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Re: News of the Weird - Study on Telepathy

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  • Alex von Thorn
    That s given me an idea for a convention presentation. Thanks. ... Alex von Thorn http://worldhouse.com/alex/ You know me, I m all for helping people.
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 11, 2005
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      That's given me an idea for a convention presentation. Thanks.



      Message: 1        
         Date: Thu, 10 Mar 2005 11:50:20 +1300
         From: Nicolette Lewer <n.lewer@...>
      Subject: News of the Weird  - Study on Telepathy

      Hi folks,

      News of the Weird time with the following article about a study on
      telepathy. Note the interesting reference to Hawaiian healers...

      High Thoughts
      - Nicolette :-)



      PROVING THE PATIENT-DOCTOR BRAIN BOND, TELEPATHICALLY
      By Mary Sawyers
      Ivanhoe Newswire
      March 1, 2005

      http://search.ivanhoe.com/channels/p_channelstory.cfm?storyid=10697&channelid=CHAN-100000

      PORTLAND, Ore. - You¹ve heard of telepathy -- it¹s when you can
      communicate with someone just by thinking about it. Now, a researcher in
      Seattle says her studies show that, at least for some people, it works.

      Leanna Standish, ND, Ph.D., a neuroscientist at Bastyr University in
      Seattle, calls the phenomenon "distant neural signaling." She agrees it
      sounds kind of whacky, and she can¹t explain why it works with some
      people and not others, but after several experiments, she¹s convinced
      the phenomenon is real.

      In one study, Standish recruited 30 pairs of volunteers who knew each
      other and in some cases were related. The pairs spent 10 minutes
      meditating together and were then sent to separate rooms 30 feet apart.
        The "sending" partner watched checkerboard patterns flicker on and off
      on a video monitor, while the "receiving" partner watched a static
      pattern. Both of the partners were hooked up to electroencephalograms
      (EEGs) to measure their brain activity.

      When the pattern flickered, it triggered increased brain activity in the
      "sender." "What we were trying to see was if the increased brain
      activity in the sender would correspond with increased activity in the
      receiver," says Standish.

      The experiment showed this increased activity in five out of the 60
      receivers. That means this brain connection didn¹t happen in the
      majority of the partners, but Standish says, "If it happens even once,
      it¹s kind of amazing."

      To make sure the connections that did happen were not just coincidence,
      Standish repeated the same experiment, but this time she was the
      "receiver" and she was lying in a functional magnetic resonance imaging
      scanner ­ with several inches of lead and a magnetic field separating
      her from the "sender."

      Brain scans show that even when shielded by the MRI, blood flow to
      Standish¹s brain increased in sync with the "sender." However, when the
      pair switched places and Standish acted as the "sender," the
      "receiver¹s" brain did not show the increased blood flow.

      In a third experiment, Standish¹s colleagues at North Hawaii Community
      Hospital in Kamuela asked traditional Hawaiian healers to try to send
      brain signals to "receivers" who were laying in the MRI scanners. In all
      but one of the cases, Standish says the healer was able to produce
      increased brain activity in the "receiver."

      Standish says she doesn¹t know how these signals traveled between
      brains,and she doesn¹t know if the healer was actually healing, but she
      says something is going on, and it deserves more study.

      This article was reported by Ivanhoe.com, who offers Medical Alerts by
      e-mail every day of the week. To subscribe, go to:

      http://www.ivanhoe.com/newsalert/

      SOURCE: Presented at the "Paradigm Shift" Conference in Portland, Ore.,
      Feb. 26-27, 2005



      Alex von Thorn
      http://worldhouse.com/alex/

      "You know me, I'm all for helping people."
          --O'Neill, Stargate SG-1 ("Birthright")

    • Nicolette Lewer
      Hi Bob, Now I m intrigued - what does Mahalo Nui mean? I m glad you liked the article. High Thoughts - Nicolette :-) ...
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 13, 2005
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        Hi Bob,

        Now I'm intrigued - what does 'Mahalo Nui' mean?

        I'm glad you liked the article.


        High Thoughts
        - Nicolette :-)



        On 11/03/2005 1:51 a.m., Robert Powell wrote:
        >
        > That is so cool - Mahalo Nui (Little bit of touristy Hawaiian for
        > you *smile*) for posting it Nicolette. Hey if we all try at once
        > maybe we could contact Leda!
        >
        > Nah - not until the winter arrives down there I'm guessing! *grin*
        >
        >
        >
        >

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      • Nicolette Lewer
        Hi Alex, You re welcome! I m glad you can find a further use for it. High Thoughts - Nicolette :-) ...
        Message 3 of 9 , Mar 13, 2005
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          Hi Alex,

          You're welcome! I'm glad you can find a further use for it.

          High Thoughts
          - Nicolette :-)


          On 12/03/2005 10:32 a.m., Alex von Thorn wrote:
          > That's given me an idea for a convention presentation. Thanks.
          >
          >

          ======================================================================
          Living on Earth may be expensive, but it includes an annual free trip
          around the sun.
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        • Robert Powell
          ... Hello Creative Sister The Hawaiians have a very simple language and the meaning of a word can change depending on the context in which it is used;
          Message 4 of 9 , Mar 15, 2005
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            --- In Julian-May-discuss@yahoogroups.com, Nicolette Lewer
            <n.lewer@n...> wrote:
            > Hi Bob,
            >
            > Now I'm intrigued - what does 'Mahalo Nui' mean?
            >
            > I'm glad you liked the article.
            >
            >
            > High Thoughts
            > - Nicolette :-)
            >
            <snip>

            Hello Creative Sister

            The Hawaiians have a very simple language and the meaning of a word
            can change depending on the context in which it is used; the most
            obvious and familiar example being 'Aloha', which is used for both a
            greeting and a farewell, but also has a deeper meaning of good
            wishes, love and respect.

            'Mahalo' in this context means thank you (it can also mean praise,
            esteem, regards, respect, admiration, praise and several other
            things!)

            'Nui' adds emphasis.

            So a literal translation of 'Mahalo Nui', is in this context: Thank
            you very much. *smile*

            There are a fair few Hawaiian to English websites, though sadly few
            translating the other way, but if you'd like a quick intro, try this:

            http://www.aloha-hawaii.com/hawaii/native+tongue/

            Remember though, that with the exception of the odd phrase thrown in
            for the tourists – that'll be me then *grin* - the Hawaiian Language
            is not widely used outside of the more isolated communities. I
            expect the `Forbidden Isle' of Niihau does and the less touristy
            islands such as, Molokai and Lanai might but certainly the main
            islands' communities all speak English as a first language – well as
            close as Americans can get *grin* - and use a `Pidgin', as Malama
            does in the Milieu series, in their own homes and communities.

            This is not to denigrate Pidgin, which in itself is a wonderful and
            colourful language. Indeed I found it fascinating that a lot of the
            slang terminology was familiar to me through exposure to UK
            colloquialisms, such as Glaswegian, Brummie, Scouse, Geordie,
            Cockney, etc. which I guess is a legacy of the British whalers,
            traders and settlers that came to the islands in the past.

            Pidgin itself though is dying out, which is a hideous prospect in my
            opinion; every language that dies brings us closer to uniformity and
            a sterile generic racial identity, and edges us closer to being a
            mongrel stagnant people, culturally bereft and...

            Damn, sorry I appear to have climbed on to a soapbox, I do
            apologise. I hate it when that happens, don't you? *smile*

            Now then, as you're a Kiwi, it might be interesting to see if there
            are derivations of the Hawaiian words within the Maori language as
            both islands indigenous populations are descended from the same
            Polynesian roots.

            Thus endeth the lesson for today, please study chapters 8 through 12
            for a test in the morning. *grin*

            Regards - or Aloha if you prefer

            Bob
          • Nicolette Lewer
            Hi Bob, Thanks for the Hawaiian language lesson (grin) - I will be sure to check out the link. Yes, as a Kiwi it will be interesting to check if there are any
            Message 5 of 9 , Mar 15, 2005
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              Hi Bob,

              Thanks for the Hawaiian language lesson (grin) - I will be sure to check
              out the link.

              Yes, as a Kiwi it will be interesting to check if there are any
              similarities between Hawaiian words and Maori. Certainly I know there
              are links between Maori words and South American words - apparently the
              word 'kumara' (which means sweet potato) is used both here and in South
              America.


              Aloha,
              - Nicolette :-)

              (who is of the firm belief that people in the really old days travelled
              around the world instead of cowering in caves)


              On 15/03/2005 11:01 p.m., Robert Powell wrote:
              >
              > --- In Julian-May-discuss@yahoogroups.com, Nicolette Lewer
              > <n.lewer@n...> wrote:
              >
              >>Hi Bob,
              >>
              >>Now I'm intrigued - what does 'Mahalo Nui' mean?
              >>
              >>I'm glad you liked the article.
              >>
              >>
              >>High Thoughts
              >>- Nicolette :-)
              >>
              >
              > <snip>
              >
              > Hello Creative Sister
              >
              > The Hawaiians have a very simple language and the meaning of a word
              > can change depending on the context in which it is used; the most
              > obvious and familiar example being 'Aloha', which is used for both a
              > greeting and a farewell, but also has a deeper meaning of good
              > wishes, love and respect.
              >
              > 'Mahalo' in this context means thank you (it can also mean praise,
              > esteem, regards, respect, admiration, praise and several other
              > things!)
              >
              > 'Nui' adds emphasis.
              >
              > So a literal translation of 'Mahalo Nui', is in this context: Thank
              > you very much. *smile*
              >
              > There are a fair few Hawaiian to English websites, though sadly few
              > translating the other way, but if you'd like a quick intro, try this:
              >
              > http://www.aloha-hawaii.com/hawaii/native+tongue/
              >
              > Remember though, that with the exception of the odd phrase thrown in
              > for the tourists – that'll be me then *grin* - the Hawaiian Language
              > is not widely used outside of the more isolated communities. I
              > expect the `Forbidden Isle' of Niihau does and the less touristy
              > islands such as, Molokai and Lanai might but certainly the main
              > islands' communities all speak English as a first language – well as
              > close as Americans can get *grin* - and use a `Pidgin', as Malama
              > does in the Milieu series, in their own homes and communities.
              >
              > This is not to denigrate Pidgin, which in itself is a wonderful and
              > colourful language. Indeed I found it fascinating that a lot of the
              > slang terminology was familiar to me through exposure to UK
              > colloquialisms, such as Glaswegian, Brummie, Scouse, Geordie,
              > Cockney, etc. which I guess is a legacy of the British whalers,
              > traders and settlers that came to the islands in the past.
              >
              > Pidgin itself though is dying out, which is a hideous prospect in my
              > opinion; every language that dies brings us closer to uniformity and
              > a sterile generic racial identity, and edges us closer to being a
              > mongrel stagnant people, culturally bereft and...
              >
              > Damn, sorry I appear to have climbed on to a soapbox, I do
              > apologise. I hate it when that happens, don't you? *smile*
              >
              > Now then, as you're a Kiwi, it might be interesting to see if there
              > are derivations of the Hawaiian words within the Maori language as
              > both islands indigenous populations are descended from the same
              > Polynesian roots.
              >
              > Thus endeth the lesson for today, please study chapters 8 through 12
              > for a test in the morning. *grin*
              >
              > Regards - or Aloha if you prefer
              >
              > Bob
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor --------------------~-->
              > In low income neighborhoods, 84% do not own computers.
              > At Network for Good, help bridge the Digital Divide!
              > http://us.click.yahoo.com/S.QlOD/3MnJAA/Zx0JAA/FIyolB/TM


              ======================================================================
              Living on Earth may be expensive, but it includes an annual free trip
              around the sun.
              ======================================================================
            • Cleomadjai
              Interestingly enough the Maori homeland or at least where the seven great canoe s that colonised NZ were from Hawaiiki. Most people take it as being Hawaii,
              Message 6 of 9 , Mar 31, 2005
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                Interestingly enough the Maori 'homeland' or at least where the seven great canoe's that colonised NZ were from Hawaiiki.  Most people take it as being Hawaii, but you never know.  I even heard a theory that the Maori may have decended from the Egyptians.  Not a popular or provable theory  as you can imagine. 
                 
                Cleo

                Nicolette Lewer <n.lewer@...> wrote:

                Hi Bob,

                Thanks for the Hawaiian language lesson (grin) - I will be sure to check
                out the link.

                Yes, as a Kiwi it will be interesting to check if there are any
                similarities between Hawaiian words and Maori. Certainly I know there
                are links between Maori words and South American words - apparently the
                word 'kumara' (which means sweet potato) is used both here and in South
                America.


                Aloha,
                - Nicolette :-)

                (who is of the firm belief that people in the really old days travelled
                around the world instead of cowering in caves)


                On 15/03/2005 11:01 p.m., Robert Powell wrote:
                >
                > --- In Julian-May-discuss@yahoogroups.com, Nicolette Lewer
                > wrote:
                >
                >>Hi Bob,
                >>
                >>Now I'm intrigued - what does 'Mahalo Nui' mean?
                >>
                >>I'm glad you liked the article.
                >>
                >>
                >>High Thoughts
                >>- Nicolette :-)
                >>
                >
                >
                >
                > Hello Creative Sister
                >
                > The Hawaiians have a very simple language and the meaning of a word
                > can change depending on the context in which it is used; the most
                > obvious and familiar example being 'Aloha', which is used for both a
                > greeting and a farewell, but also has a deeper meaning of good
                > wishes, love and respect.
                >
                > 'Mahalo' in this context means thank you (it can also mean praise,
                > esteem, regards, respect, admiration, praise and several other
                > things!)
                >
                > 'Nui' adds emphasis.
                >
                > So a literal translation of 'Mahalo Nui', is in this context: Thank
                > you very much. *smile*
                >
                > There are a fair few Hawaiian to English websites, though sadly few
                > translating the other way, but if you'd like a quick intro, try this:
                >
                > http://www.aloha-hawaii.com/hawaii/native+tongue/
                >
                > Remember though, that with the exception of the odd phrase thrown in
                > for the tourists – that'll be me then *grin* - the Hawaiian Language
                > is not widely used outside of the more isolated communities. I
                > expect the `Forbidden Isle' of Niihau does and the less touristy
                > islands such as, Molokai and Lanai might but certainly the main
                > islands' communities all speak English as a first language – well as
                > close as Americans can get *grin* - and use a `Pidgin', as Malama
                > does in the Milieu series, in their own homes and communities.
                >
                > This is not to denigrate Pidgin, which in itself is a wonderful and
                > colourful language. Indeed I found it fascinating that a lot of the
                > slang terminology was familiar to me through exposure to UK
                > colloquialisms, such as Glaswegian, Brummie, Scouse, Geordie,
                > Cockney, etc. which I guess is a legacy of the British whalers,
                > traders and settlers that came to the islands in the past.
                >
                > Pidgin itself though is dying out, which is a hideous prospect in my
                > opinion; every language that dies brings us closer to uniformity and
                > a sterile generic racial identity, and edges us closer to being a
                > mongrel stagnant people, culturally bereft and...
                >
                > Damn, sorry I appear to have climbed on to a soapbox, I do
                > apologise. I hate it when that happens, don't you? *smile*
                >
                > Now then, as you're a Kiwi, it might be interesting to see if there
                > are derivations of the Hawaiian words within the Maori language as
                > both islands indigenous populations are descended from the same
                > Polynesian roots.
                >
                > Thus endeth the lesson for today, please study chapters 8 through 12
                > for a test in the morning. *grin*
                >
                > Regards - or Aloha if you prefer
                >
                > Bob
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor --------------------~-->
                > In low income neighborhoods, 84% do not own computers.
                > At Network for Good, help bridge the Digital Divide!
                > http://us.click.yahoo.com/S.QlOD/3MnJAA/Zx0JAA/FIyolB/TM


                ======================================================================
                Living on Earth may be expensive, but it includes an annual free trip
                around the sun.
                ======================================================================





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              • Nicolette Lewer
                Hi Cleo, Ah yes, the mysterious Hawaiiki. There are many theories about this Maori homeland including one that it was really a lost continent in the
                Message 7 of 9 , Mar 31, 2005
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                  Hi Cleo,

                  Ah yes, the mysterious Hawaiiki. There are many theories about this
                  'Maori homeland' including one that it was really a 'lost continent'
                  in the Pacific...yes, the Pacific is said to have had its own kind of
                  Atlantis...


                  High Thoughts
                  - Nicolette :-)



                  --- In Julian-May-discuss@yahoogroups.com, Cleomadjai
                  <cleomadjai@y...> wrote:
                  > Interestingly enough the Maori 'homeland' or at least where the
                  seven great canoe's that colonised NZ were from Hawaiiki. Most people
                  take it as being Hawaii, but you never know. I even heard a theory
                  that the Maori may have decended from the Egyptians. Not a popular or
                  provable theory as you can imagine.
                  >
                  > Cleo
                  >
                  messenger.yahoo.com
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