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parallels from psychological research

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  • arno hutchinson
    Your paper was both insightful and helpful. I found it particularly so, in view of the fact that it parallels some discoveries made in research I have been
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 23, 2001
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      Your paper was both insightful and helpful. I found it particularly so, in view of the fact that it parallels some discoveries made in research I have been doing for the past several years. My research has been in the area of human psychology as uncovered in modern experimental research.
      For example, the following is one example of the material I have discovered: Trabasso and Paul vn den Broek ("Causal Thinking, and the Representation of Narrative Events," Journal of Memory & Language 24 (1985) p. 613): "Not only were central events more often recalled but they were also more frequently summarized and judged as more important than noncentral events...." Also:"'non-central' events do not have consequences that are part of the sequence leading to the end of the story." Finally: "The question of what makes an event memorable or important is answered, in part, by knowledge of an event's relations and the structural role that an event has in the representation of the story."
      Arno M. Hutchinson, Jr.
      retired, and member of the Chicago Society of Biblical Research and of the Society of Biblical Literature. (arno@...)




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Meta Dunn
      Dear Arno Hutchinson, Thanks for the reference. It s something I may want to follow up if I decide to develop the hypothesis further. Greetings from Durham,
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 25, 2001
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        Dear Arno Hutchinson,
        Thanks for the reference. It's something I may want to follow up
        if I decide to develop the hypothesis further.
        Greetings from Durham,
        JDGD

        arno hutchinson wrote:

        > Your paper was both insightful and helpful. I found it particularly so, in view of the fact that it parallels some discoveries made in research I have been doing for the past several years. My research has been in the area of human psychology as uncovered in modern experimental research.
        > For example, the following is one example of the material I have discovered: Trabasso and Paul vn den Broek ("Causal Thinking, and the Representation of Narrative Events," Journal of Memory & Language 24 (1985) p. 613): "Not only were central events more often recalled but they were also more frequently summarized and judged as more important than noncentral events...." Also:"'non-central' events do not have consequences that are part of the sequence leading to the end of the story." Finally: "The question of what makes an event memorable or important is answered, in part, by knowledge of an event's relations and the structural role that an event has in the representation of the story."
        > Arno M. Hutchinson, Jr.
        > retired, and member of the Chicago Society of Biblical Research and of the Society of Biblical Literature. (arno@...)
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
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      • Clayton Stirling Bartholomew
        Professor Dunn, Not being a specialist on this topic I would like to just quote the first chapter of a recent book by E. Earl Ellis where he addresses the oral
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 25, 2001
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          Professor Dunn,

          Not being a specialist on this topic I would like to just quote the first
          chapter of a recent book by E. Earl Ellis where he addresses the oral
          transmission of the gospels. Could you address some comments to Ellis?


          Ellis, E. Earle, Christ and the future in New Testament History, Leiden ;
          Boston : Brill, 2000, quote from page 13-14:

          "From a literary perspective (1) the Gospel traditions give no indication of
          a prior oral stage of transmission, and (2) in the narratives, miracle
          stories, biblical expositions and other forms they exhibit uniform patterns
          which, oral or written, reflect ab initio a carefully cultivated design and
          construction. (3) They also reflect a continuous traditioning process in
          which a transition from oral communal folkloric techniques to written
          individually-designed patterns and techniques observable in the Gospels
          would be virtually impossible: A folkloric origin of the Gospel traditions
          is thereby excluded. (4) References in the Gospels to 'hearing' refer not to
          an oral transmission of tradition but to oral proclamation, often written
          texts. (5) The second-century Fathers' free citation of Jesus' sayings
          likewise is no support for their oral transmission since it is equally
          present in their citation of written Old Testament texts. (6) The attraction
          of 'orality' expressed in Greco-Roman literature appears as a preference not
          for oral transmission of tradition but for discussion with an eyewitness,
          for a writer's oral delivery or for an expert at hand.

          Historically considered, the transmission of religious traditions in early
          Judaism and Christianity also does not favor an oral folkloric explanation.
          In first-century Judaism, both at Qumran and in the rabbinic schools, it
          was a controlled and cultivated process, and it was the same for Jesus
          traditions." . . . (Ellis follows this with some supporting evidence) . . .
          *End of quote*


          Professor Dunn, E.E. Ellis is not directly addressing your thesis, but he is
          addressing the notion of an oral prehistory of the written documents. Since
          this is a major aspect of your thesis I thought that it might be worth while
          to toss E. E. Ellis into this discussion.

          Clay Bartholomew

          --
          Clayton Stirling Bartholomew
          Three Tree Point
          P.O. Box 255 Seahurst WA 98062
        • Meta Dunn
          Dear CSB, Thanks for the question. Did I not respond to Ellis in a footnote? If not in the circulated version, I have in its revised form. My main
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 27, 2001
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            Dear CSB,
            Thanks for the question. Did I not respond to Ellis in a footnote? If
            not in the circulated version, I have in its revised form.
            My main criticism of his thesis is that he works with only the two options
            of oral tradition - ‘folkloric origin’ and the ‘controlled and cultivated
            process’ of the rabbinic schools. The whole point of my paper is that neither
            alternative is appropriate to the character of the traditioning process as still
            evident in the Jesus tradition of the Synoptics. Tertium datur. I simply
            disagree with Earle's first two points, and while agreeing with much of the
            others would want to qualify them in in the light of that third way.
            JDGD

            Clayton Stirling Bartholomew wrote:

            > Professor Dunn,
            >
            > Not being a specialist on this topic I would like to just quote the first
            > chapter of a recent book by E. Earl Ellis where he addresses the oral
            > transmission of the gospels. Could you address some comments to Ellis?
            >
            > Ellis, E. Earle, Christ and the future in New Testament History, Leiden ;
            > Boston : Brill, 2000, quote from page 13-14:
            >
            > "From a literary perspective (1) the Gospel traditions give no indication of
            > a prior oral stage of transmission, and (2) in the narratives, miracle
            > stories, biblical expositions and other forms they exhibit uniform patterns
            > which, oral or written, reflect ab initio a carefully cultivated design and
            > construction. (3) They also reflect a continuous traditioning process in
            > which a transition from oral communal folkloric techniques to written
            > individually-designed patterns and techniques observable in the Gospels
            > would be virtually impossible: A folkloric origin of the Gospel traditions
            > is thereby excluded. (4) References in the Gospels to 'hearing' refer not to
            > an oral transmission of tradition but to oral proclamation, often written
            > texts. (5) The second-century Fathers' free citation of Jesus' sayings
            > likewise is no support for their oral transmission since it is equally
            > present in their citation of written Old Testament texts. (6) The attraction
            > of 'orality' expressed in Greco-Roman literature appears as a preference not
            > for oral transmission of tradition but for discussion with an eyewitness,
            > for a writer's oral delivery or for an expert at hand.
            >
            > Historically considered, the transmission of religious traditions in early
            > Judaism and Christianity also does not favor an oral folkloric explanation.
            > In first-century Judaism, both at Qumran and in the rabbinic schools, it
            > was a controlled and cultivated process, and it was the same for Jesus
            > traditions." . . . (Ellis follows this with some supporting evidence) . . .
            > *End of quote*
            >
            > Professor Dunn, E.E. Ellis is not directly addressing your thesis, but he is
            > addressing the notion of an oral prehistory of the written documents. Since
            > this is a major aspect of your thesis I thought that it might be worth while
            > to toss E. E. Ellis into this discussion.
            >
            > Clay Bartholomew
            >
            > --
            > Clayton Stirling Bartholomew
            > Three Tree Point
            > P.O. Box 255 Seahurst WA 98062
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > J_D_G_DunnSeminar-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > To contact the List Owner, send an e-mail to:
            >
            > J. D_G_DunnSeminar-owner@yahoogroups.com
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
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