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Flight, Fratricide, Genocide and Flight

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  • Alix/PDW
    Rogi is able to free the young Denis from the grip of the Furies around him, but he is too late to protect him from the Fury within. Fury can only emerge when
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 30, 2004

         Rogi is able to free the young Denis from the grip of the Furies around him, but he is too late to protect him from the Fury  within. Fury can only emerge when Denis is asleep � and this may well be a key to why Denis allows the comatose Victor to survive for so long.

        Fury as an independently defined character is a bravura turn of the writer�s art, but in life, of course, the Furies in many human beings can never emerge into full, independent beings precisely because they are fragments of personalities, not whole beings. The best example from other writers is Tolkien�s Gollum concept (modeled in part on the golem of Hebrew legend, a sort of  zombie/Frankenstein creation), a once-normal human being who has survived with his guilty secrets by cutting himself off from the rest of humanity, but changed beyond all recognition. And Fury is not a matter of changed genetics, but a metaphoric portrait of an all-too-common human psychological pattern, drawn in the bold strokes of Julian May�s art.

        Of all this core Remillard group, Victor comes the closest to a fully realized Fury personality, knowing when to conceal his powers and when he can exercise them in safety. He is, consciously, almost totally amoral, and almost totally incapable of genuine love. He reaches out at a very early age to damage the minds of any siblings who might grow strong enough to challenge him, to thwart his will or blow the whistle and expose him to a society likely to permanently confine him at least, or destroy him outright. Only he and Kieran O�Connor (the fugitive Hydra children being mostly cardboard golems), can ever really sustain this pattern of a Fury in full control of the conscious mind, and both do so at the cost of isolation in the prison-fortresses they build for themselves They can seduce or force the few into accepting or following them, but they are still afraid of real exposure to a society that will never accept them as they really are.

         Denis escapes this pattern of active abuse as a young boy, with both defensive use of his own developing powers and the assistance of his uncle Rogi, by finding a much safer nurturing environment in the private boarding school where his teachers can begin to understand and help him learn and grow. He does this by totally sealing off from conscious awareness and day-to-day living that part of himself which is Fury. The adult Denis has acquired enormous moral strength, enough to build a matrix of research and development that will lead in guiding humanity into a fuller understanding of its own powers on the existing evolutionary continuum � metapsychic powers being already a part of human nature in the world as depicted by JM � and enough to order his own execution once forced into the terrible self-knowledge of being Fury�s unwilling host. Meanwhile, he has also managed to continue the Remillard line, producing mostly healthy offspring who can resist Fury�s blandishments. We aren�t given many clues about Paul�s inner life � he is too useful in illuminating humanity�s integration into the Galactic Milieu � but Anne�s temptation by and rejection of Fury serves well enough as an example.

         It�s tempting at this point to turn to Neo-Freudian ideas and familiar duality patterns, and they may well be valid. (So might any use of ideas from Bruno Bettelheim or T.S. Eliot, but both are in such poor intellectual odor right now that we risk running even further astray.) If we wish to understand  the death of Matthieu, it is important to understand the Fury paradigm, both in microcosm as it is passed from generation to generation, and in the wider frame, the collective unconscious, where it becomes a fount of man�s inhumanity to man. We want to dismiss, to deny, that wailing infant, that terrified, hungry, angry child with his endless need to bend his environment to his will � a subject most people are uncomfortable with, and many are downright hostile to for fairly obvious reasons � but we need to follow his passage into adult personality disorder, writ large or small, because he is our best chance at understanding Fury�s motivation.

        In normal family conditions, that infantile cry is a natural expression of need, with some minimal quotient of fear and anger attached, and any number of possible environmental and hereditary factors affecting degrees of intensity and duration. Anyone who has spent time talking with as many as a dozen mothers, or simply observing very young children, knows that some babies are born placid and happy, and some babies are born cranky. But if we look at the norm, that wail is usually met with the longed-for nurturing response: feed me, keep me warm and dry, give me light so I can see, hold me close so I can feel your heartbeat, teach me to use these hands and legs and voice, give me loving affirmation. It is one of the infant�s first manifestations of the will to survive, and normally it will morph into the �please� and �may I� or simply �I want� of childhood.

        Factor in child abuse, even that limited to verbal hostility that shows primarily in the voice (and children tend to sense such attitudes far more readily than adults), and you present the infant with a terrible dilemma: His only means of summoning help to survive may also amount to summoning the threat of destruction, yet he must persist and endure the punishment because he cannot survive on his own. (According to neonatalists, extreme neglect is even worse than non-lethal abuse, and is frequently fatal in itself, not our central issue here, but useful in considering Madeleine and her laboratory full of little biologically maimed beings.) The infant�s response to abuse may make him more quiet, or even louder, but it will inevitably increase his fear and anger, and his need to control his environment and feed his appetites will assume a terrible, overwhelming intensity likely to make his resulting behavior endure into adolescence and adulthood as the archaic defense mechanisms we know today as personality disorders (or worse, again depending on other factors).

         To the infant, his entire world has become a hostile environment, which he must somehow manipulate to get what he needs, any way he can. Place this in the context of the Remillard family and their remarkable natural powers, and it is easy to understand the emergence of Fury and his/its chosen means of survival. If we consider the will to survive as the ultimate foundation of the struggle toward perfection, the yearning to learn and grow and increase in level of being (or, if you will, to progress along Teilhard�s Great Chain of Being), it is easier to understand Felice�s catastrophic choice after she is cured of her inability to think rationally. She has chosen the only relation to the world that she believes will allow her to survive without loss of identity: Know your enemies and endure until you can conquer, seek the negative bond and pursue it to the end.

         We can�t really know what the Victor-Fury was capable of during the long years of his coma, any more than we can be sure of the level of consciousness of anyone in a coma, but we are told plainly enough that the Denis-Fury reaches out to enslave the minds of unborn Remillard young, the eventual Hydra children, during that final gathering while Denis is fully conscious, even though Denis has no conscious awareness of this act. In sealing off the Fury-being, the sum of his unacceptably hostile and irrationally fearful impulses, Denis has rendered himself virtually incapable of controlling the Fury once he is forced into full realization of it by the misguided metaconcert. Fury holds almost all the weapons, including the exercise of Denis�s formidable metapsychic powers, and he can begin to shape his little army of golems from living Remillard flesh, rewarding them with the same horrors Victor came to crave because he came to associate them with nurturing sustenance: sexual abuse, murderous subsumption of psychic energies, and power over others based in amoral exercise of natural talents, and the freedom of action based in total disregard of the harm they might do to other human beings.

         There is no reason to assume, given the growing occurrence of sentient consciousness in utero among Remillard young of this era, that this is the Fury entity�s first such contact, and we know that he           continues for many years afterwards pitching his dark plans for galactic domination to Marc, this supreme young family talent, during his sleeping hours, playing on sexual weaknesses as well as the will to power. (And no wonder the adult Marc abstains from sexual contact much of the time, fearing it will drain the strength he needs for his work. It drains his will to resist Fury during his dreams even as an adult paramount metapsychic, never mind that he associates this consciously with the negative role model presented by his promiscuous absentee father.) Still, Marc does resist this voice, and his resistance implies a recognition of threat � why else would an infant mind resist? � and here we come to the prenatal presence of Matthieu. We don�t know that Marc understands the concept �brother� at this point, or that he loves or hates this other living entity sharing the only world he really knows, but the occasional intrusions of Fury must mean that he has identified a questionable Other unlike the loving mother that surrounds and sustains him. We also know, from the perspective of hindsight, that his prenatal mind, at least, was not nearly as strong as Jack�s � and even the infant Jack, who could defend himself with mental powers developed to fantastic level from Fury�s attempt to murder him, required  years more of learning how to relate to those around him.

        While Marc may actually have physically killed his brother by strangling him, as May�s story goes, it is doubtful that it could have involved anything more than a confused self defense carried out in dimly vague awareness, an attempt to fend off the discomfiting Other � and it may well be nothing more than accident for which Marc later assumes a false guilt.

        Marc�s character is not ever one given to hostile rages, with perhaps the single exception of his punishment of Hagen in the Exile fishing incident. It is a well-known psychological pattern of young children to assume guilt for death or catastrophic harm to those around them, in order to gain a (false) sense of control over a personal world run amok for no reason � guilt by way of magical powers: Dad  must have fallen off that ladder and broken all those bones because I was so mad at him I wished he would just go away/have to suffer too/die. We have already entered the post-Intervention era in which in utero communication is possible, and those magical powers are a growing reality, but the real beginning of Marc�s transformation into a cold-blooded theoretician and self-elected savior capable of both fratricide and mass murder awaits the birth of his beloved Baby Jack.

         The adolescent Marc thwarts the authority of his father and the Milieu to aid the flight of the pregnant Teresa as an act of protective love, not as an act of rebellion. And even though he blames his father�s rather callous indifference, in large part, for the later death of the grieving Teresa, Paul remains chiefly an inconvenient roadblock, not a hated deadly enemy. What breaks Marc�s young heart and diverts him from his destiny as a natural leader of the new human order and the Galactic Milieu is his inevitable failure to rescue Jack from the terrible genetically programmed deterioration that will rob him of most biological aspects of his humanity, especially his ability to reproduce and pass along to posterity his superior genetic heritage, or even to protect him from Fury�s attempt to destroy him. But Jack has had time to identify the enemy and learn a highly effective defense that harms no one, and even covers the naked brain of his final form in a human shape he spins from ordinary materials that allows him to relate to others as a normal boy.

         Miraculous powers, indeed, and at a level that we can begin to identify as a real evolutionary jump, rather than a revelation of powers that have lain dormant in humans for untold ages � although Marc�s �immortality� gene is a much clearer sign of evolutionary change. Marc is relatively secure in his own powers, in his whole handsome, strong, charismatic presence, his superior sportsmanship and his natural place as an intellectual prodigy, Paramount Grand Master metapsychic,  and a natural leader. He recognizes Jack as a superior mental and spiritual being without jealousy or resentment. To Marc, Jack is the true homo superior, free of the limiting physical aspects of the human animal.

         It is here that Marc�s belief in Mental Man is born, perhaps in part due to the repeated persuasions of the Fury who speaks to him in dreams, and with it his determination to duplicate the near-bodiless biological framework. Jack, who has long accepted his real nature as an evolutionary dead end, despite nurturing every bit of humanity in himself than he can identify and master, is horrified when he realizes what his brother is doing. The Fury entity, which  has by now assumed its own full demonic persona in relating to the Remillards, complete with the Hydra cadre, observes Marc�s total commitment to the development of Mental Man with triumphant delight, because he believes he can assume ultimate control of these superior beings, and with it galactic domination and a position in which no harm can touch him. He can reign, he thinks, unchallenged and with his twisted and incomplete identity intact, as the eternal, inimical Other, feeding on the entire sum of sentient beings in the Galaxy. He cannot win, of course, as Unifex calmly tells him. And we see the real counter to Fury in Aiken Drum, who commits a few similar horrors along the way, but can be cleansed of their contaminating results, because he has taken his place as natural leader of his own kind, no longer the defiant Other.

        Marc has finally challenged the gods, indeed, and will persist to the point of final condemnation within the Galactic Milieu, risking not only his own destruction and that of the Rebels he has agreed to lead, but the ejection of humanity from Milieu membership with a permanent sentence of planetary house arrest. Mark has become leader of the Rebels, though, less out of conviction than of recognition that his best talents for the Mental Man project will become lost to him otherwise, and he is already in trouble with the Milieu on development of his cerebroenergetic enhancers.

         Before they and Paul are vaporized by Marc's weapons in the final Milieu conflict at Okanagon, Jack and Diamond redeem their suspect race with a metaconcert of their own, bringing humanity and the other Milieu races into a total harmonic Unity. Only Marc and his cerametal-clad Rebel cohorts remain outside their state of grace, reducing the population of Okanagon to a cinder, and almost completely destroyed themselves by a refraction of their own firepower.

         Mark and his closest followers will escape, aided by Unifex, into Pliocene Exile, taking their children with them, and isolating themselves from the troubled collection of humanity they find there. Fury and the Hydra children have been destroyed, the Remillard clan finally healed of guilt and fear, and even Unifex will pass into another dimension, having completed his own mission. It is up to Mark, now, to learn the meaning of his own humanity, and begin his last, long journey toward redemption.

        

       

       

    • evrhett
      Dear Brede!!!!! THAT was quite a narative! I thoroughly enjoyed it and your take on it. Maybe Julian May will see it at one point. Makes me wonder if
      Message 2 of 2 , Jan 28, 2005
        Dear Brede!!!!! THAT was quite a narative! I thoroughly enjoyed it
        and your take on it. Maybe Julian May will see it at one point.
        Makes me wonder if authors go "OMG" when we see so much in their
        works that maybe they did not intend, but nonetheless ends up being
        such a great and plausible interpretation! Truly enjoyed it Alix!

        --- In Julian-May-discuss@yahoogroups.com, Alix/PDW <alixnc@y...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Rogi is able to free the young Denis from the grip of the Furies
        around him, but he is too late to protect him from the Fury within.
        Fury can only emerge when Denis is asleep … and this may well be a
        key to why Denis allows the comatose Victor to survive for so long.
        >
        > Fury as an independently defined character is a bravura turn of
        the writer's art, but in life, of course, the Furies in many human
        beings can never emerge into full, independent beings precisely
        because they are fragments of personalities, not whole beings. The
        best example from other writers is Tolkien's Gollum concept (modeled
        in part on the golem of Hebrew legend, a sort of zombie/Frankenstein
        creation), a once-normal human being who has survived with his guilty
        secrets by cutting himself off from the rest of humanity, but changed
        beyond all recognition. And Fury is not a matter of changed genetics,
        but a metaphoric portrait of an all-too-common human psychological
        pattern, drawn in the bold strokes of Julian May's art.
        >
        > Of all this core Remillard group, Victor comes the closest to a
        fully realized Fury personality, knowing when to conceal his powers
        and when he can exercise them in safety. He is, consciously, almost
        totally amoral, and almost totally incapable of genuine love. He
        reaches out at a very early age to damage the minds of any siblings
        who might grow strong enough to challenge him, to thwart his will or
        blow the whistle and expose him to a society likely to permanently
        confine him at least, or destroy him outright. Only he and Kieran
        O'Connor (the fugitive Hydra children being mostly cardboard golems),
        can ever really sustain this pattern of a Fury in full control of the
        conscious mind, and both do so at the cost of isolation in the prison-
        fortresses they build for themselves They can seduce or force the few
        into accepting or following them, but they are still afraid of real
        exposure to a society that will never accept them as they really are.
        >
        > Denis escapes this pattern of active abuse as a young boy, with
        both defensive use of his own developing powers and the assistance of
        his uncle Rogi, by finding a much safer nurturing environment in the
        private boarding school where his teachers can begin to understand
        and help him learn and grow. He does this by totally sealing off from
        conscious awareness and day-to-day living that part of himself which
        is Fury. The adult Denis has acquired enormous moral strength, enough
        to build a matrix of research and development that will lead in
        guiding humanity into a fuller understanding of its own powers on the
        existing evolutionary continuum – metapsychic powers being already a
        part of human nature in the world as depicted by JM – and enough to
        order his own execution once forced into the terrible self-knowledge
        of being Fury's unwilling host. Meanwhile, he has also managed to
        continue the Remillard line, producing mostly healthy offspring who
        can resist Fury's blandishments. We aren't
        > given many clues about Paul's inner life – he is too useful in
        illuminating humanity's integration into the Galactic Milieu – but
        Anne's temptation by and rejection of Fury serves well enough as an
        example.
        >
        > It's tempting at this point to turn to Neo-Freudian ideas and
        familiar duality patterns, and they may well be valid. (So might any
        use of ideas from Bruno Bettelheim or T.S. Eliot, but both are in
        such poor intellectual odor right now that we risk running even
        further astray.) If we wish to understand the death of Matthieu, it
        is important to understand the Fury paradigm, both in microcosm as it
        is passed from generation to generation, and in the wider frame, the
        collective unconscious, where it becomes a fount of man's inhumanity
        to man. We want to dismiss, to deny, that wailing infant, that
        terrified, hungry, angry child with his endless need to bend his
        environment to his will – a subject most people are uncomfortable
        with, and many are downright hostile to for fairly obvious reasons –
        but we need to follow his passage into adult personality disorder,
        writ large or small, because he is our best chance at understanding
        Fury's motivation.
        >
        > In normal family conditions, that infantile cry is a natural
        expression of need, with some minimal quotient of fear and anger
        attached, and any number of possible environmental and hereditary
        factors affecting degrees of intensity and duration. Anyone who has
        spent time talking with as many as a dozen mothers, or simply
        observing very young children, knows that some babies are born placid
        and happy, and some babies are born cranky. But if we look at the
        norm, that wail is usually met with the longed-for nurturing
        response: feed me, keep me warm and dry, give me light so I can see,
        hold me close so I can feel your heartbeat, teach me to use these
        hands and legs and voice, give me loving affirmation. It is one of
        the infant's first manifestations of the will to survive, and
        normally it will morph into the "please" and "may I" or simply "I
        want" of childhood.
        >
        > Factor in child abuse, even that limited to verbal hostility that
        shows primarily in the voice (and children tend to sense such
        attitudes far more readily than adults), and you present the infant
        with a terrible dilemma: His only means of summoning help to survive
        may also amount to summoning the threat of destruction, yet he must
        persist and endure the punishment because he cannot survive on his
        own. (According to neonatalists, extreme neglect is even worse than
        non-lethal abuse, and is frequently fatal in itself, not our central
        issue here, but useful in considering Madeleine and her laboratory
        full of little biologically maimed beings.) The infant's response to
        abuse may make him more quiet, or even louder, but it will inevitably
        increase his fear and anger, and his need to control his environment
        and feed his appetites will assume a terrible, overwhelming intensity
        likely to make his resulting behavior endure into adolescence and
        adulthood as the archaic defense mechanisms we
        > know today as personality disorders (or worse, again depending on
        other factors).
        >
        > To the infant, his entire world has become a hostile
        environment, which he must somehow manipulate to get what he needs,
        any way he can. Place this in the context of the Remillard family and
        their remarkable natural powers, and it is easy to understand the
        emergence of Fury and his/its chosen means of survival. If we
        consider the will to survive as the ultimate foundation of the
        struggle toward perfection, the yearning to learn and grow and
        increase in level of being (or, if you will, to progress along
        Teilhard's Great Chain of Being), it is easier to understand Felice's
        catastrophic choice after she is cured of her inability to think
        rationally. She has chosen the only relation to the world that she
        believes will allow her to survive without loss of identity: Know
        your enemies and endure until you can conquer, seek the negative bond
        and pursue it to the end.
        >
        > We can't really know what the Victor-Fury was capable of during
        the long years of his coma, any more than we can be sure of the level
        of consciousness of anyone in a coma, but we are told plainly enough
        that the Denis-Fury reaches out to enslave the minds of unborn
        Remillard young, the eventual Hydra children, during that final
        gathering while Denis is fully conscious, even though Denis has no
        conscious awareness of this act. In sealing off the Fury-being, the
        sum of his unacceptably hostile and irrationally fearful impulses,
        Denis has rendered himself virtually incapable of controlling the
        Fury once he is forced into full realization of it by the misguided
        metaconcert. Fury holds almost all the weapons, including the
        exercise of Denis's formidable metapsychic powers, and he can begin
        to shape his little army of golems from living Remillard flesh,
        rewarding them with the same horrors Victor came to crave because he
        came to associate them with nurturing sustenance: sexual abuse,
        > murderous subsumption of psychic energies, and power over others
        based in amoral exercise of natural talents, and the freedom of
        action based in total disregard of the harm they might do to other
        human beings.
        >
        > There is no reason to assume, given the growing occurrence of
        sentient consciousness in utero among Remillard young of this era,
        that this is the Fury entity's first such contact, and we know that
        he continues for many years afterwards pitching his dark
        plans for galactic domination to Marc, this supreme young family
        talent, during his sleeping hours, playing on sexual weaknesses as
        well as the will to power. (And no wonder the adult Marc abstains
        from sexual contact much of the time, fearing it will drain the
        strength he needs for his work. It drains his will to resist Fury
        during his dreams even as an adult paramount metapsychic, never mind
        that he associates this consciously with the negative role model
        presented by his promiscuous absentee father.) Still, Marc does
        resist this voice, and his resistance implies a recognition of
        threat – why else would an infant mind resist? – and here we come to
        the prenatal presence of Matthieu. We don't know that Marc understands
        > the concept "brother" at this point, or that he loves or hates
        this other living entity sharing the only world he really knows, but
        the occasional intrusions of Fury must mean that he has identified a
        questionable Other unlike the loving mother that surrounds and
        sustains him. We also know, from the perspective of hindsight, that
        his prenatal mind, at least, was not nearly as strong as Jack's – and
        even the infant Jack, who could defend himself with mental powers
        developed to fantastic level from Fury's attempt to murder him,
        required years more of learning how to relate to those around him.
        >
        > While Marc may actually have physically killed his brother by
        strangling him, as May's story goes, it is doubtful that it could
        have involved anything more than a confused self defense carried out
        in dimly vague awareness, an attempt to fend off the discomfiting
        Other – and it may well be nothing more than accident for which Marc
        later assumes a false guilt.
        >
        > Marc's character is not ever one given to hostile rages, with
        perhaps the single exception of his punishment of Hagen in the Exile
        fishing incident. It is a well-known psychological pattern of young
        children to assume guilt for death or catastrophic harm to those
        around them, in order to gain a (false) sense of control over a
        personal world run amok for no reason – guilt by way of magical
        powers: Dad must have fallen off that ladder and broken all those
        bones because I was so mad at him I wished he would just go away/have
        to suffer too/die. We have already entered the post-Intervention era
        in which in utero communication is possible, and those magical powers
        are a growing reality, but the real beginning of Marc's
        transformation into a cold-blooded theoretician and self-elected
        savior capable of both fratricide and mass murder awaits the birth of
        his beloved Baby Jack.
        >
        > The adolescent Marc thwarts the authority of his father and the
        Milieu to aid the flight of the pregnant Teresa as an act of
        protective love, not as an act of rebellion. And even though he
        blames his father's rather callous indifference, in large part, for
        the later death of the grieving Teresa, Paul remains chiefly an
        inconvenient roadblock, not a hated deadly enemy. What breaks Marc's
        young heart and diverts him from his destiny as a natural leader of
        the new human order and the Galactic Milieu is his inevitable failure
        to rescue Jack from the terrible genetically programmed deterioration
        that will rob him of most biological aspects of his humanity,
        especially his ability to reproduce and pass along to posterity his
        superior genetic heritage, or even to protect him from Fury's attempt
        to destroy him. But Jack has had time to identify the enemy and learn
        a highly effective defense that harms no one, and even covers the
        naked brain of his final form in a human shape he spins from
        > ordinary materials that allows him to relate to others as a normal
        boy.
        >
        > Miraculous powers, indeed, and at a level that we can begin to
        identify as a real evolutionary jump, rather than a revelation of
        powers that have lain dormant in humans for untold ages – although
        Marc's "immortality" gene is a much clearer sign of evolutionary
        change. Marc is relatively secure in his own powers, in his whole
        handsome, strong, charismatic presence, his superior sportsmanship
        and his natural place as an intellectual prodigy, Paramount Grand
        Master metapsychic, and a natural leader. He recognizes Jack as a
        superior mental and spiritual being without jealousy or resentment.
        To Marc, Jack is the true homo superior, free of the limiting
        physical aspects of the human animal.
        >
        > It is here that Marc's belief in Mental Man is born, perhaps in
        part due to the repeated persuasions of the Fury who speaks to him in
        dreams, and with it his determination to duplicate the near-bodiless
        biological framework. Jack, who has long accepted his real nature as
        an evolutionary dead end, despite nurturing every bit of humanity in
        himself than he can identify and master, is horrified when he
        realizes what his brother is doing. The Fury entity, which has by
        now assumed its own full demonic persona in relating to the
        Remillards, complete with the Hydra cadre, observes Marc's total
        commitment to the development of Mental Man with triumphant delight,
        because he believes he can assume ultimate control of these superior
        beings, and with it galactic domination and a position in which no
        harm can touch him. He can reign, he thinks, unchallenged and with
        his twisted and incomplete identity intact, as the eternal, inimical
        Other, feeding on the entire sum of sentient beings in the
        > Galaxy. He cannot win, of course, as Unifex calmly tells him. And
        we see the real counter to Fury in Aiken Drum, who commits a few
        similar horrors along the way, but can be cleansed of their
        contaminating results, because he has taken his place as natural
        leader of his own kind, no longer the defiant Other.
        >
        > Marc has finally challenged the gods, indeed, and will persist to
        the point of final condemnation within the Galactic Milieu, risking
        not only his own destruction and that of the Rebels he has agreed to
        lead, but the ejection of humanity from Milieu membership with a
        permanent sentence of planetary house arrest. Mark has become leader
        of the Rebels, though, less out of conviction than of recognition
        that his best talents for the Mental Man project will become lost to
        him otherwise, and he is already in trouble with the Milieu on
        development of his cerebroenergetic enhancers.
        >
        > Before they and Paul are vaporized by Marc's weapons in the
        final Milieu conflict at Okanagon, Jack and Diamond redeem their
        suspect race with a metaconcert of their own, bringing humanity and
        the other Milieu races into a total harmonic Unity. Only Marc and his
        cerametal-clad Rebel cohorts remain outside their state of grace,
        reducing the population of Okanagon to a cinder, and almost
        completely destroyed themselves by a refraction of their own
        firepower.
        >
        > Mark and his closest followers will escape, aided by Unifex,
        into Pliocene Exile, taking their children with them, and isolating
        themselves from the troubled collection of humanity they find there.
        Fury and the Hydra children have been destroyed, the Remillard clan
        finally healed of guilt and fear, and even Unifex will pass into
        another dimension, having completed his own mission. It is up to
        Mark, now, to learn the meaning of his own humanity, and begin his
        last, long journey toward redemption.
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