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Jackson update letter

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  • imjaniejac@aol.com
    Hi folks, I need to write to you because, though not a whole lot has changed on the Jackson web site, there has been a lot of work going on in the
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 19, 2010
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      Hi folks,
       
      I need to write to you because, though not a whole lot has changed on the Jackson web site, there has been a lot of work going on in the background.  So I wanted to give you an update.  This background may be more than some of you want to know; but for those who are interested, it is an interesting challenge.  It appears that our Robert Jackson of Hempstead may have had some relatives back in England who immigrated here in a different passage than Robert took.  (Of course, we don't even know how or when Robert arrived, since he is on NO passenger list!)
       
      Nearly a year ago a Tom Jackson of Kentucky participated in the Jackson Project at FTDNA and his DNA matches the DNA of Robert's son, Col. John Jackson.  Tom's Y-DNA results not only matched closely to Col. John Jackson but matched 67/67 with Charles McAnally/Jackson and was the first Hempstead Jackson to ever have the same mutation at DYS 413 a & b as the two McAnally/Jacksons have. 
       
      Jack McAnally, Bob Mitchell and I began to look into Tom's ancestry to find where he might be connected.  Bob found a pension record of a Samuel Jackson who was born in Virginia.  This record had with it a letter from the pension administrator's office written to an earlier Judge Jackson who had inquired about Samuel.  The letter lists Samuel's wife and several children who were still living in 1855.  From this list of children we began searching their descendants, trying to find more living Jackson sons who would be willing to participate in DNA testing to verify our research and to help in the research of this Samuel in Virginia.  So I've been calling this the Virginia Project because we haven't had prior knowledge of any of Robert's descendants in Colonial Virginia.
       
      When the Judge's letter revealed the name of one son was Zephaniah, Jack McAnally became very interested as previous to this discovery, Jack had searched for years in the Franklin Co., Kentucky records for some hint of a Jackson connection to the sire of his second great-grandfather and had essentially eliminated all but a person by the name of Zephaniah Jackson.  So Jack has spent hours, weeks, and months really digging with me, transcribing old deeds and wills to find the connections between these folks.  I don't believe anyone has researched this Samuel's line before, except Cindy McCachern who has posted many Prince William documents online.  Prince William is a 'lost records' county and so many records are missing.  As we found other descendants, we also found other Jackson researchers who joined us by offering their research.  So other researchers have joined our community and the Jacksonresearch yahoo group.

      Tom Jackson is a direct descendant of Willis Jackson and there is a 99.9% probability that Willis is the son of a Charles Jackson that also appears on the Samuel Jackson pension papers.  We found a documented living descendant of Zephaniah who was willing to have the DNA test done (Kenneth Vance Jackson) and sure enough, he also proved to be a Hempstead Jackson, with again the special mutation at DYS 413.  Now we had two men who were a match to McAnally/Jacksons!  And so it went as we tried to verify each branch.  But Tom's line has a weak link in it - there is no genealogical documentation for Charles to be the father of Willis and though the chart looks logical and the Y-DNA is compelling to indicate this, some of the family doesn't feel that it is correct. 
       
      And during all of this study, Lee Spencer Jackson received his DNA results which also say he is a Hempstead Jackson and HIS line runs back to Prince William County as early as 1694 but his line does not exhibit the mutation at DYS 413 as Tom and Kenneth do. Then to add more mystery to the study, John and Mark Lynn had their Y-DNA test prove to be Hempstead with their patriarch, Thompson Lynn, also being from the same area of Stafford, Prince William and Fauquier Counties of Virginia. Just recently Girard Lynn's test has proven that the Lynn/Jackson connection goes back as early as the 1720s. But finding the mutual connection between all of these men is still an ongoing study.  We've never known before of any Hempstead Jackson being in that area of the country that early, so this has been and still is a very interesting genealogical challenge that has the following three possible connections the Hempstead Jacksons of NY:
      1. The most recent common ancestors of these Virginia Jackson are direct descendants of Robert Jackson of Hempstead Long Island NY through Col. John Jackson.
      2. The most recent common ancestors of these Virginia Jacksons are direct descendants of Robert Jackson of Hempstead Long Island NY through Samuel Jackson the youngest son of said Robert Jackson.
      3. The most recent common ancestor of these Virginia Jacksons are direct descendants of a second immigration from Europe with a relative of Robert Jackson.
       
      If some of the Long Island researchers could find ANYTHING about Robert's son Samuel, that would be a very big plus, either to verify or rule out the possibility of Samuel migrating to the northern Virginia area.  The earliest Samuel we have found in northern Virginia had land by 1694.
       
      So Tom Jackson's DNA test initiated this year long research project.  It has finally come to a point where it could be posted online and Jack has uploaded our file at rootsweb here:  http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=virginiajackson&id=I108.  There are now over 1,100 descendants in this file with only about 4 'studied conjectures' and these are clearly marked in the individuals' notes.  We decided to put it on rootsweb (and link to it) because of the greater exposure and because there is no documented connection to Robert's line.   
       
      Link to the Virginia Project page on the Jackson site:
      http://www.jacksonfamilygenealogy.com/pages/Virginia%20Project.htm
      Link to the Additions and Changes page (yes there are a few): http://www.jacksonfamilygenealogy.com/pages/additionsandchanges2010.htm
       
      If you have opinions and/or comments about this, I'd be glad to hear them!
      Happy hunting,
      Janie
    • Woody
      Janie, Thanks for all the efforts you provide for the families. An interesting find. I wish my DNA 67 markers could be used in the Jackson Project but as a
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 19, 2010
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        Janie,
         
        Thanks for all the efforts you provide for the families.
        An interesting find.
        I wish my DNA 67 markers could be used in the Jackson Project but as a Williams male I have not found a method to do so.
        Jackson is one of my blood lines; from my father's mother.
         
        I encourage all to keep up the efforts.
         
        Woodrow (Woody) A. Williams
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Friday, February 19, 2010 1:26 PM
        Subject: [Jackson_Genealogy] Jackson update letter

        Hi folks,
         
        I need to write to you because, though not a whole lot has changed on the Jackson web site, there has been a lot of work going on in the background.  So I wanted to give you an update.  This background may be more than some of you want to know; but for those who are interested, it is an interesting challenge.  It appears that our Robert Jackson of Hempstead may have had some relatives back in England who immigrated here in a different passage than Robert took.  (Of course, we don't even know how or when Robert arrived, since he is on NO passenger list!)
         
        Nearly a year ago a Tom Jackson of Kentucky participated in the Jackson Project at FTDNA and his DNA matches the DNA of Robert's son, Col. John Jackson.  Tom's Y-DNA results not only matched closely to Col. John Jackson but matched 67/67 with Charles McAnally/Jackson and was the first Hempstead Jackson to ever have the same mutation at DYS 413 a & b as the two McAnally/Jacksons have. 
         
        Jack McAnally, Bob Mitchell and I began to look into Tom's ancestry to find where he might be connected.  Bob found a pension record of a Samuel Jackson who was born in Virginia.  This record had with it a letter from the pension administrator's office written to an earlier Judge Jackson who had inquired about Samuel.  The letter lists Samuel's wife and several children who were still living in 1855.  From this list of children we began searching their descendants, trying to find more living Jackson sons who would be willing to participate in DNA testing to verify our research and to help in the research of this Samuel in Virginia.  So I've been calling this the Virginia Project because we haven't had prior knowledge of any of Robert's descendants in Colonial Virginia.
         
        When the Judge's letter revealed the name of one son was Zephaniah, Jack McAnally became very interested as previous to this discovery, Jack had searched for years in the Franklin Co., Kentucky records for some hint of a Jackson connection to the sire of his second great-grandfather and had essentially eliminated all but a person by the name of Zephaniah Jackson.  So Jack has spent hours, weeks, and months really digging with me, transcribing old deeds and wills to find the connections between these folks.  I don't believe anyone has researched this Samuel's line before, except Cindy McCachern who has posted many Prince William documents online.  Prince William is a 'lost records' county and so many records are missing.  As we found other descendants, we also found other Jackson researchers who joined us by offering their research.  So other researchers have joined our community and the Jacksonresearch yahoo group.

        Tom Jackson is a direct descendant of Willis Jackson and there is a 99.9% probability that Willis is the son of a Charles Jackson that also appears on the Samuel Jackson pension papers.  We found a documented living descendant of Zephaniah who was willing to have the DNA test done (Kenneth Vance Jackson) and sure enough, he also proved to be a Hempstead Jackson, with again the special mutation at DYS 413.  Now we had two men who were a match to McAnally/Jacksons!  And so it went as we tried to verify each branch.  But Tom's line has a weak link in it - there is no genealogical documentation for Charles to be the father of Willis and though the chart looks logical and the Y-DNA is compelling to indicate this, some of the family doesn't feel that it is correct. 
         
        And during all of this study, Lee Spencer Jackson received his DNA results which also say he is a Hempstead Jackson and HIS line runs back to Prince William County as early as 1694 but his line does not exhibit the mutation at DYS 413 as Tom and Kenneth do. Then to add more mystery to the study, John and Mark Lynn had their Y-DNA test prove to be Hempstead with their patriarch, Thompson Lynn, also being from the same area of Stafford, Prince William and Fauquier Counties of Virginia. Just recently Girard Lynn's test has proven that the Lynn/Jackson connection goes back as early as the 1720s. But finding the mutual connection between all of these men is still an ongoing study.  We've never known before of any Hempstead Jackson being in that area of the country that early, so this has been and still is a very interesting genealogical challenge that has the following three possible connections the Hempstead Jacksons of NY:
        1. The most recent common ancestors of these Virginia Jackson are direct descendants of Robert Jackson of Hempstead Long Island NY through Col. John Jackson.
        2. The most recent common ancestors of these Virginia Jacksons are direct descendants of Robert Jackson of Hempstead Long Island NY through Samuel Jackson the youngest son of said Robert Jackson.
        3. The most recent common ancestor of these Virginia Jacksons are direct descendants of a second immigration from Europe with a relative of Robert Jackson.
         
        If some of the Long Island researchers could find ANYTHING about Robert's son Samuel, that would be a very big plus, either to verify or rule out the possibility of Samuel migrating to the northern Virginia area.  The earliest Samuel we have found in northern Virginia had land by 1694.
         
        So Tom Jackson's DNA test initiated this year long research project.  It has finally come to a point where it could be posted online and Jack has uploaded our file at rootsweb here:  http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=virginiajackson&id=I108.  There are now over 1,100 descendants in this file with only about 4 'studied conjectures' and these are clearly marked in the individuals' notes.  We decided to put it on rootsweb (and link to it) because of the greater exposure and because there is no documented connection to Robert's line.   
         
        Link to the Virginia Project page on the Jackson site:
        http://www.jacksonfamilygenealogy.com/pages/Virginia%20Project.htm
        Link to the Additions and Changes page (yes there are a few): http://www.jacksonfamilygenealogy.com/pages/additionsandchanges2010.htm
         
        If you have opinions and/or comments about this, I'd be glad to hear them!
        Happy hunting,
        Janie
      • Wayne Oswald
        God bless all of you who have done this research.  Even though I can t plug into this with my Jackson line, I find this endeavor most interesting to the point
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 19, 2010
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          God bless all of you who have done this research.  Even though I can't plug into this with my Jackson line, I find this endeavor most interesting to the point of awesome.  I will just have to wait to meet my ancestors in heaven.  Ruby


          From: "imjaniejac@..." <imjaniejac@...>
          To: Jackson_Genealogy@yahoogroups.com; The_Jackson_Genealogy_Group@...
          Sent: Fri, February 19, 2010 1:26:06 PM
          Subject: [Jackson_Genealogy] Jackson update letter

           

          Hi folks,
           
          I need to write to you because, though not a whole lot has changed on the Jackson web site, there has been a lot of work going on in the background.  So I wanted to give you an update.  This background may be more than some of you want to know; but for those who are interested, it is an interesting challenge.  It appears that our Robert Jackson of Hempstead may have had some relatives back in England who immigrated here in a different passage than Robert took.  (Of course, we don't even know how or when Robert arrived, since he is on NO passenger list!)
           
          Nearly a year ago a Tom Jackson of Kentucky participated in the Jackson Project at FTDNA and his DNA matches the DNA of Robert's son, Col. John Jackson.  Tom's Y-DNA results not only matched closely to Col. John Jackson but matched 67/67 with Charles McAnally/Jackson and was the first Hempstead Jackson to ever have the same mutation at DYS 413 a & b as the two McAnally/Jacksons have. 
           
          Jack McAnally, Bob Mitchell and I began to look into Tom's ancestry to find where he might be connected.  Bob found a pension record of a Samuel Jackson who was born in Virginia.  This record had with it a letter from the pension administrator' s office written to an earlier Judge Jackson who had inquired about Samuel.  The letter lists Samuel's wife and several children who were still living in 1855.  From this list of children we began searching their descendants, trying to find more living Jackson sons who would be willing to participate in DNA testing to verify our research and to help in the research of this Samuel in Virginia.  So I've been calling this the Virginia Project because we haven't had prior knowledge of any of Robert's descendants in Colonial Virginia.
           
          When the Judge's letter revealed the name of one son was Zephaniah, Jack McAnally became very interested as previous to this discovery, Jack had searched for years in the Franklin Co., Kentucky records for some hint of a Jackson connection to the sire of his second great-grandfather and had essentially eliminated all but a person by the name of Zephaniah Jackson.  So Jack has spent hours, weeks, and months really digging with me, transcribing old deeds and wills to find the connections between these folks.  I don't believe anyone has researched this Samuel's line before, except Cindy McCachern who has posted many Prince William documents online.  Prince William is a 'lost records' county and so many records are missing.  As we found other descendants, we also found other Jackson researchers who joined us by offering their research.  So other researchers have joined our community and the Jacksonresearch yahoo group.

          Tom Jackson is a direct descendant of Willis Jackson and there is a 99.9% probability that Willis is the son of a Charles Jackson that also appears on the Samuel Jackson pension papers.  We found a documented living descendant of Zephaniah who was willing to have the DNA test done (Kenneth Vance Jackson) and sure enough, he also proved to be a Hempstead Jackson, with again the special mutation at DYS 413.  Now we had two men who were a match to McAnally/Jacksons!  And so it went as we tried to verify each branch.  But Tom's line has a weak link in it - there is no genealogical documentation for Charles to be the father of Willis and though the chart looks logical and the Y-DNA is compelling to indicate this, some of the family doesn't feel that it is correct. 
           
          And during all of this study, Lee Spencer Jackson received his DNA results which also say he is a Hempstead Jackson and HIS line runs back to Prince William County as early as 1694 but his line does not exhibit the mutation at DYS 413 as Tom and Kenneth do. Then to add more mystery to the study, John and Mark Lynn had their Y-DNA test prove to be Hempstead with their patriarch, Thompson Lynn, also being from the same area of Stafford, Prince William and Fauquier Counties of Virginia. Just recently Girard Lynn's test has proven that the Lynn/Jackson connection goes back as early as the 1720s. But finding the mutual connection between all of these men is still an ongoing study.  We've never known before of any Hempstead Jackson being in that area of the country that early, so this has been and still is a very interesting genealogical challenge that has the following three possible connections the Hempstead Jacksons of NY:
          1. The most recent common ancestors of these Virginia Jackson are direct descendants of Robert Jackson of Hempstead Long Island NY through Col. John Jackson.
          2. The most recent common ancestors of these Virginia Jacksons are direct descendants of Robert Jackson of Hempstead Long Island NY through Samuel Jackson the youngest son of said Robert Jackson.
          3. The most recent common ancestor of these Virginia Jacksons are direct descendants of a second immigration from Europe with a relative of Robert Jackson.
           
          If some of the Long Island researchers could find ANYTHING about Robert's son Samuel, that would be a very big plus, either to verify or rule out the possibility of Samuel migrating to the northern Virginia area.  The earliest Samuel we have found in northern Virginia had land by 1694.
           
          So Tom Jackson's DNA test initiated this year long research project.  It has finally come to a point where it could be posted online and Jack has uploaded our file at rootsweb here:  http://wc.rootsweb. ancestry. com/cgi-bin/ igm.cgi?op= GET&db=virginiajackson&id=I108.  There are now over 1,100 descendants in this file with only about 4 'studied conjectures' and these are clearly marked in the individuals' notes.  We decided to put it on rootsweb (and link to it) because of the greater exposure and because there is no documented connection to Robert's line.   
           
          Link to the Virginia Project page on the Jackson site:
          http://www.jacksonf amilygenealogy. com/pages/ Virginia% 20Project. htm
          Link to the Additions and Changes page (yes there are a few): http://www.jacksonf amilygenealogy. com/pages/ additionsandchan ges2010.htm
           
          If you have opinions and/or comments about this, I'd be glad to hear them!
          Happy hunting,
          Janie
        • Greg Jackson
          Good morning,   I read all your posts with much interest.  Without having my detail in front of me, I am descended from a Cornelius Jackson who was born in
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 22, 2010
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            Good morning,
             
            I read all your posts with much interest.  Without having my detail in front of me, I am descended from a Cornelius Jackson who was born in 1790 in NC.  His father was Thomas Jackson, Jr. (m. Asenith Hammonds) who came from England (parts unknown and method unknown).  I can only assume his father was Thomas Jackson, Sr. but I have no details on him.  We also do not have any information of the siblings of our Cornelius Jackson who eventually settled in Alabama.  Cornelius Jackson was willed some land from his grandfather (?? Hammonds) but we do not know why he did not stay in NC.  Some other first names that continued down the line are John, William, Cornelius, and Duncan.  These may be quite common names.  I've dabbled in my family research off and on for many years but haven't had the time recently.
             
            I have done a partial marker test previously to help a fellow Jackson further down the line.  Is it possible to submit my results for that test to see if I am any where close to being related to this Jackson line?  Forgive me, but I can't remember exactly how these marker tests work. 
             
            I look forward to hearing back from you.
             
            Thanks Greg

            --- On Fri, 2/19/10, imjaniejac@... <imjaniejac@...> wrote:

            From: imjaniejac@... <imjaniejac@...>
            Subject: [Jackson_Genealogy] Jackson update letter
            To: Jackson_Genealogy@yahoogroups.com, The_Jackson_Genealogy_Group@...
            Date: Friday, February 19, 2010, 2:26 PM

             
            Hi folks,
             
            I need to write to you because, though not a whole lot has changed on the Jackson web site, there has been a lot of work going on in the background.  So I wanted to give you an update.  This background may be more than some of you want to know; but for those who are interested, it is an interesting challenge.  It appears that our Robert Jackson of Hempstead may have had some relatives back in England who immigrated here in a different passage than Robert took.  (Of course, we don't even know how or when Robert arrived, since he is on NO passenger list!)
             
            Nearly a year ago a Tom Jackson of Kentucky participated in the Jackson Project at FTDNA and his DNA matches the DNA of Robert's son, Col. John Jackson.  Tom's Y-DNA results not only matched closely to Col. John Jackson but matched 67/67 with Charles McAnally/Jackson and was the first Hempstead Jackson to ever have the same mutation at DYS 413 a & b as the two McAnally/Jacksons have. 
             
            Jack McAnally, Bob Mitchell and I began to look into Tom's ancestry to find where he might be connected.  Bob found a pension record of a Samuel Jackson who was born in Virginia.  This record had with it a letter from the pension administrator' s office written to an earlier Judge Jackson who had inquired about Samuel.  The letter lists Samuel's wife and several children who were still living in 1855.  From this list of children we began searching their descendants, trying to find more living Jackson sons who would be willing to participate in DNA testing to verify our research and to help in the research of this Samuel in Virginia.  So I've been calling this the Virginia Project because we haven't had prior knowledge of any of Robert's descendants in Colonial Virginia.
             
            When the Judge's letter revealed the name of one son was Zephaniah, Jack McAnally became very interested as previous to this discovery, Jack had searched for years in the Franklin Co., Kentucky records for some hint of a Jackson connection to the sire of his second great-grandfather and had essentially eliminated all but a person by the name of Zephaniah Jackson.  So Jack has spent hours, weeks, and months really digging with me, transcribing old deeds and wills to find the connections between these folks.  I don't believe anyone has researched this Samuel's line before, except Cindy McCachern who has posted many Prince William documents online.  Prince William is a 'lost records' county and so many records are missing.  As we found other descendants, we also found other Jackson researchers who joined us by offering their research.  So other researchers have joined our community and the Jacksonresearch yahoo group.

            Tom Jackson is a direct descendant of Willis Jackson and there is a 99.9% probability that Willis is the son of a Charles Jackson that also appears on the Samuel Jackson pension papers.  We found a documented living descendant of Zephaniah who was willing to have the DNA test done (Kenneth Vance Jackson) and sure enough, he also proved to be a Hempstead Jackson, with again the special mutation at DYS 413.  Now we had two men who were a match to McAnally/Jacksons!  And so it went as we tried to verify each branch.  But Tom's line has a weak link in it - there is no genealogical documentation for Charles to be the father of Willis and though the chart looks logical and the Y-DNA is compelling to indicate this, some of the family doesn't feel that it is correct. 
             
            And during all of this study, Lee Spencer Jackson received his DNA results which also say he is a Hempstead Jackson and HIS line runs back to Prince William County as early as 1694 but his line does not exhibit the mutation at DYS 413 as Tom and Kenneth do. Then to add more mystery to the study, John and Mark Lynn had their Y-DNA test prove to be Hempstead with their patriarch, Thompson Lynn, also being from the same area of Stafford, Prince William and Fauquier Counties of Virginia. Just recently Girard Lynn's test has proven that the Lynn/Jackson connection goes back as early as the 1720s. But finding the mutual connection between all of these men is still an ongoing study.  We've never known before of any Hempstead Jackson being in that area of the country that early, so this has been and still is a very interesting genealogical challenge that has the following three possible connections the Hempstead Jacksons of NY:
            1. The most recent common ancestors of these Virginia Jackson are direct descendants of Robert Jackson of Hempstead Long Island NY through Col. John Jackson.
            2. The most recent common ancestors of these Virginia Jacksons are direct descendants of Robert Jackson of Hempstead Long Island NY through Samuel Jackson the youngest son of said Robert Jackson.
            3. The most recent common ancestor of these Virginia Jacksons are direct descendants of a second immigration from Europe with a relative of Robert Jackson.
             
            If some of the Long Island researchers could find ANYTHING about Robert's son Samuel, that would be a very big plus, either to verify or rule out the possibility of Samuel migrating to the northern Virginia area.  The earliest Samuel we have found in northern Virginia had land by 1694.
             
            So Tom Jackson's DNA test initiated this year long research project.  It has finally come to a point where it could be posted online and Jack has uploaded our file at rootsweb here:  http://wc.rootsweb. ancestry. com/cgi-bin/ igm.cgi?op= GET&db=virginiajackson&id=I108.  There are now over 1,100 descendants in this file with only about 4 'studied conjectures' and these are clearly marked in the individuals' notes.  We decided to put it on rootsweb (and link to it) because of the greater exposure and because there is no documented connection to Robert's line.   
             
            Link to the Virginia Project page on the Jackson site:
            http://www.jacksonf amilygenealogy. com/pages/ Virginia% 20Project. htm
            Link to the Additions and Changes page (yes there are a few): http://www.jacksonf amilygenealogy. com/pages/ additionsandchan ges2010.htm
             
            If you have opinions and/or comments about this, I'd be glad to hear them!
            Happy hunting,
            Janie

          • imjaniejac@aol.com
            Hi Greg, Where did you have the DNA test done? If it was done at FamilyTreeDNA (FTDNA) then it is probably already compared to other Jacksons and placed in a
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 22, 2010
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              Hi Greg,
               
              Where did you have the DNA test done?  If it was done at FamilyTreeDNA (FTDNA) then it is probably already compared to other Jacksons and placed in a grouping.  DNA tests done at other labs are not always comparable.  You could send your results at John McAnally jrmcanally@... to learn what he might suggest to you.   We have been recommending that folks use FTDNA because of the size of their data base.  The size of the data base is important as the more folks tested gives more folks to compare to - and the Jackson data base at FTDNA now has nearly 300 Jackson men tested.
               
              You've probably seen it, but I found this site for Thomas Jackson and Asenith Hammonds.  Seems like a good site.  It does have a page about a DNA Lab that I am not familiar with.   If I can help lat me know.
               
              Janie
               
              In a message dated 2/22/2010 9:15:17 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, gjack5404@... writes:
               

              Good morning,
               
              I read all your posts with much interest.  Without having my detail in front of me, I am descended from a Cornelius Jackson who was born in 1790 in NC.  His father was Thomas Jackson, Jr. (m. Asenith Hammonds) who came from England (parts unknown and method unknown).  I can only assume his father was Thomas Jackson, Sr. but I have no details on him.  We also do not have any information of the siblings of our Cornelius Jackson who eventually settled in Alabama.  Cornelius Jackson was willed some land from his grandfather (?? Hammonds) but we do not know why he did not stay in NC.  Some other first names that continued down the line are John, William, Cornelius, and Duncan.  These may be quite common names.  I've dabbled in my family research off and on for many years but haven't had the time recently.
               
              I have done a partial marker test previously to help a fellow Jackson further down the line.  Is it possible to submit my results for that test to see if I am any where close to being related to this Jackson line?  Forgive me, but I can't remember exactly how these marker tests work. 
               
              I look forward to hearing back from you.
               
              Thanks Greg

              --- On Fri, 2/19/10, imjaniejac@aol. com <imjaniejac@aol. com> wrote:

              From: imjaniejac@aol. com <imjaniejac@aol. com>
              Subject: [Jackson_Genealogy] Jackson update letter
              To: Jackson_Genealogy@ yahoogroups. com, The_Jackson_ Genealogy_ Group@yahoo. com
              Date: Friday, February 19, 2010, 2:26 PM

               
              Hi folks,
               
              I need to write to you because, though not a whole lot has changed on the Jackson web site, there has been a lot of work going on in the background.  So I wanted to give you an update.  This background may be more than some of you want to know; but for those who are interested, it is an interesting challenge.  It appears that our Robert Jackson of Hempstead may have had some relatives back in England who immigrated here in a different passage than Robert took.  (Of course, we don't even know how or when Robert arrived, since he is on NO passenger list!)
               
              Nearly a year ago a Tom Jackson of Kentucky participated in the Jackson Project at FTDNA and his DNA matches the DNA of Robert's son, Col. John Jackson.  Tom's Y-DNA results not only matched closely to Col. John Jackson but matched 67/67 with Charles McAnally/Jackson and was the first Hempstead Jackson to ever have the same mutation at DYS 413 a & b as the two McAnally/Jacksons have. 
               
              Jack McAnally, Bob Mitchell and I began to look into Tom's ancestry to find where he might be connected.  Bob found a pension record of a Samuel Jackson who was born in Virginia.  This record had with it a letter from the pension administrator' s office written to an earlier Judge Jackson who had inquired about Samuel.  The letter lists Samuel's wife and several children who were still living in 1855.  From this list of children we began searching their descendants, trying to find more living Jackson sons who would be willing to participate in DNA testing to verify our research and to help in the research of this Samuel in Virginia.  So I've been calling this the Virginia Project because we haven't had prior knowledge of any of Robert's descendants in Colonial Virginia.
               
              When the Judge's letter revealed the name of one son was Zephaniah, Jack McAnally became very interested as previous to this discovery, Jack had searched for years in the Franklin Co., Kentucky records for some hint of a Jackson connection to the sire of his second great-grandfather and had essentially eliminated all but a person by the name of Zephaniah Jackson.  So Jack has spent hours, weeks, and months really digging with me, transcribing old deeds and wills to find the connections between these folks.  I don't believe anyone has researched this Samuel's line before, except Cindy McCachern who has posted many Prince William documents online.  Prince William is a 'lost records' county and so many records are missing.  As we found other descendants, we also found other Jackson researchers who joined us by offering their research.  So other researchers have joined our community and the Jacksonresearch yahoo group.

              Tom Jackson is a direct descendant of Willis Jackson and there is a 99.9% probability that Willis is the son of a Charles Jackson that also appears on the Samuel Jackson pension papers.  We found a documented living descendant of Zephaniah who was willing to have the DNA test done (Kenneth Vance Jackson) and sure enough, he also proved to be a Hempstead Jackson, with again the special mutation at DYS 413.  Now we had two men who were a match to McAnally/Jacksons!  And so it went as we tried to verify each branch.  But Tom's line has a weak link in it - there is no genealogical documentation for Charles to be the father of Willis and though the chart looks logical and the Y-DNA is compelling to indicate this, some of the family doesn't feel that it is correct. 
               
              And during all of this study, Lee Spencer Jackson received his DNA results which also say he is a Hempstead Jackson and HIS line runs back to Prince William County as early as 1694 but his line does not exhibit the mutation at DYS 413 as Tom and Kenneth do. Then to add more mystery to the study, John and Mark Lynn had their Y-DNA test prove to be Hempstead with their patriarch, Thompson Lynn, also being from the same area of Stafford, Prince William and Fauquier Counties of Virginia. Just recently Girard Lynn's test has proven that the Lynn/Jackson connection goes back as early as the 1720s. But finding the mutual connection between all of these men is still an ongoing study.  We've never known before of any Hempstead Jackson being in that area of the country that early, so this has been and still is a very interesting genealogical challenge that has the following three possible connections the Hempstead Jacksons of NY:
              1. The most recent common ancestors of these Virginia Jackson are direct descendants of Robert Jackson of Hempstead Long Island NY through Col. John Jackson.
              2. The most recent common ancestors of these Virginia Jacksons are direct descendants of Robert Jackson of Hempstead Long Island NY through Samuel Jackson the youngest son of said Robert Jackson.
              3. The most recent common ancestor of these Virginia Jacksons are direct descendants of a second immigration from Europe with a relative of Robert Jackson.
               
              If some of the Long Island researchers could find ANYTHING about Robert's son Samuel, that would be a very big plus, either to verify or rule out the possibility of Samuel migrating to the northern Virginia area.  The earliest Samuel we have found in northern Virginia had land by 1694.
               
              So Tom Jackson's DNA test initiated this year long research project.  It has finally come to a point where it could be posted online and Jack has uploaded our file at rootsweb here:  http://wc.rootsweb. ancestry. com/cgi-bin/ igm.cgi?op= GET&db=virginiajackson&id=I108.  There are now over 1,100 descendants in this file with only about 4 'studied conjectures' and these are clearly marked in the individuals' notes.  We decided to put it on rootsweb (and link to it) because of the greater exposure and because there is no documented connection to Robert's line.   
               
              Link to the Virginia Project page on the Jackson site:
              http://www.jacksonf amilygenealogy. com/pages/ Virginia% 20Project. htm
              Link to the Additions and Changes page (yes there are a few): http://www.jacksonf amilygenealogy. com/pages/ additionsandchan ges2010.htm
               
              If you have opinions and/or comments about this, I'd be glad to hear them!
              Happy hunting,
              Janie

            • Janie
              Woody, Did your father s mother have male siblings? If no male Jackson brothers for her, how about up a generation? Did she have Jackson uncles?? Have you
              Message 6 of 8 , Jul 3, 2010
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                Woody,
                Did your father's mother have male siblings?  If no male Jackson brothers for her, how about up a generation?  Did she have Jackson uncles??  Have you researched up the line until you found one or more Jackson males, then search back down THEIR line to find a living male Jackson who might be persuaded to test??  It's just a thought.

                Janie

                --- In Jackson_Genealogy@yahoogroups.com, "Woody" <ifs@...> wrote:
                >
                > Janie,
                >
                > Thanks for all the efforts you provide for the families.
                > An interesting find.
                > I wish my DNA 67 markers could be used in the Jackson Project but as a Williams male I have not found a method to do so.
                > Jackson is one of my blood lines; from my father's mother.
                >
                > I encourage all to keep up the efforts.

              • Woody
                Janie, Thanks. She had two brothers who did not have children. She and her three sisters had numerous children. She had numerous uncles and great uncles. There
                Message 7 of 8 , Jul 5, 2010
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                  Janie,
                   
                  Thanks.
                  She had two brothers who did not have children.
                  She and her three sisters had numerous children.
                  She had numerous uncles and great uncles.
                   
                  There is at least one Jackson male descendent still living.
                  I will contact him.
                   
                  Woody
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Janie
                  Sent: Saturday, July 03, 2010 6:21 PM
                  Subject: [Jackson_Genealogy] Re: Jackson update letter

                  Woody,
                  Did your father's mother have male siblings?  If no male Jackson brothers for her, how about up a generation?  Did she have Jackson uncles??  Have you researched up the line until you found one or more Jackson males, then search back down THEIR line to find a living male Jackson who might be persuaded to test??  It's just a thought.

                  Janie

                  --- In Jackson_Genealogy@yahoogroups.com, "Woody" <ifs@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Janie,
                  >
                  > Thanks for all the efforts you provide for the families.
                  > An interesting find.
                  > I wish my DNA 67 markers could be used in the Jackson Project but as a Williams male I have not found a method to do so.
                  > Jackson is one of my blood lines; from my father's mother.
                  >
                  > I encourage all to keep up the efforts.

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