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Re: Dink's Answer

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  • alixnc
    Paul ... allow me to get muyself into even more trouble LOLOL ... We are really talking about a genre here, one Barnes and Noble likes to list as social
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 6 2:14 PM
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      Paul ... allow me to get muyself into even more trouble LOLOL ...

      We are really talking about a genre here, one Barnes and Noble likes to list as "social science fiction," that also includes Huxley amd Orwell.

      --- In Julian-May-discuss@yahoogroups.com, Paul Herring <pauljherring@...> wrote:
      <snip snip>
      > I don't see any reasonable comparison between JM and SK here.
      > Especially if you're comparing stories that either span fiction
      > timelines or fact timelines.

      I mean, more specifically, apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic (e.g. "The Terminator") works with cosmic/galactic, global and occasionally even parochial settings, the main point being psychosocial evolution (or fracture, as in Dark Tower) and sociomythology.
      Both JM's saga and the Tower deal with cataclysmic terrors, and both leave us with hope for a future, but in all JM's is a fairly optimistic vision, with Jung and Teilhard to light the way, and SK's is a very dark one. Also significant in this light, at least to me, are Salman Rushdie's 'The Satanic Verses'... Thomas Pynchon's 'Against the Day' ... and Margaret Atwood's 'Oryx and Crake,' which last makes both Huxley and Orwell look like Little Mary Sunshine.
      No loose ends in the Tower? However did "Sunoco" become a nonsense word? We know what happened between 450 AD and the publication of the Morte Darthur, but what the hell happened between Malory and Athur Eld? Show me the location of the Barony of Gilead on a current map of the US. And I'd like to hear the rest of Ted's story. And then there's that can of Nozz-A-La we're stuck with to spoil our puckishly gratuitous nearly-happy ending.
      Somewhere in all this, genre snobbery has begun to disappear, bless them all, and post-postmodernism and magic realism (ala Rushdie and Pynchon) are no more valid or virtuous than what we used to call horror and space opera and gothic fantasy. We finally realized our great Schlockmeister is a towering genius, and quit demanding glorified chick lit from women fiction writers -- or accusing them of it.
      Here foldeth the soap box for the day ...
      alix
    • Michelle Rose
      ... Nicely reasoned, alix. Given also that the Room Without Doors was in part a gravitic insulator, we might assume that the converse obtains: a gravitic
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 6 4:23 PM
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        --- In Julian-May-discuss@yahoogroups.com, "alixnc" <alixnc@...> wrote:
        >
        > Dink ...
        >
        >---snip---
        >
        > Here's one little puzzle for you. JM states directly that the Great Carbuncle is similar [she doesn't say identical] to the red stone with a glowing artifact that confines the living remains of Felice and Culluket. Other than the obvious physical similarities, what is it about the two artifacts that is so much alike? The answer lies in the function Culluket served in the Pliocene confrontation with Felice, and the function of the Great Carbuncle artifact deployed by Jack and Diamond, and Rogi's own uses of the keychain fob. They are all focusing agents. Dont take my word for it. Go look.
        >
        >---snip---
        > alix
        >

        Nicely reasoned, alix. Given also that the 'Room Without Doors' was in part a gravitic insulator, we might assume that the converse obtains: a gravitic focus or lens which may have been one purpose of the Carbuncle and certainly a primary purpose of the jumbo economy size model deployed by the Scurra during the climax of the Metapsychic Rebellion.

        Clever, these Lylmik...or rather: Marc...

        Michelle
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