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New member - The 'World Mind' before Teilhard?

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  • OLIVER MUNDY
    I am delighted to have discovered this list. English, middle-aged (almost from birth) and I believe an ideal candidate for the Auberge, I have treasured the
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 11, 2005
      I am delighted to have discovered this list. English, middle-aged
      (almost from birth) and I believe an ideal candidate for the Auberge, I have
      treasured the Saga of the Exiles for more than twenty years, afterwards
      gobbling up the Milieu series no less eagerly as the books finally
      appeared - though I must confess to a tinge of sadness on each re-reading of
      'Intervention', as date after date in JM's alternative history is overtaken
      by its real-life equivalent without any corresponding sign that the
      metapsychic revolution is drawing any nearer.

      Those who are interested in the theories of Teilhard de Chardin,
      which loom so large in JM's work, may like to know of a striking
      prefigurement of his 'World Mind' doctrine. It occurs in 'Sur la Pierre
      Blanche', by 'Anatole France' (J.A.F. Thibaut: 1844-1924), published in
      1905 (when Teilhard was still a student) and translated as 'The White Stone'
      in 1910. The book is a curious series of episodes - philosophical
      conversations among a group of archaeologists, sketches of life in the
      ancient world, and finally a vision of the future. Towards the end France
      comments on the accelerating pace and widening range of communication and
      concludes, just as Teilhard and his followers were to do, that these purely
      mechanical advances were only a prelude to a true outreach from mind to
      mind, destined to end in some unprecedented from of worldwide harmony. It
      is only a paragraph or two, but might it not have given the young priest the
      first impulse towards his later ideas?

      Oliver Mundy.
    • Nicolette Lewer
      Hi Oliver, Hello and welcome to the group - the more people the merrier! There are certainly a few other people here who enjoy reading the books today as much
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 14, 2005
        Hi Oliver,

        Hello and welcome to the group - the more people the merrier! There are
        certainly a few other people here who enjoy reading the books today as
        much as they did when they originally came out.

        Although we aren't heading to a metapsychic revolution in the same way
        as in 'Intervention' I like to think society these days is becoming more
        tolerant towards 'fringe' things as the real possibility of telepathy
        (see my recent posting about an article on this subject).

        Thanks for your mention of the way that Teilhard de Chardin could have
        been inspired - it might have happened that way, you never know!

        High Thoughts
        - Nicolette :-)


        ======================================================================
        Living on Earth may be expensive, but it includes an annual free trip
        around the sun.
        ======================================================================


        On 12/03/2005 10:37 a.m., OLIVER MUNDY wrote:
        > I am delighted to have discovered this list. English, middle-aged
        > (almost from birth) and I believe an ideal candidate for the Auberge, I have
        > treasured the Saga of the Exiles for more than twenty years, afterwards
        > gobbling up the Milieu series no less eagerly as the books finally
        > appeared - though I must confess to a tinge of sadness on each re-reading of
        > 'Intervention', as date after date in JM's alternative history is overtaken
        > by its real-life equivalent without any corresponding sign that the
        > metapsychic revolution is drawing any nearer.
        >
        > Those who are interested in the theories of Teilhard de Chardin,
        > which loom so large in JM's work, may like to know of a striking
        > prefigurement of his 'World Mind' doctrine. It occurs in 'Sur la Pierre
        > Blanche', by 'Anatole France' (J.A.F. Thibaut: 1844-1924), published in
        > 1905 (when Teilhard was still a student) and translated as 'The White Stone'
        > in 1910. The book is a curious series of episodes - philosophical
        > conversations among a group of archaeologists, sketches of life in the
        > ancient world, and finally a vision of the future. Towards the end France
        > comments on the accelerating pace and widening range of communication and
        > concludes, just as Teilhard and his followers were to do, that these purely
        > mechanical advances were only a prelude to a true outreach from mind to
        > mind, destined to end in some unprecedented from of worldwide harmony. It
        > is only a paragraph or two, but might it not have given the young priest the
        > first impulse towards his later ideas?
        >
        > Oliver Mundy.
        >
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