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B-Schools & research

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  • Prof R K Gupta-India
    Dear shadi, thanks for sending the lead to article. As you remember we have discussed this issue in Forum many times and I have been strong critic of garbage
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Dear shadi,
      thanks for sending the lead to article. As you remember we have
      discussed this issue in Forum many times and I have been strong
      critic of garbage quality of research not only in India but
      globally which is good for nothing. In fact we have been running
      campaign since last several years criticising fraudulent research
      going on in universities and Institutes mainly in developing
      countries like India ,but USA is no exception, for 'Publish or
      Perish' mentality of entrenched tenured academicians who have
      their own axe to grind. Peer reviews every one knows about and are
      done in what way. In fact we have written to Chairman UGC and
      AICTE in India to scrap requirement of PhD for Teachers in
      Technical colleges like Medicine, Engineering, computers, Tourism,
      Hotel management,MBA and MCA type courses where proven practical
      experience and achievement track record is itself evidence of
      research and utility for society. The professors must be from well
      known and profitable industry with proven track record for several
      years and paid well to attract and retain them from industry.

      In fact I call it 'garbage recycling theory' of research by
      academicians referring to crap of each other and deriving
      conclusions. Which means instead of right ingredients ,trash may
      get filtered and concentrated and recycled over and over without
      any factual increase in knowledge. It is dangerous too. In
      Research it is essential for having 2 quality points:
      1.Significant departure from existing paradigms or observations to
      uncover additional facts and ways of doing things.
      2.Applicability of this investigation for meaningful use to solve
      any of social/human/organisational problem.
      Best of our Institutes therefore, have failed to come up with even
      one solution or model for say india's Economic development i8ssue,
      corruption reduction, poverty reduction, optimising of market
      development and distribution costs and adding values in
      organisation including for employees.

      In addition to taking a higher degree like PhD, the research
      scholars must continue to research in their field. It is
      unfortunate that in Indian Universities and Institutes including
      IITs and IIMs and other such hyped places of learning, 'cut and
      paste' is liberally used and once an academic gets a PhD degree,
      the research process is closed. Whereas the long process of search
      for knowledge starts from there only once you have learnt how to
      do and evaluate research. So research degrees are degrees and not
      careers. Obviously majority of these guys are trash generators.
      Hence I have been criticising PhD degrees and closing of minds
      instead of opening up of mind. Most of the guys with whom I have
      interacted while in Industry to seek solutions, I have found them
      to be useless and lacking any practical idea of a situation. It
      was mostly wastage of time and money which we could hardly afford
      being in business. We wanted solutions in definite time frame
      preferably quickly or on the spot.

      Thus radical reforms are required to carry out research, its
      objectives and its evaluation process.

      Our intense campaign in last few years we hope has contributed in
      some way to make some guys rethink about whole issues.

      One alternative model is to install research divisions in
      Industries and they directly deal with B schools and intensify
      interaction. The Indian industry somehow is not willing to spend
      and do that.

      Also dont forget that several reserach porjects are sponsored by
      industrial lobbies with pre set goals of conclusion.This is like
      prostitution of research.

      We hope things will improve in future. Till then most of global
      research will continue to be a 'recycled trash' and waste of paper
      and time, no good for any one. B-schools certainty don't deserve
      such research and academicians. It is injustice with industry and
      society.

      I am happy some organisations have started thinking on these
      lines.

      We shall also continue our campaign.

      Prof R K Gupta

      -----------------------------------------------------------------------
      On Sat, 01 Sep 2007 autoreply@... wrote :
      >
      >- AN ARTICLE FOR YOU, FROM ECONOMIST.COM -
      >
      >Dear Prof.Gupta,
      >
      >Shaadi Katyal (shadikatyal@...) wants you to see this
      >article on Economist.com.
      >
      >The sender also included the following message for you:
      >
      >It is through such research that one progresses in business but
      >if those who dont read are the losers
      >
      >
      >(Note: the sender's e-mail address above has not been
      >verified.)
      >
      >Subscribe to The Economist print edition, get great savings and
      >FREE full access to Economist.com. Click here to subscribe:
      >http://www.economist.com/subscriptions/email
      >
      >Alternatively subscribe to online only version by clicking on the
      >link below and save 25%:
      >
      >http://www.economist.com/subscriptions/offer.cfm?campaign=168-XLMT
      >
      >
      >
      >BUSINESS SCHOOLS
      >Aug 28th 2007
      >
      >What is the point of research carried out in business schools?
      >
      >LIKE other academic institutions, business schools are judged by
      >the
      >quality of the research carried out by their faculties. At the
      >same
      >time they mean to equip their students for the real world,
      >however that
      >is defined. Whether academic research actually produces anything
      >that
      >is useful to the practice of business, or even whether it is its
      >job to
      >do so, are questions that can provoke vigorous arguments on
      >campus.
      >
      >The debate, which first flared during the 1950s, was reignited
      >in
      >August, when AACSB International, the most widely recognised
      >global
      >accrediting agency for business schools, announced it would
      >consider
      >changing the way it evaluates research. The news followed
      >rather
      >damning criticism in 2002 from Jeffrey Pfeffer, a Stanford
      >professor,
      >and Christina Fong of Washington University, which questioned
      >whether
      >business education in its current guise was sustainable. The
      >most
      >controversial recommendation in Aasb's draft report (which was
      >sent
      >round to administrators for their comment) is that the schools
      >be
      >required to demonstrate the value of their faculties' research
      >not
      >simply by listing its citations in journals, but by demonstrating
      >the
      >impact it has in the workaday world.
      >
      >AACSB justifies its stance by saying that it wants schools and
      >faculty
      >to play to their strengths, whether they be in pedagogy, in the
      >research of practical applications, or in scholarly endeavour.
      >And
      >research of any kind is expensive--AACSB points out that
      >business
      >schools in America alone spend more than $320m a year on it. So
      >it
      >seems legitimate to ask for what purpose it is undertaken.
      >
      >On one level, the question is simple to answer. Research in
      >business
      >schools, as anywhere else, is about expanding the boundaries of
      >knowledge; it thrives on answering unasked questions. But it is
      >also
      >about cementing schools'--and professors'--reputations. Schools
      >gain
      >kudos from their faculties' record of publication: which
      >journals
      >publish them, and how often. In some cases, such as with
      >government-funded schools in Britain, it can affect how much
      >money they
      >receive. For professors, the mantra is often "publish or perish".
      >Their
      >careers depend on being seen in the right journals.
      >
      >Part of the trouble is that the journals labour under a similar
      >ethos.
      >They publish more than 20,000 articles each year. Most of the
      >research
      >is highly quantitative, hypothesis-driven and esoteric. As a
      >result, it
      >is almost universally unread by real-world managers. Much of
      >the
      >research criticises other published research. A paper in a 2006
      >issue
      >of STRATEGY & LEADERSHIP commented that "research is not designed
      >with
      >managers' needs in mind, nor is it communicated in the journals
      >they
      >read...For the most part it has become a self-referential closed
      >system
      >[irrelevant to] corporate performance."
      >
      >LOST IN TRANSLATION
      >
      >Most professors argue that it is only right that academic
      >journals be
      >written with other academics in mind. Peer review ensures rigour,
      >after
      >all. However there is a growing belief, both within schools and
      >elsewhere in the sector, that there is a need for research not to
      >be
      >simply rigorous enough to make the journals, but also to be
      >relevant
      >enough to make itself felt in the actual world of business.
      >
      >The argument most often used by defenders of the traditional
      >approach
      >is that research tends to be "translated" into the business
      >world,
      >either by consultants or by teaching in MBA and non-degree
      >executive
      >programmes. But Kai Peters, the chief executive officer of
      >Ashridge
      >Business School in Britain, believes this argument doesn't stack
      >up. He
      >says that research rarely surfaces in the classroom. Most
      >professors,
      >he says, teach standard practice--from a generic marketing book,
      >for
      >example--while spending their research time on something
      >esoteric. "So
      >how is it filtering into schools' programmes?" he asks. "By
      >osmosis?"
      >
      >The "translation" argument is questioned further by Patrick
      >Barwise of
      >London Business School. His own investigating of which research
      >is
      >filtering through to the journals managers and consultants
      >might
      >actually read has convinced him that inductive research--study
      >which
      >seeks to proceed without preconceptions, preferring to observe
      >organisational behaviour and then to draw conclusions on what
      >it
      >finds--is much more likely to be applied in the real world than
      >any
      >other kind. But, he says, most of what actually makes academic
      >journals
      >is theory-driven. Inductive research tends to draw sneers from
      >the
      >editors of academic journals.
      >
      >In this climate, Aasb's proposals to evaluate research in terms
      >of
      >practical relevance are likely to come up against strong
      >opposition at
      >the faculty level. This is partly because the natural tendency
      >of
      >academics is to resist interference in their work. But there is
      >also a
      >psychological barrier to overcome. Business education suffers
      > from what
      >Professor Barwise describes as "physics-envy". A love affair
      >with
      >theory-driven research can be traced back to the 1950s, when many
      >of
      >today's leading business schools were first launched. The new
      >institutions were often belittled by other departments, who
      >regarded
      >them as little more than vocational colleges. In efforts to
      >prove
      >themselves to their better-esteemed counterparts, business
      >faculty
      >embraced an unswervingly scientific approach.
      >
      >RANK OUTSIDERS
      >
      >It is a mindset that will be difficult to undo. Although AACSB
      >says its
      >proposals are meant to make business schools centres of
      >practical
      >research and pedagogy, rather than sanctuaries of
      >discipline-based
      >scholarship, their faculties will fear that adopting them will
      >downgrade their own status. Furthermore, professors' prospects
      >of
      >achieving tenure at their own institutions--or of being
      >headhunted by
      >others--are themselves linked to their publication in journals.
      >On an
      >individual basis, they are left with little incentive to turn
      >away from
      >traditional and esoteric research.
      >
      >How to proceed from here? If faculty refuse to accept this type
      >of
      >reform, Aasb's proposals are powerless--the accrediting agency is
      >no
      >more than the sum of its parts. But another, more powerful beast
      >is
      >lurking--the MBA rankings. Two of the most important--those
      >published
      >by the FINANCIAL TIMES and BUSINESS WEEK--now score schools on
      >their
      >contribution to both journals they consider purely "academic" and
      >ones
      >they consider "practitioner"--ie, ones managers might read.
      >
      >Business schools inhabit a highly competitive world; no matter
      >what
      >they may say, they care intensely about their rankings. If they
      >find
      >they can improve their positions by pursuing more practical
      >research
      >programmes, their administrators' attitudes may yet change.
      >Whatever
      >the defenders of academic purity may wish, there is hope for the
      >real
      >world yet.
      >
      >
      >See this article with graphics and related items at
      >http://www.economist.com/email/confirm.cfm
      >
      >Go to http://www.economist.com for more global news, views and
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    • shaadi katyalsearch
      Dear member We have gone off the track of meaning of economist article. You are talking just opposite to spirit of article; then why you sent it in first
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Dear member
        We have gone off the track of meaning of economist article. You are talking just opposite to spirit of article; then why you sent it in first place?
        The article clearly points to worthlessness of the foolish and fraudulent B school research which no one wants to read as these are theoretical and superficial work no one wants to get bored with and which has not practical relevance.
        The purpose of research is not to train students. For that they are given separate projects and case studies as far as Business management is concerned. For engineering medical students lab work is best thing to Learn with .Undergraduate and master course don't need research work.
        It is matter of shame that most of these research work publishers in physics department pr electrical engineering can't put a fuse wire in their home supply switch board.
        The idiots who have not sold even a pin in life teach marketing and talk big in theoretical papers copied from each other's work in stupid journals. The journals are a big business. The idiots charge money now a days from authors to publish research paper and take 1 years to publish it.This is nothing but rhetoric as if they only know knowledge and try to make fool of researchers. It is all fraud. Majority of research in USA also is done on money of sponsors who fix what is to be found after research.
        For knowing how consumers behave one has to take a salesman's bag and move from door to door like I did. By looking into eye of customer I can tell if she will buy or not.
        Excepting for 10% genuine guys , the other 90 % including Harvard schools do fraudulent and predecided research work on behest of their funding agencies.
        The referencing system is actually generating crap as one garbage is referred by other guy.

        In developing countries like India is worse;in my opinion 98% professors do superficial work without any knowledge about reality's are very good critcs. i fi write something or deign something, Indians can rip it apart.
        Please don't mix up purpose of research and teaching students.
        Yes senior students like those doing Masters/MPhil by dissertation or fellowship are supposed to assist profs in their research work. But what research and for what purpose?To publish more paper than others so one's tenure is secure?'publish or perish paradigm' of idiotic academic world .Who gave this rule?. Why you should publish unless necessary to let world know if you have found something new and explanatory of existing body of knowledge in better way.
        This is tremendous wastage of paper and human energy for no useful purpose. After all to publish journals you Need paper which comes from forests.

        Let us protest and criticize this frayed going o0n around the world. You will one guy says ghee is not good for health and other one immediately thereafter says good for health as he is funded by dairy industry.
        Cant you see?
        The west is feeding poisonous drugs to world and they surreptiously conduct experiments on people of backward countries like indecently in news the British conducted poison gas experiment on Indian soldiers some year back.

        In my view research should be well defined with desired outcome and to solve some human curiosity and problem and not give 100 journals name in bibliography to show others that how scholarly the guy is. How does it matter and how will check if he actually read more than a few of reference list. Cant help laughing. This global fraud of substandard and worthless guys ruling universities and injustice with students must stop. Society needs solutions and better products. Not stupid articles in stupid journals.





        Dear Prof. Gupta,

        I sent this article and many others to all concerned
        with developments in India both in Economy and
        Education. It is worthwhile to have some open
        discussions with facts and figures.
        This article also mentions that most of the work is
        not read or utilised and this is the major cause of
        this arguments.
        The Universities in USA require research in every field
        and publications of papers to retain tenure. Most of
        the work is done by students. I recall when I was
        doing my doctorate work I had to write quite few
        papers and it required lot of research. some of the
        materials was published inder Professor name.The whole
        idea of this research is to get fats and figures at
        one place instead of looking all over the
        field and for this we the students are the one who do
        the leg work.I am for it because though most of us
        spent hours and days doing research, we as a student
        also learnt a lot.
        I do not agree that such work is worthless because many
        new avenues open up for the student and instead of
        just memorising what will be for examination, as done
        in India,one learns the real meaning of research.
        I can see the sorry state of affairs in developing
        nations because of the lack of library and latest
        magazines. Being new in this field and lack of
        resources our nation might not be publishing a lot of
        research but I for one having done for years and later
        utilised in the Business field would not be negative
        to it.
        The very fact that one spends hours of research oepns
        one eyes and when one completes the assignment it is
        very different feelings. I* recall my very first
        quarter at the University being asked to write paper
        and looking like a Dummy what paper?

        It may be that all information and data collected
        might not be published or of no use but it give a lot
        of confidence and creates interest in a student to
        learn more.

        Regards
        shaadi


        --- Prof R K Gupta-India <cityju@...>
        wrote:

        > Dear shadi,
        > thanks for sending the lead to article. As you
        > remember we have
      • shadi katyalsearch
        Dear Prof. Gupta, I sent this article and many others to all concerned with developments in India both in Economy and Education. It is worthwhile to have some
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 1, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          Dear Prof. Gupta,

          I sent this article and many others to all concerned
          with developments in India both in Economy and
          Education. It is worthwhile to have some open
          discussions with facts and figures.
          This article also mentions that most of the work is
          not read or utilised and this is the major cuasse of
          this arguments.
          The Universites in USA require research in every field
          and publications of papers to retain tenure. Most of
          the work is done by students. I recall when I was
          doing my doctorate work I had to write quite few
          papers and it required lot of research. some of the
          materials was published inder Professor name.The whole
          idea of this research is to get fats and figures at
          one place instead of looking all over the
          field and for this we the students are the one who do
          the leg work.I am for it because though most of us
          spent hours and days doing research, we as a student
          also learnt a lot.
          I donot agree that such work is worthless because many
          new avenues open up for the student and instead of
          just memorising what will be for examination, as done
          in India,one learns the real meaning of research.
          I can see the sorry state of affaires in developing
          nations because of the lack of library and latest
          megazines. Being new in this field and lack of
          resources our nation might not be publishing a lot of
          research but I for one having done for years and later
          utilised in the Business field would not be negative
          to it.
          The very fact that one spends hours of research oepns
          one eyes and when one completes the assignment it is
          very different feelings. I* recall my very first
          quarter at the Univeersity being asked to write paper
          and looking like a Dummy what paper?

          It may be that all information and data collected
          might not be published or of no use but it give a lot
          of confidence and creats interedst in a student to
          learn more.

          Regards
          shadi










          --- Prof R K Gupta-India <cityju@...>
          wrote:

          > Dear shadi,
          > thanks for sending the lead to article. As you
          > remember we have
          > discussed this issue in Forum many times and I have
          > been strong
          > critic of garbage quality of research not only in
          > India but
          > globally which is good for nothing. In fact we have
          > been running
          > campaign since last several years criticising
          > fraudulent research
          > going on in universities and Institutes mainly in
          > developing
          > countries like India ,but USA is no exception, for
          > 'Publish or
          > Perish' mentality of entrenched tenured
          > academicians who have
          > their own axe to grind. Peer reviews every one knows
          > about and are
          > done in what way. In fact we have written to
          > Chairman UGC and
          > AICTE in India to scrap requirement of PhD for
          > Teachers in
          > Technical colleges like Medicine, Engineering,
          > computers, Tourism,
          > Hotel management,MBA and MCA type courses where
          > proven practical
          > experience and achievement track record is itself
          > evidence of
          > research and utility for society. The professors
          > must be from well
          > known and profitable industry with proven track
          > record for several
          > years and paid well to attract and retain them from
          > industry.
          >
          > In fact I call it 'garbage recycling theory' of
          > research by
          > academicians referring to crap of each other and
          > deriving
          > conclusions. Which means instead of right
          > ingredients ,trash may
          > get filtered and concentrated and recycled over and
          > over without
          > any factual increase in knowledge. It is dangerous
          > too. In
          > Research it is essential for having 2 quality
          > points:
          > 1.Significant departure from existing paradigms or
          > observations to
          > uncover additional facts and ways of doing things.
          > 2.Applicability of this investigation for meaningful
          > use to solve
          > any of social/human/organisational problem.
          > Best of our Institutes therefore, have failed to
          > come up with even
          > one solution or model for say india's Economic
          > development i8ssue,
          > corruption reduction, poverty reduction, optimising
          > of market
          > development and distribution costs and adding values
          > in
          > organisation including for employees.
          >
          > In addition to taking a higher degree like PhD, the
          > research
          > scholars must continue to research in their field.
          > It is
          > unfortunate that in Indian Universities and
          > Institutes including
          > IITs and IIMs and other such hyped places of
          > learning, 'cut and
          > paste' is liberally used and once an academic gets a
          > PhD degree,
          > the research process is closed. Whereas the long
          > process of search
          > for knowledge starts from there only once you have
          > learnt how to
          > do and evaluate research. So research degrees are
          > degrees and not
          > careers. Obviously majority of these guys are trash
          > generators.
          > Hence I have been criticising PhD degrees and
          > closing of minds
          > instead of opening up of mind. Most of the guys with
          > whom I have
          > interacted while in Industry to seek solutions, I
          > have found them
          > to be useless and lacking any practical idea of a
          > situation. It
          > was mostly wastage of time and money which we could
          > hardly afford
          > being in business. We wanted solutions in definite
          > time frame
          > preferably quickly or on the spot.
          >
          > Thus radical reforms are required to carry out
          > research, its
          > objectives and its evaluation process.
          >
          > Our intense campaign in last few years we hope has
          > contributed in
          > some way to make some guys rethink about whole
          > issues.
          >
          > One alternative model is to install research
          > divisions in
          > Industries and they directly deal with B schools and
          > intensify
          > interaction. The Indian industry somehow is not
          > willing to spend
          > and do that.
          >
          > Also dont forget that several reserach porjects are
          > sponsored by
          > industrial lobbies with pre set goals of
          > conclusion.This is like
          > prostitution of research.
          >
          > We hope things will improve in future. Till then
          > most of global
          > research will continue to be a 'recycled trash' and
          > waste of paper
          > and time, no good for any one. B-schools certainty
          > don't deserve
          > such research and academicians. It is injustice with
          > industry and
          > society.
          >
          > I am happy some organisations have started thinking
          > on these
          > lines.
          >
          > We shall also continue our campaign.
          >
          > Prof R K Gupta
          >
          >
          -----------------------------------------------------------------------
          > On Sat, 01 Sep 2007 autoreply@... wrote :
          > >
          > >- AN ARTICLE FOR YOU, FROM ECONOMIST.COM -
          > >
          > >Dear Prof.Gupta,
          > >
          > >Shaadi Katyal (shadikatyal@...) wants you to
          > see this
          > >article on Economist.com.
          > >
          > >The sender also included the following message for
          > you:
          > >
          > >It is through such research that one progresses in
          > business but
          > >if those who dont read are the losers
          > >
          > >
          > >(Note: the sender's e-mail address above has not
          > been
          > >verified.)
          > >
          > >Subscribe to The Economist print edition, get great
          > savings and
          > >FREE full access to Economist.com. Click here to
          > subscribe:
          > >http://www.economist.com/subscriptions/email
          > >
          > >Alternatively subscribe to online only version by
          > clicking on the
          > >link below and save 25%:
          > >
          >
          >http://www.economist.com/subscriptions/offer.cfm?campaign=168-XLMT
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >BUSINESS SCHOOLS
          > >Aug 28th 2007
          > >
          > >What is the point of research carried out in
          > business schools?
          > >
          > >LIKE other academic institutions, business schools
          > are judged by
          > >the
          > >quality of the research carried out by their
          > faculties. At the
          > >same
          > >time they mean to equip their students for the real
          > world,
          > >however that
          > >is defined. Whether academic research actually
          > produces anything
          > >that
          > >is useful to the practice of business, or even
          > whether it is its
          > >job to
          > >do so, are questions that can provoke vigorous
          > arguments on
          > >campus.
          > >
          > >The debate, which first flared during the 1950s,
          > was reignited
          >
          === message truncated ===




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