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Re: [Julian-May-discuss] Re: Felice and the Many-in-All

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  • Oliver Mundy
    “I . . . don t see recall a reason why the many in all can t be the rebel kids, and it could be the Firvulag too, who also possessed limited skill in
    Message 1 of 11 , Sep 16, 2008
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      “I . . . don't see recall a reason why the many in all can't be the rebel
      kids, and it could be the Firvulag too, who also possessed limited skill in
      meta-concerts, even if they were reluctant to use them before Sharn and Ayfa
      took over. And there is NO doubt that it is Marc who helped Felice with the
      final blast of Gibraltar.” (Padraig)

      Padraig: The suggestion of the Firvulag is one I had not thought of:
      intriguing, certainly, especially in the light of the fact that they are
      known to have helped Felice before during her escape from the Tanu
      slave-caravan - but why would the Firvulag be described as 'so much farther
      out'? And would they have been capable of the necessary combination of
      minds at this period, before Sharn and Ayfa's reforms?

      I do think, too, that there is a clear
      distinction in the text between the many-in-All and the Ocalans. Of course
      you are
      right to say that Marc and his confederates, including the younger
      generation (Cloud acknowledges this in her conversations with Kuhal, as you
      have pointed out), were involved in the Gibraltar operation. That in fact
      is the whole point, because the many-in-All was *not* so involved; it had
      helped Felice on the Rhône, but this time it withheld its support and
      'tr[ied] to show [Felice] other ways', and it was
      only after this rejection that she found aid elsewhere - clearly from the
      Rebels.

      I feel more and more that the many-in-All may be identifiable with
      the Ships. They seem to be the most advanced race in the Pliocene
      universe; they have great metapsychic powers and are 'wholly benevolent'
      (JM in 'The Pliocene Companion') and capable of selfless love; they may not
      have achieved Unity as such (perhaps because they are not numerous enough,
      although this is only a guess), but their welcoming appearance at the very
      close of 'The Adversary', in response to Marc and Elizabeth's call, suggests
      that they are at least aware of the concept.

      Oliver Mundy.
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