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Re: Slonshal/slitsal

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  • mightyogbo
    ... depending on whether you are Irish or Scottish ... I agree with MikeJ on this one. Certainly there has been many a time that I ve raised a pint with Irish
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 17, 2006
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      --- In Julian-May-discuss@yahoogroups.com, <mikejmcloughlin@...> wrote:
      >
      > I believe it is connected to the Gaelic "Slainte" - pronounced "Slonch" or "Slanch"
      depending on whether you are Irish or Scottish
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Michael
      > To: Julian-May-discuss@yahoogroups.com
      > Does anyone know the linguistic roots of the words "slitsal"
      > and "slonshal"? I can deduce from the context of the word that it is a
      > salutation, but I'm curious about its origins.

      I agree with MikeJ on this one. Certainly there has been many a time that I've raised a pint
      with Irish friends to the toast of Slainte - which when pronounced with an Irish accent is
      very very close to "Slonshal". As far as I recall it means "to your health".

      As to Slitsal - perhaps this is JM's own variant for the Firvulag - much as the goddess Tana
      (Dana in the original Irish invasion sagas) become Te or Teah for the Firvulag and Howlers
      respectively.

      Anyway ... about to be whisked away to a swelterring non-internet holiday land for a few
      weeks. A big Slonshal to all for the coming holidays. Hmm, is Xmas shopping our own
      version of the Grand Combat?

      Te on Toast! ;-)

      -- Stephen
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