC_GenOne_Rockers@yahoogroups.com, L. Dennis
                      Higgins
                      > > <dhiggins@u...> wrote:
                      > > > Steve - thanks for posting the Carol Kaye site. She was one of
                      > my
                      > > > earliest influences.
                      > >
                      > > Carol was a terrific player, too, although lately she seems to
                      have
                      > > gone "around the bend" and has started taking credit for some
                      > Jamerson
                      > > tracks including "Bernadette."
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                      > http://carolkaye.com

                      Non-bassists can skip to the next message, but for those of us who
                      obsess about such things, here's the whole CK-JJ controversy laid
                      out nicely:

                      http://www.bassland.net/books-n-mags.htm

                      I give total props to Carol for the work that she did in LA. Carol,
                      Joe Osborn, and Lee Sklar were the main studio competition when I
                      moved to LA in '72. BUT, Jamerson definitely played bass
                      on "Bernadette" and many of the other Motown hits she now claims. I
                      don't need an affadavit to know this -- all I need is my ears.

                      - Steve P.
                    • L. Dennis Higgins
                      One of those pics looks like he is playing a Dan Electro? Any truth to this? dfh
                      Message 10 of 29 , Feb 1, 2005
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                        One of those pics looks like he is playing a Dan Electro? Any truth to
                        this?

                        dfh

                        On Feb 1, 2005, at 4:44 PM, Steve Pinkston wrote:

                        > the pics I found appear to show
                        > JB playing
                      • Steve Pinkston
                        ... truth to ... Yup -- a Dano Longhorn. I used to have a matching set of a Longhorn bass & guitar. I don t know what happened to them; I sort of remember that
                        Message 11 of 29 , Feb 1, 2005
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                          --- In KS_and_KC_GenOne_Rockers@yahoogroups.com, L. Dennis Higgins
                          <dhiggins@u...> wrote:
                          > One of those pics looks like he is playing a Dan Electro? Any
                          truth to
                          > this?
                          >
                          > dfh

                          Yup -- a Dano Longhorn. I used to have a matching set of a Longhorn
                          bass & guitar. I don't know what happened to them; I sort of
                          remember that a musician I knew borrowed them and didn't return them
                          in the early 70s.

                          The Dano Longhorn was super-cool for a number of reasons, but mostly
                          I liked the bright sound, short scale, and the fact that it had 24
                          frets with easy access all the way to the top fret.

                          - Steve P.
                        • L. Dennis Higgins
                          I had a Dano Longhorn, also. I think I traded it in Hays, Kansas for an ebo somewhere around 1966 - Dee Hoyt got that one. By coincidence, I am using Dan
                          Message 12 of 29 , Feb 1, 2005
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                            I had a Dano Longhorn, also. I think I traded it in Hays, Kansas for an
                            ebo somewhere around 1966 - Dee Hoyt got that one. By coincidence, I am
                            using Dan Electro batteries in my guitar tuners. There is a store here
                            in ABQ that sells them - don't know if it is the same company but the
                            name is spelled the same.

                            I'd trade the batteries straight across.....if only.

                            Dennis Fox Higgins

                            On Feb 1, 2005, at 6:49 PM, Steve Pinkston wrote:

                            > Yup -- a Dano Longhorn.
                          • L. Dennis Higgins
                            I ve got a question for the group - group help please. I belong to and play with the New Mexico Folk Society here in Albuquerque. We meet every Sunday and
                            Message 13 of 29 , Feb 1, 2005
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                              I've got a question for the group - group help please. I belong to and
                              play with the New Mexico Folk Society here in Albuquerque. We meet
                              every Sunday and perform around the city for a variety of functions -
                              it's great fun. I play guitar and sing with the group but am thinking
                              of changing to bass. Since the requirement is that we stay all
                              acoustic, I'm probably going to purchase an acoustic bass. Don't want
                              to go with the upright so, I'm thinking of the Martin b1 (no
                              electronics). Anyone have an opinion on that instrument? (I know, silly
                              question!) Anyone have a better idea? (I know, sillier question!)

                              Dennis Fox Higgins
                              Rock and Roll the Folk music.

                              On Feb 1, 2005, at 6:00 AM, L. Dennis Higgins wrote:

                              > with my bass
                            • Steve Pinkston
                              ... It seems to me that most acoustic bass guitars just don t have enough power in the low register to be heard when there is more than about one other
                              Message 14 of 29 , Feb 2, 2005
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                                --- In KS_and_KC_GenOne_Rockers@yahoogroups.com, L. Dennis Higgins
                                <dhiggins@u...> wrote:
                                > I've got a question for the group - group help please. I belong to and
                                > play with the New Mexico Folk Society here in Albuquerque. We meet
                                > every Sunday and perform around the city for a variety of functions -
                                > it's great fun. I play guitar and sing with the group but am thinking
                                > of changing to bass. Since the requirement is that we stay all
                                > acoustic, I'm probably going to purchase an acoustic bass. Don't want
                                > to go with the upright so, I'm thinking of the Martin b1 (no
                                > electronics). Anyone have an opinion on that instrument? (I know, silly
                                > question!) Anyone have a better idea? (I know, sillier question!)
                                >
                                > Dennis Fox Higgins
                                > Rock and Roll the Folk music.
                                >

                                It seems to me that most acoustic bass guitars just don't have enough
                                power in the low register to be heard when there is more than about
                                one other acoustic instrument. The same is true of that bass guitar
                                precursor, the mandobass. The Mexican guitarron comes through a group
                                stronger, but it uses heavy gut strings, pulled WAY high off the
                                fingerboard, and the player usually plays octaves for extra power. It
                                really requires the muscles of a longshoreman to play. In Mexico, many
                                mariachis and street bands use upright rather than guitarron.

                                Consider the upright again, or consider getting a special dispensation
                                to use a little battery-powered amp for your new Martin acoustic bass
                                guitar.

                                - Steve P.
                              • B. Scott Nelson
                                Dennis, I agree with Steve Pinkston. Get the little amp and go with the acoustic/electric. I have an Epiphone El Matador. It buzzes a little ... which I
                                Message 15 of 29 , Feb 3, 2005
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                                  Dennis,
                                  I agree with Steve Pinkston. Get the little amp and go with the
                                  acoustic/electric.

                                  I have an Epiphone El Matador. It buzzes a little ... which I
                                  blame on "player incompetence". But, it would be a much cheaper
                                  alternative to the Martin. ANY Martin.

                                  Unless you chop bricks with your hands on a regular basis, the
                                  guitaron is a chore and doesn't easily allow for more intricate
                                  lines. It pretty much just thumps along ... one note at at time.

                                  However ... you should really re-consider the stand-up. It has the
                                  pure bass tones and authentic acoustical sound that doesn't fight
                                  the folk sound at any volume.

                                  I used to live and play in Santa Fe ... still go there regularly ...
                                  and every folk/bluegrass band around used a stand-up. Have you
                                  been there long enough to have heard of The Family Lotus? They had
                                  a bass/cello player. Awesome. Their drummer was none other than
                                  Neil Stone, an ex-Flipper I am told (by him). His name is Aaron
                                  Stone now and he still lives in Albuquerque. Fred Hartman, the
                                  original drummer with the original Rainmakers, also lives there.

                                  In summary, I'd ...:

                                  1. Go with the stand-up.
                                  2. Try a cheap acoustic/electric to see if you like it ... and
                                  then go with the stand-up.
                                  3. Start chopping bricks with your hands.
                                  4. Stick with the guitar and find another bass player.

                                  But, hey ... that's just my opinion as an ex-drummer (Rainmakers,
                                  Ann Brewer & The Flames), ex-bass player (Scottie & The Tissues ...
                                  yes, that's a real name), ex-keyboard guy (Danny Cox), and current
                                  harmonica player (everybody who will let me sit-in). As you can
                                  see, downsizing has been very good to me.

                                  B. Scott Nelson

                                  PS: I'll be in Santa Fe in September for Fiesta. Any chance you'll
                                  be playing around the area then? Do you allow sit-ins?




                                  --- In KS_and_KC_GenOne_Rockers@yahoogroups.com, L. Dennis Higgins
                                  <dhiggins@u...> wrote:
                                  > I've got a question for the group - group help please. I belong to
                                  and
                                  > play with the New Mexico Folk Society here in Albuquerque. We meet
                                  > every Sunday and perform around the city for a variety of
                                  functions -
                                  > it's great fun. I play guitar and sing with the group but am
                                  thinking
                                  > of changing to bass. Since the requirement is that we stay all
                                  > acoustic, I'm probably going to purchase an acoustic bass. Don't
                                  want
                                  > to go with the upright so, I'm thinking of the Martin b1 (no
                                  > electronics). Anyone have an opinion on that instrument? (I know,
                                  silly
                                  > question!) Anyone have a better idea? (I know, sillier question!)
                                  >
                                  > Dennis Fox Higgins
                                  > Rock and Roll the Folk music.
                                  >
                                  > On Feb 1, 2005, at 6:00 AM, L. Dennis Higgins wrote:
                                  >
                                  > > with my bass
                                • L. Dennis Higgins
                                  Scott, Thanks for your excellent advice. Advice number four sounds better than advice number three but advice number three is more tempting. Bass is still my
                                  Message 16 of 29 , Feb 3, 2005
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                                    Scott,
                                    Thanks for your excellent advice. Advice number four sounds better than
                                    advice number three but advice number three is more tempting. Bass is
                                    still my main love - but I might go with advice number four. However,
                                    my wife would rather I go with advice number two if not advice number
                                    four. We do have a couple of mortgages to pay. Advice number one is out
                                    - no offense. And, you need to know I usually listen to drummers. Ask
                                    Mike Schmidt or Mike Morrand or Bill Glenn. I always listened to their
                                    advice - usually "stop rushing."

                                    Would love to see you in New Mexico in September. Are you coming for
                                    Zozobra? What a trip. If I'm playing and the powers that be say "YES"
                                    by all means, let's jam. Either way, let me know if your coming and
                                    we'll get together. Don't know of the Family Lotus. The Folk/bluegrass
                                    scene here is bigger than expected.

                                    Dennis Fox Higgins
                                    New Mexico transplant - Kansas original (almost) - Nebraska born

                                    On Feb 3, 2005, at 1:45 PM, B. Scott Nelson wrote:

                                    > 3.   Start chopping bricks with your hands.
                                    >     4.   Stick with the guitar and find another bass player.
                                    >
                                  • Rodney Lay
                                    Dennis, The uprights are not so hard to play if you have them set up like a jazz player likes them (very close, but no buzz). They are a lot of fun. Rodney
                                    Message 17 of 29 , Feb 4, 2005
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                                      Dennis, The uprights are not so hard to play if you have them set up like a jazz player likes them (very close, but no buzz).  They are a lot of fun.  Rodney

                                      "B. Scott Nelson" <Nelson@...> wrote:

                                      Dennis,
                                      I agree with Steve Pinkston.   Get the little amp and go with the
                                      acoustic/electric.  

                                      I have an Epiphone El Matador.   It buzzes a little ... which I
                                      blame on "player incompetence".   But, it would be a much cheaper
                                      alternative to the Martin.   ANY Martin.

                                      Unless you chop bricks with your hands on a regular basis, the
                                      guitaron is a chore and doesn't easily allow for more intricate
                                      lines.  It pretty much just thumps along ... one note at at time.

                                      However ... you should really re-consider the stand-up.   It has the
                                      pure bass tones and authentic acoustical sound that doesn't fight
                                      the folk sound at any volume.  

                                      I used to live and play in Santa Fe ... still go there regularly ...
                                      and every folk/bluegrass band around used a stand-up.     Have you
                                      been there long enough to have heard of The Family Lotus?   They had
                                      a bass/cello player.  Awesome.    Their drummer was none other than
                                      Neil Stone, an ex-Flipper I am told (by him).  His name is Aaron
                                      Stone now and he still lives in Albuquerque.   Fred Hartman, the
                                      original drummer with the original Rainmakers, also lives there.

                                      In summary, I'd ...:

                                          1.   Go with the stand-up.
                                          2.   Try a cheap acoustic/electric to see if you like it ... and
                                      then go with the stand-up.
                                          3.   Start chopping bricks with your hands.
                                          4.   Stick with the guitar and find another bass player.

                                      But, hey ... that's just my opinion as an ex-drummer (Rainmakers,
                                      Ann Brewer & The Flames), ex-bass player (Scottie & The Tissues ...
                                      yes, that's a real name), ex-keyboard guy (Danny Cox), and current
                                      harmonica player (everybody who will let me sit-in).   As you can
                                      see, downsizing has been very good to me.

                                      B. Scott Nelson

                                      PS:  I'll be in Santa Fe in September for Fiesta.  Any chance you'll
                                      be playing around the area then?   Do you allow sit-ins?




                                      --- In KS_and_KC_GenOne_Rockers@yahoogroups.com, L. Dennis Higgins
                                      <dhiggins@u...> wrote:
                                      > I've got a question for the group - group help please. I belong to
                                      and
                                      > play with the New Mexico Folk Society here in Albuquerque. We meet
                                      > every Sunday and perform around the city for a variety of
                                      functions -
                                      > it's great fun. I play guitar and sing with the group but am
                                      thinking
                                      > of changing to bass. Since the requirement is that we stay all
                                      > acoustic, I'm probably going to purchase an acoustic bass. Don't
                                      want
                                      > to go with the upright so, I'm thinking of the Martin b1 (no
                                      > electronics). Anyone have an opinion on that instrument? (I know,
                                      silly
                                      > question!) Anyone have a better idea? (I know, sillier question!)
                                      >
                                      > Dennis Fox Higgins
                                      > Rock and Roll the Folk music.
                                      >
                                      > On Feb 1, 2005, at 6:00 AM, L. Dennis Higgins wrote:
                                      >
                                      > > with my bass



                                    • Steve Pinkston
                                      ... like a jazz player likes them (very close, but no buzz). They are a lot of fun. Rodney ... Of course, if set the strings too low, your sound won t be
                                      Message 18 of 29 , Feb 4, 2005
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                                        --- In KS_and_KC_GenOne_Rockers@yahoogroups.com, Rodney Lay
                                        <taptap123kick@y...> wrote:
                                        > Dennis, The uprights are not so hard to play if you have them set up
                                        like a jazz player likes them (very close, but no buzz). They are a
                                        lot of fun. Rodney
                                        >

                                        Of course, if set the strings too low, your sound won't be strong
                                        enough to carry. It's a question of physics, really. With the action
                                        set high, you can play really hard and get more volume, but it takes
                                        more hand strength and armadillo-like calluses to do it. Back before
                                        amplification, when upright basses were strung with gut strings, the
                                        guy that got the job was the one that could put out a big sound
                                        acoustically, and these guys really had gorilla mitts. There's a
                                        famous story about Charles Mingus that he was upset that a club owner
                                        had not tuned the piano before a gig. In anger, Mingus reached inside
                                        the piano, grabbed a handful of bass strings, and yanked them out.

                                        - Steve P.
                                      • Rodney Lay
                                        When I got my old circa 1950 Kay upright, it had gut strings on it that were really set high off the neck. I took it to a guy that put flat wound steel
                                        Message 19 of 29 , Feb 4, 2005
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                                          When I got my old circa 1950 Kay upright, it had gut strings on it that were really set high off the neck.  I took it to a guy that put flat wound steel strings on it, lowered the bridge so the strings set close to the fingerboard and installed a pickup in it.  It plays easy, and on rock and roll it booms like a cannon through the sound system or an amp.  It is so cool to play "slap" style on it.  On big band stuff, I play it easier, with a much lighter touch.   Folk music fits it well too.  However, as you know, it's much different to play than an electric bass guitar.  Totally different finger positioning. for me the good keys to play in are Bb, F and A.  Rodney

                                          Steve Pinkston <fdmundo@...> wrote:

                                          --- In KS_and_KC_GenOne_Rockers@yahoogroups.com, Rodney Lay
                                          <taptap123kick@y...> wrote:
                                          > Dennis, The uprights are not so hard to play if you have them set up
                                          like a jazz player likes them (very close, but no buzz).  They are a
                                          lot of fun.  Rodney
                                          >

                                          Of course, if set the strings too low, your sound won't be strong
                                          enough to carry. It's a question of physics, really. With the action
                                          set high, you can play really hard and get more volume, but it takes
                                          more hand strength and armadillo-like calluses to do it. Back before
                                          amplification, when upright basses were strung with gut strings, the
                                          guy that got the job was the one that could put out a big sound
                                          acoustically, and these guys really had gorilla mitts. There's a
                                          famous story about Charles Mingus that he was upset that a club owner
                                          had not tuned the piano before a gig. In anger, Mingus reached inside
                                          the piano, grabbed a handful of bass strings, and yanked them out.

                                          - Steve P.



                                        • Steve Pinkston
                                          I really have trouble playing what I want to play on an upright that has really high action. In fact the ..mmwwWAHhh.. sound of a low-action upright has
                                          Message 20 of 29 , Feb 4, 2005
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                                            I really have trouble playing what I want to play on an upright that
                                            has really high action. In fact the "..mmwwWAHhh.." sound of a
                                            low-action upright has become the standard, I think. These days, I
                                            think it is just expected that -- at least in jazz settings -- the
                                            upright player will use a pickup. In folk, bluegrass, etc. the
                                            amplification is not always used, and there you need to get a big
                                            sound acoustically.

                                            And EVERY acoustic player I meet these days is using one of those cute
                                            little Acoustic Image amps:

                                            http://www.acousticimg.com/

                                            They're big bucks, but they have a sweet sound.

                                            - steve


                                            --- In KS_and_KC_GenOne_Rockers@yahoogroups.com, Rodney Lay
                                            <taptap123kick@y...> wrote:
                                            > When I got my old circa 1950 Kay upright, it had gut strings on it
                                            that were really set high off the neck. I took it to a guy that put
                                            flat wound steel strings on it, lowered the bridge so the strings set
                                            close to the fingerboard and installed a pickup in it. It plays easy,
                                            and on rock and roll it booms like a cannon through the sound system
                                            or an amp. It is so cool to play "slap" style on it. On big band
                                            stuff, I play it easier, with a much lighter touch. Folk music fits
                                            it well too. However, as you know, it's much different to play than
                                            an electric bass guitar. Totally different finger positioning. for me
                                            the good keys to play in are Bb, F and A. Rodney
                                          • Rodney Lay
                                            I use a Peavy keyboard amp with one 10 speaker. The cabinet is extra deep, giving it a nice sound for the bass. I connect the line out into the PA and it
                                            Message 21 of 29 , Feb 4, 2005
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                                              I use a Peavy keyboard amp with one 10" speaker.  The cabinet is extra deep, giving it a nice sound for the bass.  I connect the line out into the PA and it jars the building.  Sometimes it causes girls to pee, giving the band an extra treat.

                                              Steve Pinkston <fdmundo@...> wrote:

                                              I really have trouble playing what I want to play on an upright that
                                              has really high action. In fact the "..mmwwWAHhh.." sound of a
                                              low-action upright has become the standard, I think. These days, I
                                              think it is just expected that -- at least in jazz settings -- the
                                              upright player will use a pickup. In folk, bluegrass, etc. the
                                              amplification is not always used, and there you need to get a big
                                              sound acoustically.

                                              And EVERY acoustic player I meet these days is using one of those cute
                                              little Acoustic Image amps:

                                              http://www.acousticimg.com/

                                              They're big bucks, but they have a sweet sound.

                                              - steve


                                              --- In KS_and_KC_GenOne_Rockers@yahoogroups.com, Rodney Lay
                                              <taptap123kick@y...> wrote:
                                              > When I got my old circa 1950 Kay upright, it had gut strings on it
                                              that were really set high off the neck.  I took it to a guy that put
                                              flat wound steel strings on it, lowered the bridge so the strings set
                                              close to the fingerboard and installed a pickup in it.  It plays easy,
                                              and on rock and roll it booms like a cannon through the sound system
                                              or an amp.  It is so cool to play "slap" style on it.  On big band
                                              stuff, I play it easier, with a much lighter touch.   Folk music fits
                                              it well too.  However, as you know, it's much different to play than
                                              an electric bass guitar.  Totally different finger positioning. for me
                                              the good keys to play in are Bb, F and A.  Rodney 





                                            • Steve Pinkston
                                              ... extra deep, giving it a nice sound for the bass. I m amazed at how good the little amps have gotten lately. I have 3 amps -- a 2x15 Traynor rig from the
                                              Message 22 of 29 , Feb 4, 2005
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                                                --- In KS_and_KC_GenOne_Rockers@yahoogroups.com, Rodney Lay
                                                <taptap123kick@y...> wrote:
                                                > I use a Peavy keyboard amp with one 10" speaker. The cabinet is
                                                extra deep, giving it a nice sound for the bass.

                                                I'm amazed at how good the little amps have gotten lately. I have 3
                                                amps -- a 2x15 Traynor rig from the early 70s, a 1x15 SWR combo, and a
                                                Roland 1x10 cube amp. I end up using the Roland at most big-band
                                                rehearsals and gigs, and I'm never hurting for low end or punch.

                                                > I connect the line out into the PA and it jars the building.
                                                Sometimes it causes girls to pee, giving the band an extra treat.

                                                Hey, women have been pissed at me for years...

                                                - Steve P.
                                              • Rodney Lay
                                                The first wise ass hasn t got a chance in this chat room. It s tough to banter with a room full of musicians. ... extra deep, giving it a nice sound for the
                                                Message 23 of 29 , Feb 4, 2005
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                                                  The first wise ass hasn't got a chance in this chat room.  It's tough to banter with a room full of musicians.

                                                  Steve Pinkston <fdmundo@...> wrote:

                                                  --- In KS_and_KC_GenOne_Rockers@yahoogroups.com, Rodney Lay
                                                  <taptap123kick@y...> wrote:
                                                  > I use a Peavy keyboard amp with one 10" speaker.  The cabinet is
                                                  extra deep, giving it a nice sound for the bass.

                                                  I'm amazed at how good the little amps have gotten lately. I have 3
                                                  amps -- a 2x15 Traynor rig from the early 70s, a 1x15 SWR combo, and a
                                                  Roland 1x10 cube amp. I end up using the Roland at most big-band
                                                  rehearsals and gigs, and I'm never hurting for low end or punch.

                                                  > I connect the line out into the PA and it jars the building.
                                                  Sometimes it causes girls to pee, giving the band an extra treat.

                                                  Hey, women have been pissed at me for years...

                                                  - Steve P.




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