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Blasts and the BJP

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  • Sukla Sen
    http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/?page=2008 08 01 story_1-8-2008_pg3_5 *Blasts and the BJP* * J Sri Raman* *Advani has opted to use the blast as yet another
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 1, 2008
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      http://www.dailytimes.com.pk/?page=2008\08\01\story_1-8-2008_pg3_5

      Blasts and the BJP

      J Sri Raman


      Advani has opted to use the blast as yet another argument for a tougher law against terrorism — or for revival of the rights-denying Prevention of Terrorism Act (POTA)

      It is no mystery what the blasts of July 26 in Ahmedabad (immediately in the wake of explosions in Bangalore) meant for the common people of India. Television images of the outrage, which claimed a toll of 49 lives, illustrated a terrorism that was at once absurd and inhuman in its choice of targets. We need not speculate over the popular response to the sight of scattered bodies, sobbing women and the broken and plastered limbs of children in hospital beds.

      What the blasts mean for the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), however, has indeed become a matter of some serious speculation. The party and its parivar (the Far Right "family") cannot blame this on bilious enemy propaganda for it is the contradictory voices emanating from within the BJP that have roused curiosity and raised questions.

      The first reaction linking the blasts in both the cities to the BJP came from outside the party. B Raman, a former official of the Research and Analysis Wing (RAW), the Indian counterpart of Pakistan's in-the-news Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), found it "striking" that both the blasts had taken place in BJP-ruled States. The party is proud of having made a breakthrough in south India, until recently considered out of bounds for it, by capturing power in Bangalore, the software-strong capital of Karnataka. And Ahmedabad, of course, is the seat of Narendra Modi's power, and the capital of Gujarat, the laboratory of "cultural nationalism" that witnessed the grisly pogrom of 2002.

      Raman found the circumstance so striking that he even talked of the BJP-ruled state of Madhya Pradesh as the next likely target of terrorists. No blasts have yet shaken Bhopal, the capital of MP. But that is not the only reason why the ex-RAW expert seemed to be more than somewhat selective in the matter.

      Congress Chief Ministers were at the helm in Maharashtra, both during the series of 13 bombings that shocked Mumbai in March 1993 and the train blasts in the same metropolis in July 2006. No expert ever perceived any party-political significance in the fact. Mayawati Kumkari Naina of the Bahujan Samaj Party was the Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh in November 2007, when blasts shook Varanasi, Lucknow and Faizabad in the politically crucial state.

      Moving south, Karnataka had no BJP Chief Minister when the Indian Institute of Science was attacked in Bangalore in December 2005. Nor had Andhra Pradesh one, when Hyderabad shook with blasts in August 2007. And the BJP had never more than a negligible political presence in Tamilnadu, which witnessed its worst blasts in Coimbatore way back in 1998.

      The Bangalore-Ahmedabad bombings, however, seemed, at least to a section in the BJP, to promise a bonanza of sympathy for the party, as it prepares for assembly polls in some states and, more importantly, the general election in 2009. Predictably and particularly, Modi is out to make the most of the situation.

      "It is a war on India", he declared, humility stopping him from describing it as a war on himself. The message, however, has not been lost on the media. Modi, as the no-nonsense answer of the nation to terrorism, encounters one in every newspaper and channel. Particularly endearing and potentially enduring is the image of the leader patting the police on the back in the diamond city of Surat for suddenly discovering all of twenty unexploded bombs in public places, including one precariously perched in the cleft of a tree.

      The first voice of dissent within the party and the "family" came from no less a leader than Lal Krishna Advani. The Shadow Prime Minister was shrewd enough to see the dangers of the claim that the BJP-ruled states were the targets of successful strikes by a diabolical terrorism.

      Here he was, protecting himself as the Iron Man of India and his party as the scourge of terrorists. He has been at his oratorical best, assailing Congress and its coalition government for cravenly surrendering to terrorism. The controversy over his own role as No 2 in the Atal Bihari Vajpayee regime during a high-profile hijack case, with even his party colleagues questioning his version, may have mellowed someone made of less stern stuff.

      He, however, has persisted in making a promise of better anti-terrorist action a major part the BJP's poll platform. He has no reason to share the others' excitement over the opportunity of a sympathy vote they espy in the serial blasts. He had good reason, thus, to reject the suggestion from Raman, supported by other party leaders and media luminaries.

      Some observers also see no reason for him to rejoice over such sympathy strengthening Modi further. Advani, elected to the Lok Sabha (the lower house of India's parliament), has always championed the larger-than-life Chief Minister's cause in the party and outside. But, Advani has left no doubt that he is the Prime Minister-in-waiting, while Modi and his admirers have never concealed his prime-ministerial ambitions.

      Advani has, instead, opted to use the blast as yet another argument for a tougher law against terrorism — or for revival of the rights-denying Prevention of Terrorism Act (POTA), rejected by the people in the general election of 2004 and therefore removed from the statute book. The people, who lived through the blasts the POTA could not prevent, may not exactly be looking forward to its re-enactment. But Advani knows they will look forward even less to rule buy the BJP, if it spells more blasts.

      Meanwhile, a woman BJP leader, well known for a warped political campaign that perhaps made Manmohan Singh the Prime Minister, has come out with the most curious theory on the blasts.

      Sushma Swaraj came into limelight in 1999 when she contested a by-election against Congress president Sonia Gandhi and lost. The former Information and Broadcasting Minister, however, got even greater media attention in 2004, when she put up a very BJP-like opposition to "foreigner" Sonia becoming the Prime Minister. Sushma threatened to cut her tresses, wear a white sari and start living on peanuts (like a traditional widow), if the "national humiliation" was not averted. It was and, mercifully, we were all spared the visual and other consequences of the vow.

      Barging into the debate over the blasts with characteristic belligerence, she has called them a "conspiracy" by Congress and the government in New Delhi. The motive, according to her, was to divert public attention away from the "cash-for-votes" controversy raised during the confidence vote sought and won by the Manmohan Singh government.

      Many, in fact, suspect another conspiracy, by which the BJP let the government win the vote (sought mainly on the US-India nuclear deal, to which the party never had a serious objection) but also allowed some of its members of parliament to flaunt on the floor of the House wads of currency allegedly given as bribes in a show of opposition.

      Swaraj's theory was, clearly, at variance with the take of either Modi or Advani. Yet, she has reiterated that she sticks to the stand, without receiving any party reprimand so far. Veteran BJP-watchers see this as another instance of the party and the parivar deciding to speak with different voices on difficult issues.

      Pity the BJP. The blasts, which spell only terrible suffering for the ordinary citizen, pose so many tricky, tactical questions for the poor party.

      The writer is a journalist based in Chennai, India. A peace activist, he is also the author of a sheaf of poems titled 'At Gunpoint'
    • Balbir Singh Sooch
      Is there further need to investigate the truth of terrorism in India in face of bold disclosure by Sushma Swaraj? Balbir singh Sooch, Advocate, Ludhiana
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 1, 2008
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        Is there further need to investigate the truth of terrorism in India in face of bold disclosure by Sushma Swaraj?

         

        Balbir singh Sooch, Advocate, Ludhiana

        Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) spokesman and former minister Sushma Swaraj in a news conference in New Delhi on Monday (28 July)  has accused the government of being connected with the bomb attacks in Bangalore and Ahmedabad. It is like she brought the truth boldly of the history of terrorism in India.

        Ms Sushma Swaraj is backbone of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) and actively associated with the non-Congress governments of past and personally very well does know and understand the way with the help of the agencies, the inner politics functioning in India. That’s untold story the country is being ruled by befooling the masses who are lacking in poltical knowledge and mostly backward, illiterate and kept falsely united in dark in face of unbearable sufferings increasing day by day those suits to the immoral and cruel politicians of India.

         

        The terrorism is a part of the game as clearly and rightly said that the politicians mainly utilize their leisure period conspiringly for creating dissatisfaction and discontentment among masses and to divide people of all communities, sections and groups for diverting the attention of people from their own misdeeds, corrupt practices and all sorts of scandals. About the politics of opportunism, mostly masses are unaware of the politicians untold success story.  Extract from an article: ‘Indian politicians are eggs of the same basket’.

         

        Why to cry so much if Ms Sushma Swaraj did boldly disclose the truth? And also said “I am not making off-the-cuff remarks," Swaraj emphasised. "I have said what I wanted; it is for you to interpret.” For Ms Sushma Swaraj, the inner politics of the terrorism as witnessed by her closely in the past is only  for votes in India.

        To my mind, it does not amount to levelling serious allegations against anyone as it is nothing but only truth of politics functioning in India dsclosed so boldly by Ms Sushma Swaraj.

        01 August 2008 10:45AM (Already emailed)

        www.sikhvicharmanch.com




        To: mediainitiative@...; Mahajanapada@yahoogroups.com; Bahujan@yahoogroups.com; india-unity@yahoogroups.com; india-force@yahoogroups.com; ihro@yahoogroups.com; issuesonline_worldwide@yahoogroups.com; arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com
        From: sukla.sen@...
        Date: Fri, 1 Aug 2008 12:59:22 +0530
        Subject: [India-Force] Blasts and the BJP

        http://www.dailytim es.com.pk/ ?page=2008\ 08\01\story_ 1-8-2008_ pg3_5

        Blasts and the BJP

        J Sri Raman


        Advani has opted to use the blast as yet another argument for a tougher law against terrorism — or for revival of the rights-denying Prevention of Terrorism Act (POTA)

        It is no mystery what the blasts of July 26 in Ahmedabad (immediately in the wake of explosions in Bangalore) meant for the common people of India. Television images of the outrage, which claimed a toll of 49 lives, illustrated a terrorism that was at once absurd and inhuman in its choice of targets. We need not speculate over the popular response to the sight of scattered bodies, sobbing women and the broken and plastered limbs of children in hospital beds.

        What the blasts mean for the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), however, has indeed become a matter of some serious speculation. The party and its parivar (the Far Right "family") cannot blame this on bilious enemy propaganda for it is the contradictory voices emanating from within the BJP that have roused curiosity and raised questions.

        The first reaction linking the blasts in both the cities to the BJP came from outside the party. B Raman, a former official of the Research and Analysis Wing (RAW), the Indian counterpart of Pakistan's in-the-news Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), found it "striking" that both the blasts had taken place in BJP-ruled States. The party is proud of having made a breakthrough in south India, until recently considered out of bounds for it, by capturing power in Bangalore, the software-strong capital of Karnataka. And Ahmedabad, of course, is the seat of Narendra Modi's power, and the capital of Gujarat, the laboratory of "cultural nationalism" that witnessed the grisly pogrom of 2002.

        Raman found the circumstance so striking that he even talked of the BJP-ruled state of Madhya Pradesh as the next likely target of terrorists. No blasts have yet shaken Bhopal, the capital of MP. But that is not the only reason why the ex-RAW expert seemed to be more than somewhat selective in the matter.

        Congress Chief Ministers were at the helm in Maharashtra, both during the series of 13 bombings that shocked Mumbai in March 1993 and the train blasts in the same metropolis in July 2006. No expert ever perceived any party-political significance in the fact. Mayawati Kumkari Naina of the Bahujan Samaj Party was the Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh in November 2007, when blasts shook Varanasi, Lucknow and Faizabad in the politically crucial state.

        Moving south, Karnataka had no BJP Chief Minister when the Indian Institute of Science was attacked in Bangalore in December 2005. Nor had Andhra Pradesh one, when Hyderabad shook with blasts in August 2007. And the BJP had never more than a negligible political presence in Tamilnadu, which witnessed its worst blasts in Coimbatore way back in 1998.

        The Bangalore-Ahmedabad bombings, however, seemed, at least to a section in the BJP, to promise a bonanza of sympathy for the party, as it prepares for assembly polls in some states and, more importantly, the general election in 2009. Predictably and particularly, Modi is out to make the most of the situation.

        "It is a war on India", he declared, humility stopping him from describing it as a war on himself. The message, however, has not been lost on the media. Modi, as the no-nonsense answer of the nation to terrorism, encounters one in every newspaper and channel. Particularly endearing and potentially enduring is the image of the leader patting the police on the back in the diamond city of Surat for suddenly discovering all of twenty unexploded bombs in public places, including one precariously perched in the cleft of a tree.

        The first voice of dissent within the party and the "family" came from no less a leader than Lal Krishna Advani. The Shadow Prime Minister was shrewd enough to see the dangers of the claim that the BJP-ruled states were the targets of successful strikes by a diabolical terrorism.

        Here he was, protecting himself as the Iron Man of India and his party as the scourge of terrorists. He has been at his oratorical best, assailing Congress and its coalition government for cravenly surrendering to terrorism. The controversy over his own role as No 2 in the Atal Bihari Vajpayee regime during a high-profile hijack case, with even his party colleagues questioning his version, may have mellowed someone made of less stern stuff.

        He, however, has persisted in making a promise of better anti-terrorist action a major part the BJP's poll platform. He has no reason to share the others' excitement over the opportunity of a sympathy vote they espy in the serial blasts. He had good reason, thus, to reject the suggestion from Raman, supported by other party leaders and media luminaries.

        Some observers also see no reason for him to rejoice over such sympathy strengthening Modi further. Advani, elected to the Lok Sabha (the lower house of India's parliament), has always championed the larger-than- life Chief Minister's cause in the party and outside. But, Advani has left no doubt that he is the Prime Minister-in- waiting, while Modi and his admirers have never concealed his prime-ministerial ambitions.

        Advani has, instead, opted to use the blast as yet another argument for a tougher law against terrorism — or for revival of the rights-denying Prevention of Terrorism Act (POTA), rejected by the people in the general election of 2004 and therefore removed from the statute book. The people, who lived through the blasts the POTA could not prevent, may not exactly be looking forward to its re-enactment. But Advani knows they will look forward even less to rule buy the BJP, if it spells more blasts.

        Meanwhile, a woman BJP leader, well known for a warped political campaign that perhaps made Manmohan Singh the Prime Minister, has come out with the most curious theory on the blasts.

        Sushma Swaraj came into limelight in 1999 when she contested a by-election against Congress president Sonia Gandhi and lost. The former Information and Broadcasting Minister, however, got even greater media attention in 2004, when she put up a very BJP-like opposition to "foreigner" Sonia becoming the Prime Minister. Sushma threatened to cut her tresses, wear a white sari and start living on peanuts (like a traditional widow), if the "national humiliation" was not averted. It was and, mercifully, we were all spared the visual and other consequences of the vow.

        Barging into the debate over the blasts with characteristic belligerence, she has called them a "conspiracy" by Congress and the government in New Delhi. The motive, according to her, was to divert public attention away from the "cash-for-votes" controversy raised during the confidence vote sought and won by the Manmohan Singh government.

        Many, in fact, suspect another conspiracy, by which the BJP let the government win the vote (sought mainly on the US-India nuclear deal, to which the party never had a serious objection) but also allowed some of its members of parliament to flaunt on the floor of the House wads of currency allegedly given as bribes in a show of opposition.

        Swaraj's theory was, clearly, at variance with the take of either Modi or Advani. Yet, she has reiterated that she sticks to the stand, without receiving any party reprimand so far. Veteran BJP-watchers see this as another instance of the party and the parivar deciding to speak with different voices on difficult issues.

        Pity the BJP. The blasts, which spell only terrible suffering for the ordinary citizen, pose so many tricky, tactical questions for the poor party.

        The writer is a journalist based in Chennai, India. A peace activist, he is also the author of a sheaf of poems titled 'At Gunpoint'




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      • RAMSU
        Let us bluntly face facts & ruthlessly say that Terrorists are basically Muslims and while terrorism in the West is retaliation with revenge, in India, it is
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 1, 2008
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          Let us bluntly face facts & ruthlessly say that Terrorists are basically Muslims and while terrorism in the West is retaliation with revenge, in India, it is the sheer pampering of this community with the vote-bank politics of the successive Congress governments.  And it is tragic that even our Defence services have become tardy & directionless with its ever-increasing budget only contributing to bribes to people & parties enjoying their positions.
           
          We have been losing precious lives in Kashmir everyday  for decades now and does the Central Government have any concrete plan to stop the terrorist-onslaught?  Politicians shed crocodile tears and are wasting time without any time-bound concrete plan to eliminate the gangs causing the thoughtless massacre.
           
          Blame-game between the Central Congress & State Governments has become such a laughing stock for the terrorists that they can strike anywhere in the country with ease & kill people for fun and keep doing it at will.  It is high time that a serious War-Alert is sounded across the country and eliminate the terrorist-outfit-foundations immediately.
           
          RamSu

          Breathe-in Smile and Breathe-out Laughter for the Good Health of Everyone !

          --- On Fri, 1/8/08, Balbir Singh Sooch <sooch50@...> wrote:


          Unlimited freedom, unlimited storage. Get it now
        • Tariq Kalim
          As ususal we will never come to know who was responsible for these blasts. Some facts however can t be ignored:   1. All the explosions took place in BJP
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 1, 2008
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            As ususal we will never come to know who was responsible for these blasts. Some facts however can't be ignored:
             
            1. All the explosions took place in BJP ruled states.
            2. The timing of the explosions had a very strong political tone and motivation.
            3. The third proposed target was Surat again a BJP ruled area.
            4. However all the explosives (almost 20) were located and diffused. Indeed very surprising - have our security agencies become that efficient or were they led by a hidden hand (that had a list giving the location of every explosive) to these explosives.
            5. Could it be that the political purpose was already achieved by the blasts in the first two cities and no need was seen for a third set of blasts.
            6. Our political guardians are capable of anything for their selfish gains. They are as selfish as the masses are stupid.
            7. We know their true colours but still get carried away by their rhetorics.
            8. True there are terrorist outfits present but these politicians are no better. Only difference is that they will never be blamed while on the contrary they always can pin the blame on others and also convince the stupid masses.
             
            It seems we shall continue to suffer or shall we say we deserve to suffer for our STUPIDTY.
             
            God save us
            Tariq Kalim 

            --- On Fri, 1/8/08, Sukla Sen <sukla.sen@...> wrote:
            From: Sukla Sen <sukla.sen@...>
            Subject: [India-Force] Blasts and the BJP
            To: mediainitiative@..., "mahajanapada" <Mahajanapada@yahoogroups.com>, "bahujan" <Bahujan@yahoogroups.com>, "india-unity@yahoogroups.com" <india-unity@yahoogroups.com>, "india-force@yahoogroups.com" <india-force@yahoogroups.com>, "IHRO" <ihro@yahoogroups.com>, "issueonline" <issuesonline_worldwide@yahoogroups.com>, "Wake up India" <arkitectindia@yahoogroups.com>
            Date: Friday, 1 August, 2008, 12:59 PM

            http://www.dailytim es.com.pk/ ?page=2008\ 08\01\story_ 1-8-2008_ pg3_5

            Blasts and the BJP

            J Sri Raman


            Advani has opted to use the blast as yet another argument for a tougher law against terrorism — or for revival of the rights-denying Prevention of Terrorism Act (POTA)

            It is no mystery what the blasts of July 26 in Ahmedabad (immediately in the wake of explosions in Bangalore) meant for the common people of India. Television images of the outrage, which claimed a toll of 49 lives, illustrated a terrorism that was at once absurd and inhuman in its choice of targets. We need not speculate over the popular response to the sight of scattered bodies, sobbing women and the broken and plastered limbs of children in hospital beds.

            What the blasts mean for the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), however, has indeed become a matter of some serious speculation. The party and its parivar (the Far Right "family") cannot blame this on bilious enemy propaganda for it is the contradictory voices emanating from within the BJP that have roused curiosity and raised questions.

            The first reaction linking the blasts in both the cities to the BJP came from outside the party. B Raman, a former official of the Research and Analysis Wing (RAW), the Indian counterpart of Pakistan's in-the-news Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI), found it "striking" that both the blasts had taken place in BJP-ruled States. The party is proud of having made a breakthrough in south India, until recently considered out of bounds for it, by capturing power in Bangalore, the software-strong capital of Karnataka. And Ahmedabad, of course, is the seat of Narendra Modi's power, and the capital of Gujarat, the laboratory of "cultural nationalism" that witnessed the grisly pogrom of 2002.

            Raman found the circumstance so striking that he even talked of the BJP-ruled state of Madhya Pradesh as the next likely target of terrorists. No blasts have yet shaken Bhopal, the capital of MP. But that is not the only reason why the ex-RAW expert seemed to be more than somewhat selective in the matter.

            Congress Chief Ministers were at the helm in Maharashtra, both during the series of 13 bombings that shocked Mumbai in March 1993 and the train blasts in the same metropolis in July 2006. No expert ever perceived any party-political significance in the fact. Mayawati Kumkari Naina of the Bahujan Samaj Party was the Chief Minister of Uttar Pradesh in November 2007, when blasts shook Varanasi, Lucknow and Faizabad in the politically crucial state.

            Moving south, Karnataka had no BJP Chief Minister when the Indian Institute of Science was attacked in Bangalore in December 2005. Nor had Andhra Pradesh one, when Hyderabad shook with blasts in August 2007. And the BJP had never more than a negligible political presence in Tamilnadu, which witnessed its worst blasts in Coimbatore way back in 1998.

            The Bangalore-Ahmedabad bombings, however, seemed, at least to a section in the BJP, to promise a bonanza of sympathy for the party, as it prepares for assembly polls in some states and, more importantly, the general election in 2009. Predictably and particularly, Modi is out to make the most of the situation.

            "It is a war on India", he declared, humility stopping him from describing it as a war on himself. The message, however, has not been lost on the media. Modi, as the no-nonsense answer of the nation to terrorism, encounters one in every newspaper and channel. Particularly endearing and potentially enduring is the image of the leader patting the police on the back in the diamond city of Surat for suddenly discovering all of twenty unexploded bombs in public places, including one precariously perched in the cleft of a tree.

            The first voice of dissent within the party and the "family" came from no less a leader than Lal Krishna Advani. The Shadow Prime Minister was shrewd enough to see the dangers of the claim that the BJP-ruled states were the targets of successful strikes by a diabolical terrorism.

            Here he was, protecting himself as the Iron Man of India and his party as the scourge of terrorists. He has been at his oratorical best, assailing Congress and its coalition government for cravenly surrendering to terrorism. The controversy over his own role as No 2 in the Atal Bihari Vajpayee regime during a high-profile hijack case, with even his party colleagues questioning his version, may have mellowed someone made of less stern stuff.

            He, however, has persisted in making a promise of better anti-terrorist action a major part the BJP's poll platform. He has no reason to share the others' excitement over the opportunity of a sympathy vote they espy in the serial blasts. He had good reason, thus, to reject the suggestion from Raman, supported by other party leaders and media luminaries.

            Some observers also see no reason for him to rejoice over such sympathy strengthening Modi further. Advani, elected to the Lok Sabha (the lower house of India's parliament), has always championed the larger-than- life Chief Minister's cause in the party and outside. But, Advani has left no doubt that he is the Prime Minister-in- waiting, while Modi and his admirers have never concealed his prime-ministerial ambitions.

            Advani has, instead, opted to use the blast as yet another argument for a tougher law against terrorism — or for revival of the rights-denying Prevention of Terrorism Act (POTA), rejected by the people in the general election of 2004 and therefore removed from the statute book. The people, who lived through the blasts the POTA could not prevent, may not exactly be looking forward to its re-enactment. But Advani knows they will look forward even less to rule buy the BJP, if it spells more blasts.

            Meanwhile, a woman BJP leader, well known for a warped political campaign that perhaps made Manmohan Singh the Prime Minister, has come out with the most curious theory on the blasts.

            Sushma Swaraj came into limelight in 1999 when she contested a by-election against Congress president Sonia Gandhi and lost. The former Information and Broadcasting Minister, however, got even greater media attention in 2004, when she put up a very BJP-like opposition to "foreigner" Sonia becoming the Prime Minister. Sushma threatened to cut her tresses, wear a white sari and start living on peanuts (like a traditional widow), if the "national humiliation" was not averted. It was and, mercifully, we were all spared the visual and other consequences of the vow.

            Barging into the debate over the blasts with characteristic belligerence, she has called them a "conspiracy" by Congress and the government in New Delhi. The motive, according to her, was to divert public attention away from the "cash-for-votes" controversy raised during the confidence vote sought and won by the Manmohan Singh government.

            Many, in fact, suspect another conspiracy, by which the BJP let the government win the vote (sought mainly on the US-India nuclear deal, to which the party never had a serious objection) but also allowed some of its members of parliament to flaunt on the floor of the House wads of currency allegedly given as bribes in a show of opposition.

            Swaraj's theory was, clearly, at variance with the take of either Modi or Advani. Yet, she has reiterated that she sticks to the stand, without receiving any party reprimand so far. Veteran BJP-watchers see this as another instance of the party and the parivar deciding to speak with different voices on difficult issues.

            Pity the BJP. The blasts, which spell only terrible suffering for the ordinary citizen, pose so many tricky, tactical questions for the poor party.

            The writer is a journalist based in Chennai, India. A peace activist, he is also the author of a sheaf of poems titled 'At Gunpoint'


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