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Re: De-lurking and tears to the eye

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  • Paul Fitzpatrick
    Matt, Welcome to the group.You re right about that passage,it is quite moving,along with a lot of others in the series.Probably the most moving of all is the
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 25, 2005
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      Matt,
      Welcome to the group.You're right about that passage,it is quite
      moving,along with a lot of others in the series.Probably the most
      moving of all is the conversation between Rogi and Denis on the
      mountain before Rogi kills Fury.
      --- In Julian-May-discuss@yahoogroups.com, "Matt" <matt.hogg@v...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Hi All
      >
      > Let me first say hello, HELLO! I've been lurking on the group for a
      > while reading the posts etc but having now come to almost the end
      of
      > a second reread of the Milieu series I just had to post……… but an
      > introduction just to begin.
      >
      > My name is Matt, 37 years young, married with four rug rats aged
      > from 1 to 16. I live on the south coast of good old Blighty, with
      > two cats (one a Maine Coon!), a Miniature Dachshund (smaller then
      > both cats) and various fish.
      >
      > My favourite authors in descending order….. David Gemmell, Julian
      > May, Roger Zelazny and Joanne Harris.
      >
      > The main reason I just HAD to post, Jack the Bodiless page 308 -
      >
      > "How very lovely you look tonight, ma petite. No – you are more
      > than that, dear Addie. You are beautiful! Shall we dance? I would
      > like this to be a night you will remember all your life"
      >
      > This passage where Atoning Unifex buts-in on Marc's dance with
      > Adrienne gets me every time; Unifex knowing and us knowing (if you
      > are rereading) what is going to happen not long after. Laying in
      bed
      > reading this, especially if it is a cold rainy night, always brings
      > a tear to the eye and a lump to the throat.
      >
      > And something else I've only just cottoned onto is the fact
      > Unifex/Marc's unknown knowledge about what REALLY happens after the
      > rebellion. Marc escapes through the gate so he doesn't know the
      real
      > aftermath of his actions. This only really hit me when reading the
      > passage in Magnificat when Unifex encourages the Lylmik Supervisors
      > to keep their human bodies (and dogs) until the next Concilium
      > Session (page 195), hinting they may have to become corporal again
      > to procreate and prolong the Lylmik race!
      >
      > Hmmmm I'll go back to my wine now and finish Magnificat.
      >
      > Cheers all
      >
      > Matt
      >
      > PS those pictures of the White Mountain Resort Hotel REALLY brought
      > the books to life for me! And Hawaii etc…. oh well back to my
      > lurking……..
      >
    • Matt
      Thanks for the welcome.... Yes the series seems to get more emotional with each reread, I m obviously getting softer in my old age; but I m not quite at the
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 25, 2005
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        Thanks for the welcome....

        Yes the series seems to get more emotional with each reread, I'm
        obviously getting softer in my old age; but I'm not quite at the end
        yet so I'll get the tissues ready for the Denis and Rogi talk!

        As a minor point (and as I said above I haven't quite got to the end
        so I may be slight off track here) the sudden knock on the door and
        there stands Elaine bit always seems to me as a bit of a "Pretty
        Woman" style fluffy ending. We nearly all love Uncle Rogi's slightly
        maverick, loner come bumbling hero character and felt sorry for him
        when Don does the dirty on him with Elaine but the "live happily
        style" ending ... I want to feel happy for Rogi but not that happy.
        Anyway I'll go finish the book and see if I change my mind this time
        round.

        Cheers

        Matt

        --- In Julian-May-discuss@yahoogroups.com, "Paul Fitzpatrick"
        <alexmannion@y...> wrote:
        >
        > Matt,
        > Welcome to the group.You're right about that passage,it is quite
        > moving,along with a lot of others in the series.Probably the most
        > moving of all is the conversation between Rogi and Denis on the
        > mountain before Rogi kills Fury.
        > --- In Julian-May-discuss@yahoogroups.com, "Matt" <matt.hogg@v...>
        > wrote:
        > >
      • OLIVER MUNDY
        Greetings, Matt! I too am a recent arrival, some distance west of you and well ahead in the cat count (sixteen, although I cannot boast of any Marcels).
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 25, 2005
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                  Greetings, Matt!  I too am a recent arrival, some distance west of you and well ahead in the cat count (sixteen, although I cannot boast of any Marcels).
           
                  Marc-cum-Unifex's dual presence in time (and sometimes even in space) is a source of endless fascination.   How is it possible for the one persona to confront and coerce the other, as happens in 'Jack the Bodiless'?  Is Unifex following young Marc or leading him?  I feel it is a sign of JM's quality that she is not afraid to raise such questions and leave us to work out our own answers, instead of trying to pre-ordain all our responses as so many popular writers do.
           
                  For me the most moving passage in either the Exiles or the Milieu series is Teresa's conversation about God with her unborn baby - I say this without any doctrinal prejudice, since my background is Jewish and my belief as formless as a Tanu's - and her magical Christmas present to Rogi which immediately follows.  I am almost afraid to become acquainted with the Rimsky-Korsakoff opera, which I have never heard;  if I came to this passage with the additional stimulus of having the appropriate music in my head, I would probably keel over and die of emotion like a Gi!
           
                  Oliver Mundy.
        • Matt
          Hi Oliver The whole section in the cabin is an emotional rollercoaster..... JM certainly knows how to kick the emotions around the room, but then that is the
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 25, 2005
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            Hi Oliver

            The whole section in the cabin is an emotional rollercoaster.....

            JM certainly knows how to kick the emotions around the room, but
            then that is the sign of a good writer. All my favoured authors have
            the ability to make me laugh out loud and then bring a tear to my
            eye the next minute.

            As to Marc-Unifex - having read the posts for sometime now (been
            lurking for ages, possibly even a year or more!)I have realised how
            much more complex the whole series of books are, from being just a
            good read they have come so much more alive..... So thank you all
            for making my enjoyment of this excellent series even more complete.

            Cheers

            Matt

            --- In Julian-May-discuss@yahoogroups.com, "OLIVER MUNDY"
            <oliver.mundy@t...> wrote:
            >
            > Greetings, Matt! I too am a recent arrival, some distance
            west of you and well ahead in the cat count (sixteen, although I
            cannot boast of any Marcels).
            >
            > Marc-cum-Unifex's dual presence in time (and sometimes
            even in space) is a source of endless fascination. How is it
            possible for the one persona to confront and coerce the other, as
            happens in 'Jack the Bodiless'? Is Unifex following young Marc or
            leading him? I feel it is a sign of JM's quality that she is not
            afraid to raise such questions and leave us to work out our own
            answers, instead of trying to pre-ordain all our responses as so
            many popular writers do.
            >
            > For me the most moving passage in either the Exiles or the
            Milieu series is Teresa's conversation about God with her unborn
            baby - I say this without any doctrinal prejudice, since my
            background is Jewish and my belief as formless as a Tanu's - and her
            magical Christmas present to Rogi which immediately follows. I am
            almost afraid to become acquainted with the Rimsky-Korsakoff opera,
            which I have never heard; if I came to this passage with the
            additional stimulus of having the appropriate music in my head, I
            would probably keel over and die of emotion like a Gi!
            >
            > Oliver Mundy.
            >
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