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884Re: [JewishKeidan] Rooted in Keidan

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  • Laimukas
    Apr 8 8:39 PM
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      Dear All,

      I understand your point and can compare your pain with the pain of my mother's family experience,
      as they were sent to the Siberia for ten years. Although, I understand it is not the same too.

      As being an educator from the bottom of my heart I feel I have to speak about the past with my students.
      That is why we have lessons, projects, discussions, meetings. That is why we learn together with our students to be tolerant.It is not a secret that it is not always easy. But we are trying to do our best.
      Thank you for helping me to do this.

      Continuing our project I have started the presentation about Education in Keidan. As you shared some photos of "Tarbut" school and Kedainiai gymnasium I have added them here: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1qVwUxwSOQs8ZSvtUzw23p9ozuagWV6P3efNeave2Y1g/edit?usp=sharing 

      You are welcome  to add more photos on the topic.You can edit yourself in this presentation.

      I am looking forward to hearing from you.

      All the best,
      Laima


       
      "Honesty and frankness make you vulnerable.
      Be honest and frank anyway."
      On Monday, 7 April 2014, 22:47, Howard Wolinsky <howard.wolinsky@...> wrote:
       

      Olga made some excellent points.
      Perhaps Laima can share this letter with her students and put it up on the website.
      Privately, I asked a related, more indirect question: How many Jews are in Keidan now? How diverse is the population now? (I think there is only one family that claims a Jewish ancestor.)
      My point to the teacher and students was: What happened to the Jews who once called Keidan home? They all didn't live happily ever after in the USA, Israel, South Africa.
      It's important that these students know the whole story.
      Howard Wolinsky


      On Sun, Apr 6, 2014 at 1:17 PM, Olga Zabludoff <ozabludoff@...> wrote:
       
      Dear Laima,
       
      I’m sorry that I do not have photos of the Tarbut school in Keidan.
      You mention below that you are interested in hearing my “story.”  It is not a story I wish to tell you but some questions I want to ask, some concerns I would like to explain to you so that you can pass them on to your students.
       
      Many of the Keidan descendants to whom you are reaching out lost their parents,  grandparents, and other family members in the Holocaust. The pain of our loss becomes even more intense because in Lithuania 95 % of the Jewish community was murdered with the willing collaboration of the neighbors of the Jews. Lithuania has the highest rate of Jewish genocide in all of Nazi-occupied Europe, and that was because of the massive participation of the local population. Yes, there were some Righteous Among the Nations, as Alexandre Kaplan points out in her message, and these noble individuals should be honoured and their memories cherished. But why is it that the Lithuanian government chooses to memorialize Nazi collaborators like Kazys Skirpa, Jonas Noreika and Juozas Ambrazevicius-Brazaitis  with streets, schools  and university lecture halls named for them? Why are there no streets named after Righteous Among the Nations?
       
      As an educator I’m sure you know that history must be truthful and complete. For example, when our democratic development is taught in the United States, we include the pain inflicted on native Americans and Blacks. You are teaching about the cultures and diversity of Lithuania, but do your students know the full World War II history of their country?  Litvaks around the globe do not hold the present generations of Lithuanians responsible for what their grandparents did to the Jews, but unless  the youth of Lithuania are taught the truth, no real lessons will be learned.
       
      Best regards,
       
      Olga
       
      ________
       
      Dear Olga,
       
      You ask if I am interested in hearing your story. Sure, Olga. I think every single story is worth learning. You are a part of the history of the location I live now. I am very interested in such stories.
      You wrote ". Aharonas was the principal of the Tarbut School in Keidan (a school for Hebrew education)."
       
      Maybe you have some more photos from that school?
       
      Laima 
      ___________
      Dear Laima,
       
      I live in Washington, DC in the US.
      I have visited Keidan twice and have been to Lithuania three times for extended visits.
      My uncle was Aharonas Poricas (Aaron Poritz). He was my father’s brother. I am attaching a photo of the family taken while they were living in Kedainiai in 1940. A year later they were all murdered.
       
      I admire that you are doing this project on cultural diversity in Kedainiai, but at the same time I have some questions for you as an educator. Are you interested in hearing my concerns if I speak freely?
       
      Best regards,
       
      Olga
       
       



      --
      Howard Wolinsky

      708-799-0635 (landline)
      312-909-2381 (mobile)
      howardwolinsky (Skype)


      --
      Howard Wolinsky

      708-799-0635 (landline)
      312-909-2381 (mobile)
      howardwolinsky (Skype)



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