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Y-DNA from the Annandale Johnstone Line

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  • George J
    I believe I ve asked this before and unfortunately I ve lost my notes on whatever we discussed. It s my understanding that many AU Johnson/Johntones are
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 4, 2011
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      I believe I've asked this before and unfortunately I've lost my notes on whatever we discussed.

      It's my understanding that many AU Johnson/Johntones are descended from

      "One of the most colorful of the Johnstones of that era was George Johnstone, who was born in Annandale. At age 17 he fought in the Battle of Bunker Hill in 1775. Then at age 22, when he was on a ship in route to Australia, he met a beautiful 16 year-old Jewish girl, Esther Abrahams, who was being transported to Australia because she had stolen a piece of lace valued at 50 shillings. That meeting was the beginning of a love affair that was to last their lifetime. In Australia, the couple were to prosper. George was to become Lt. Governor of the New South Wales colony and the two were to own a large estate named Annandale, after George's birthplace. Additionally, Esther was to become a founding member of the Great Synagogue of Sydney."

      I'm wondering if there has been any Y-DNA testing done from this line and if say what is the Haplogroup?

      Hope you don't mind me asking... again!

      Cheers!
    • Tricia Barnett
      INFO: Clan/Family Histories - Johnston/Johnstone There were a number of John s towns in Scotland but the earliest record of the surname is a John Johnstone
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 5, 2011
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        INFO:

        "Clan/Family Histories
        - Johnston/Johnstone

        There were a number of "John's towns" in Scotland but the earliest record of the surname is a John Johnstone at the end of the 12th century Later, Sir John Johnston of Dumfries signed the Ragman Roll</> in 1296, along with most of the other Scottish landowners, swearing allegiance to King Edward I</>. The family grew in stature and Sir John's descendants were appointed as a warden of the western marches in 1381. Adam Johnstone was named Laird of Johnstone near the beginning of the 15th century and took part in the Battle of Sark in 1448. Adam's son assisted King James II in his struggle with the Douglas</> family and was rewarded with land near Threave Castle</> which had previously belonged to the Douglases. Adam's eldest son (another John) was the ancestor of the Annandale branch of the family while another son Mathew is said to have married a daughter of the Earl of Angus (chief of the Red Douglases) and his descendants formed the Westerhall branch.

        The Johnstones were one of the many Border families who frequently raided the north of England over the centuries. They also became involved in one of the many Border feuds with the Maxwells, which was only resolved by the intervention of King James VI</> in 1623.

        James Johnstone, the chief of the clan, was made Lord Johnstone of Lochwood in 1633 by King Charles I</> and Earl of Hartfell in 1643. King Charles II</> elevated him to Earl of Annandale, and Lord Johnstone of Lochwood, Lochmaben, Moffatdale and Evandal. In 1701, a descendant was raised to the rank of Marquess of Annandale.

        In early times, the city of Perth</> was called St John's Toun (the local football team is still called St Johnstone) and when surnames became more frequent, many of the people from there took the name Johnstone. When the MacGregor name was proscribed (banned) a number of that clan took the name Johnstone.

        Other Johnstones are to be found in Strathspey, unconnected with those in the Borders. This family supported the Jacobite cause in 1715 and 1745. The head of this branch now lives in America.

        In more modern times, Tom Johnston, a Labour politician, was a successful Secretary of State for Scotland during the Second World War.

        The Johnston clan motto is "Nunquam non paratus" which means "Never unprepared".

        Johnston/Johnstone combined was the 10th most frequent surname at the General Register Office</> in 1995. "

         

        George ,

        What is your y-dna group .

        I would be interested in hearing about any y-dna results for JOHNSTON.

        It is not my paternal line but my g grandfather was a JOHNSTON - James Johnston 1854-1922 in Wick Caithness Scotland

        Earliest I can prove his family is in East Lothian Scotland 1731.   So before that

         

        Interestingly there is a I2b1 from Dumfries Scotland  Christopher Johnstone b c 1776

         

        Tricia


      • G. Johnson
        Hi Tricia, Thank you for your response and the information. My haplogroup is I1* and haplotype is in the I1-ASgeneric (Ken Nordvedt s tables). I have a very
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 5, 2011
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          Hi Tricia,
           
          Thank you for your response and the information.
           
          My haplogroup is I1*  and haplotype is in the I1-ASgeneric (Ken Nordvedt's tables).
           
          I have a very close Y-DNA match (66/67 markers) to a group who has stated that they are descended from Gilbert Johnston - William Johnston - Hugh Johnston (SC circa 1750-80).  In my earlier findings I thought I ran into a group here with the same lineage but with the haplogroup of R1b.  
           
          I'm trying to piece some of my notes back together and get more information if any has been found over the course of the year when I first asked.
           
          Chat soon
          Cheers
          George


           
          On Sat, Feb 5, 2011 at 3:21 AM, Tricia Barnett <tricia.barnett@...> wrote:
           

          INFO:

          "Clan/Family Histories
          - Johnston/Johnstone

          There were a number of "John's towns" in Scotland but the earliest record of the surname is a John Johnstone at the end of the 12th century Later, Sir John Johnston of Dumfries signed the Ragman Roll in 1296, along with most of the other Scottish landowners, swearing allegiance to King Edward I. The family grew in stature and Sir John's descendants were appointed as a warden of the western marches in 1381. Adam Johnstone was named Laird of Johnstone near the beginning of the 15th century and took part in the Battle of Sark in 1448. Adam's son assisted King James II in his struggle with the Douglas family and was rewarded with land near Threave Castle which had previously belonged to the Douglases. Adam's eldest son (another John) was the ancestor of the Annandale branch of the family while another son Mathew is said to have married a daughter of the Earl of Angus (chief of the Red Douglases) and his descendants formed the Westerhall branch.

          The Johnstones were one of the many Border families who frequently raided the north of England over the centuries. They also became involved in one of the many Border feuds with the Maxwells, which was only resolved by the intervention of King James VI in 1623.

          James Johnstone, the chief of the clan, was made Lord Johnstone of Lochwood in 1633 by King Charles I and Earl of Hartfell in 1643. King Charles II elevated him to Earl of Annandale, and Lord Johnstone of Lochwood, Lochmaben, Moffatdale and Evandal. In 1701, a descendant was raised to the rank of Marquess of Annandale.

          In early times, the city of Perth was called St John's Toun (the local football team is still called St Johnstone) and when surnames became more frequent, many of the people from there took the name Johnstone. When the MacGregor name was proscribed (banned) a number of that clan took the name Johnstone.

          Other Johnstones are to be found in Strathspey, unconnected with those in the Borders. This family supported the Jacobite cause in 1715 and 1745. The head of this branch now lives in America.

          In more modern times, Tom Johnston, a Labour politician, was a successful Secretary of State for Scotland during the Second World War.

          The Johnston clan motto is "Nunquam non paratus" which means "Never unprepared".

          Johnston/Johnstone combined was the 10th most frequent surname at the General Register Office in 1995. "

           

          George ,

          What is your y-dna group .

          I would be interested in hearing about any y-dna results for JOHNSTON.

          It is not my paternal line but my g grandfather was a JOHNSTON - James Johnston 1854-1922 in Wick Caithness Scotland

          Earliest I can prove his family is in East Lothian Scotland 1731.   So before that

           

          Interestingly there is a I2b1 from Dumfries Scotland  Christopher Johnstone b c 1776

           

          Tricia



        • Basil Johnston
          From time to time I ve been reading of the Johnstons of Scotland, but no mention has ever been related to the Johnstons of Islay who were prominent whiskey
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 13, 2011
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            From time to time I've been reading of the Johnstons of Scotland, but no mention has ever been related to the Johnstons of Islay who were prominent whiskey distillers. Now I know that there are many Johnstons from this line in Australia. Can anyone put some light on this subject.
             
            Regards
            Basil Johnston
            South Africa


            From: Tricia Barnett <tricia.barnett@...>
            To: JohnstonAustralia@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sat, February 5, 2011 1:21:15 PM
            Subject: Re: [JohnstonAustralia] Y-DNA from the Annandale Johnstone Line

             

            INFO:

            "Clan/Family Histories
            - Johnston/Johnstone

            There were a number of "John's towns" in Scotland but the earliest record of the surname is a John Johnstone at the end of the 12th century Later, Sir John Johnston of Dumfries signed the Ragman Roll</> in 1296, along with most of the other Scottish landowners, swearing allegiance to King Edward I</>. The family grew in stature and Sir John's descendants were appointed as a warden of the western marches in 1381. Adam Johnstone was named Laird of Johnstone near the beginning of the 15th century and took part in the Battle of Sark in 1448. Adam's son assisted King James II in his struggle with the Douglas</> family and was rewarded with land near Threave Castle</> which had previously belonged to the Douglases. Adam's eldest son (another John) was the ancestor of the Annandale branch of the family while another son Mathew is said to have married a daughter of the Earl of Angus (chief of the Red Douglases) and his descendants formed the Westerhall branch.

            The Johnstones were one of the many Border families who frequently raided the north of England over the centuries. They also became involved in one of the many Border feuds with the Maxwells, which was only resolved by the intervention of King James VI</> in 1623.

            James Johnstone, the chief of the clan, was made Lord Johnstone of Lochwood in 1633 by King Charles I</> and Earl of Hartfell in 1643. King Charles II</> elevated him to Earl of Annandale, and Lord Johnstone of Lochwood, Lochmaben, Moffatdale and Evandal. In 1701, a descendant was raised to the rank of Marquess of Annandale.

            In early times, the city of Perth</> was called St John's Toun (the local football team is still called St Johnstone) and when surnames became more frequent, many of the people from there took the name Johnstone. When the MacGregor name was proscribed (banned) a number of that clan took the name Johnstone.

            Other Johnstones are to be found in Strathspey, unconnected with those in the Borders. This family supported the Jacobite cause in 1715 and 1745. The head of this branch now lives in America.

            In more modern times, Tom Johnston, a Labour politician, was a successful Secretary of State for Scotland during the Second World War.

            The Johnston clan motto is "Nunquam non paratus" which means "Never unprepared".

            Johnston/Johnstone combined was the 10th most frequent surname at the General Register Office</> in 1995. "

             

            George ,

            What is your y-dna group .

            I would be interested in hearing about any y-dna results for JOHNSTON.

            It is not my paternal line but my g grandfather was a JOHNSTON - James Johnston 1854-1922 in Wick Caithness Scotland

            Earliest I can prove his family is in East Lothian Scotland 1731.   So before that

             

            Interestingly there is a I2b1 from Dumfries Scotland  Christopher Johnstone b c 1776

             

            Tricia




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          • Islay Kelly
            I have Johnston from Islay in my family line but they were from Soll/Tiree and earlier, I believe from Ardnamurchan. My gtrrat great grandfather Alan Johnston
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 13, 2011
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              I have Johnston from Islay in my family line but they were from Soll/Tiree and earlier, I believe from Ardnamurchan.  My gtrrat great grandfather Alan Johnston migrated firstly to Tasmania in 1857 but moved to the Partland district in Victoria later. Anyone with further information ?
               
               
              Islay Kelly
              Western Australia
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Sunday, February 13, 2011 6:07 PM
              Subject: Re: [JohnstonAustralia] of Islay, Scotland.

               

              From time to time I've been reading of the Johnstons of Scotland, but no mention has ever been related to the Johnstons of Islay who were prominent whiskey distillers. Now I know that there are many Johnstons from this line in Australia. Can anyone put some light on this subject.
               
              Regards
              Basil Johnston
              South Africa


              From: Tricia Barnett <tricia.barnett@...>
              To: JohnstonAustralia@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sat, February 5, 2011 1:21:15 PM
              Subject: Re: [JohnstonAustralia] Y-DNA from the Annandale Johnstone Line

               

              INFO:

              "Clan/Family Histories
              - Johnston/Johnstone

              There were a number of "John's towns" in Scotland but the earliest record of the surname is a John Johnstone at the end of the 12th century Later, Sir John Johnston of Dumfries signed the Ragman Roll</> in 1296, along with most of the other Scottish landowners, swearing allegiance to King Edward I</>. The family grew in stature and Sir John's descendants were appointed as a warden of the western marches in 1381. Adam Johnstone was named Laird of Johnstone near the beginning of the 15th century and took part in the Battle of Sark in 1448. Adam's son assisted King James II in his struggle with the Douglas</> family and was rewarded with land near Threave Castle</> which had previously belonged to the Douglases. Adam's eldest son (another John) was the ancestor of the Annandale branch of the family while another son Mathew is said to have married a daughter of the Earl of Angus (chief of the Red Douglases) and his descendants formed the Westerhall branch.

              The Johnstones were one of the many Border families who frequently raided the north of England over the centuries. They also became involved in one of the many Border feuds with the Maxwells, which was only resolved by the intervention of King James VI</> in 1623.

              James Johnstone, the chief of the clan, was made Lord Johnstone of Lochwood in 1633 by King Charles I</> and Earl of Hartfell in 1643. King Charles II</> elevated him to Earl of Annandale, and Lord Johnstone of Lochwood, Lochmaben, Moffatdale and Evandal. In 1701, a descendant was raised to the rank of Marquess of Annandale.

              In early times, the city of Perth</> was called St John's Toun (the local football team is still called St Johnstone) and when surnames became more frequent, many of the people from there took the name Johnstone. When the MacGregor name was proscribed (banned) a number of that clan took the name Johnstone.

              Other Johnstones are to be found in Strathspey, unconnected with those in the Borders. This family supported the Jacobite cause in 1715 and 1745. The head of this branch now lives in America.

              In more modern times, Tom Johnston, a Labour politician, was a successful Secretary of State for Scotland during the Second World War.

              The Johnston clan motto is "Nunquam non paratus" which means "Never unprepared".

              Johnston/Johnstone combined was the 10th most frequent surname at the General Register Office</> in 1995. "

               

              George ,

              What is your y-dna group .

              I would be interested in hearing about any y-dna results for JOHNSTON.

              It is not my paternal line but my g grandfather was a JOHNSTON - James Johnston 1854-1922 in Wick Caithness Scotland

              Earliest I can prove his family is in East Lothian Scotland 1731.   So before that

               

              Interestingly there is a I2b1 from Dumfries Scotland  Christopher Johnstone b c 1776

               

              Tricia




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