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The age of the Earth and a Genesis Day

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  • a_measured_brush
    How long is a day in the first chapter of Genesis? Does the Bible say how old the earth Is? Point of View When examining the Genesis account, it is helpful
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 13, 2007
      How long is a "day" in the first chapter of Genesis? Does the Bible say how old the earth Is?

      Point of View

      When examining the Genesis account, it is helpful to keep in mind that it approaches matters from the standpoint of people on earth. So it describes events as they would have been seen by human observers had they been present. This can be noted from its treatment of events on the fourth Genesis "day." There the sun and moon are described as great luminaries in comparison to the stars. Yet many stars are far greater than our sun, and the moon is insignificant in comparison to them. But not to an earthly observer. So, as seen from the earth, the sun appears to be a `greater light that rules the day' and the moon a `lesser light that dominates the night.'—Genesis 1:14-18.

      What Does the Hebrew word for "Day" mean?

      The Hebrew word yohm, translated "day," can mean different lengths of time. Among the meanings possible, William Wilson's Old Testament Word Studies includes the following: "A day; it is frequently put for time in general, or for a long time; a whole period under consideration . . . Day is also put for a particular season or time when any extraordinary event happens."1 This last sentence appears to fit the creative "days," for certainly they were periods when extraordinary events were described as happening. It also allows for periods much longer than 24 hours.

          That the Hebrew word for "day" is, as in English also, a flexible expression of unites of time is evident by the context of this expression in the Genesis account of creation. Therein is set forth a week of six creative days followed by a seventh day of rest.  The week assigned for observance by the Jews under the Law covenant given them by God was a miniature copy of that creative week (Ex. 20:8-ll).  That, in this instance, Moses did always mean that "day" equates twenty-four hours is the evident by: Genesis 1:5, where the daylight portion is called "day".  Genesis 2:4, where all the creative epochs together are called "the day", Genesis 5:1,2, where it mentions "the day of God's creating Adam" and "the day of their being created" (though we learned by Genesis chapter 2 that the man and woman were not created in the same twenty-four hour day).  Genesis 35:3, where Jacob refers to "the day of my distress"; Genesis 42:17,18, where Joseph puts his brothers into custody for three days (the days here are shorter than twenty-four hours); and in Psalms 90:2,4, also written by Moses, which says "For a thousand years are in your eyes but as yesterday when it is past, and as a watch during the night."  Also when considering the topic of the length of the creative days we should consider: 1) What did each day begin with? 2) What did each day end with? and 3) What does the rest of the Bible have to say on this subject?

      What each Day began and ended with

          Each day began with a pronouncement or statement by God of his purpose for that particular day.  Thus day 1 began at Genesis 1:3; day 1 at Genesis 1:6; day 3 at Genesis 1:9; day 4 at Genesis 1:14; day 5 at Genesis 1:20; day six at Genesis 1:24; and say seven at Genesis 2:3.  What can we discern so far?  The creative days were an account of the stages of God's actions toward the earth, which he had already created as he had also the remainder of the universe referred to in Genesis 1:1 as "the heavens", for this period of six "days" concerned the preparation of the planet existing in the state described in Genesis 1:2 as being "formless and waste" and there being darkness over the water covered surface, so it would be suitable for and filled with life.  Thus even if we knew the length of the creative days the Bible does not indicate either the age of the earth or of the universe because to mention this again for emphasis, the "heavens and the earth" were created before the first day.

          What does each creative day end with, and what else does the Bible say on this subject?  In the historical account of Genesis at the end of each day we find the expression "and there came to the evening and there came to the morning," and then the day number following this statement.  So then day 1 ended at Genesis 1:5, day 2 at Genesis 1:8, day 3 at Genesis 1:13, day 4 at Genesis 1:19, day 5 at Genesis 1:23, day 6 at Genesis 1:31, and day 7 did not have an end.  Since it is a reasonable conclusion that he days of the creation account are of equal length, we can gain understanding of the issue of the length of the creative days by considering the length of the seventh day.  At Hebrews 4:1-10, Paul quotes from Psalm 95:11 to demonstrate that the Israelites of Moses' day had the opportunity to enter into God's day of rest, but these failed to do so because of their lack of faith, and disobedience, and he then indicates that Christians of his time still had the opportunity to do so because that seventh day was still continuing.  So the conclusion this leads to is that the seventh day is thousands of years long and thus the other days would be as long also. 

      A Reasonable View

      In English  usage we might say "In my father's day" or something similar such as "In George Washington's day."  Other people will understand what we mean by such idioms containing the word "day" according to the context, whether we are speaking in a literal or figurative way, but prejudice cause individuals to insist on a literal  interpretation of certain Bible texts, before they ascertain all the facts, or regardless of them.  Some individuals consider it an evidence of their "faith" if they readily accept what others may find to be unreasonable without studying everything the Bible has to say on the subject. On the other hand individuals who are looking for something to criticize in the Bible also insist on a literal interpretation even though they would not do so if hearing something similar in everyday conversation.

      A Look at the Text

      Genesis

      1

      In [the] beginning God created the heavens and the earth.

      2

       Now the earth proved to be formless and waste and there was darkness upon the surface of [the] watery deep; and God's active force was moving to and fro over the surface of the waters.

      3

       And God proceeded to say: "Let light come to be." Then there came to be light. 4 After that God saw that the light was good, and God brought about a division between the light and the darkness. 5 And God began calling the light Day, but the darkness he called Night. And there came to be evening and there came to be morning, a first day.

      (The first day began with verse three for the reasons stated above.)

       

      So no, the Bible doesn't say old the earth is, or how old the universe is either. All of "the Heavens and the Earth" were created before the first creative day, each of the creative days were thousands of years, or so, in duration, and the events during each of those days happened gradually, and not suddenly, as if, some would claim, "the waving of a magic wand".

      Does the fossil record support this view?

      Gerald Schroeder, a former professor of nuclear physics, writes: "The Bible relates in thirty-one verses, in a few hundred words, events spanning sixteen billion years.  These are events about which scientists have written literally millions of words.  The entire development of animal life is summarized in eight biblical sentences.  Considering the brevity of the biblical narrative, the match between the statements and timing in Genesis 1 and the discoveries of modern science is phenomenal, especially when we realize that all biblical interpretation used here was recorded centuries even millennia, in the past and so was not in any way influenced by the discover8ies of modern science.  It is modern science that has come to match the biblical account of our Genesis."  - The Science Of God - The Convergence Of Scientific And Biblical Wisdom.'

      Those who claim that the creative days were literal will point to the expression "and there came to be evening and there came to be morning" to support this claim. I'll address it in some detail in another message.

    • Steve Klemetti
      ... The point of view was from Moses. And there came to be evening and there came to be morning, a first day. He saw a vision of the creative process. Then
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 13, 2007
        a_measured_brush wrote:
        > How long is a "day" in the first chapter of Genesis? Does the Bible
        > say how old the earth Is?
        >
        > Point of View
        >
        > When examining the Genesis account, it is helpful to keep in mind that
        > it approaches matters from the standpoint of people on earth. So it
        > describes events as they would have been seen by human observers had
        > they been present. This can be noted from its treatment of events on
        > the fourth Genesis "day." There the sun and moon are described as
        > great luminaries in comparison to the stars. Yet many stars are far
        > greater than our sun, and the moon is insignificant in comparison to
        > them. But not to an earthly observer. So, as seen from the earth, the
        > sun appears to be a `greater light that rules the day' and the moon a
        > `lesser light that dominates the night.'—Genesis 1:14-18.
        >
        The point of view was from Moses. "And there came to be evening and
        there came to be morning, a first day."

        He saw a vision of the creative process. Then the process ended with
        darkness. (the evening) and the the new process
        started with light (the morning), then he marked the day. He said "Day"
        because it appeared to be a day to him.
        Thus there is no specific time length and does not need to be consistant
        with the rest and not 24 hours.
      • mark connell
        my day is 24hrs, Big Boss 1000yrs a_measured_brush wrote: How long is a day in the first chapter of Genesis? Does the Bible
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 13, 2007
          my day is 24hrs, Big Boss 1000yrs

          a_measured_brush <bambootiger@...> wrote:
          How long is a "day" in the first chapter of Genesis? Does the Bible say how old the earth Is?
          Point of View
          When examining the Genesis account, it is helpful to keep in mind that it approaches matters from the standpoint of people on earth. So it describes events as they would have been seen by human observers had they been present. This can be noted from its treatment of events on the fourth Genesis "day." There the sun and moon are described as great luminaries in comparison to the stars. Yet many stars are far greater than our sun, and the moon is insignificant in comparison to them. But not to an earthly observer. So, as seen from the earth, the sun appears to be a `greater light that rules the day' and the moon a `lesser light that dominates the night.'—Genesis 1:14-18.
          What Does the Hebrew word for "Day" mean?
          The Hebrew word yohm, translated "day," can mean different lengths of time. Among the meanings possible, William Wilson's Old Testament Word Studies includes the following: "A day; it is frequently put for time in general, or for a long time; a whole period under consideration . . . Day is also put for a particular season or time when any extraordinary event happens."1 This last sentence appears to fit the creative "days," for certainly they were periods when extraordinary events were described as happening. It also allows for periods much longer than 24 hours.
              That the Hebrew word for "day" is, as in English also, a flexible expression of unites of time is evident by the context of this expression in the Genesis account of creation. Therein is set forth a week of six creative days followed by a seventh day of rest.  The week assigned for observance by the Jews under the Law covenant given them by God was a miniature copy of that creative week (Ex. 20:8-ll).  That, in this instance, Moses did always mean that "day" equates twenty-four hours is the evident by: Genesis 1:5, where the daylight portion is called "day".  Genesis 2:4, where all the creative epochs together are called "the day", Genesis 5:1,2, where it mentions "the day of God's creating Adam" and "the day of their being created" (though we learned by Genesis chapter 2 that the man and woman were not created in the same twenty-four hour day).  Genesis 35:3, where Jacob refers to "the day of my distress"; Genesis 42:17,18, where Joseph puts his brothers into custody for three days (the days here are shorter than twenty-four hours); and in Psalms 90:2,4, also written by Moses, which says "For a thousand years are in your eyes but as yesterday when it is past, and as a watch during the night."  Also when considering the topic of the length of the creative days we should consider: 1) What did each day begin with? 2) What did each day end with? and 3) What does the rest of the Bible have to say on this subject?
          What each Day began and ended with
              Each day began with a pronouncement or statement by God of his purpose for that particular day.  Thus day 1 began at Genesis 1:3; day 1 at Genesis 1:6; day 3 at Genesis 1:9; day 4 at Genesis 1:14; day 5 at Genesis 1:20; day six at Genesis 1:24; and say seven at Genesis 2:3.  What can we discern so far?  The creative days were an account of the stages of God's actions toward the earth, which he had already created as he had also the remainder of the universe referred to in Genesis 1:1 as "the heavens", for this period of six "days" concerned the preparation of the planet existing in the state described in Genesis 1:2 as being "formless and waste" and there being darkness over the water covered surface, so it would be suitable for and filled with life.  Thus even if we knew the length of the creative days the Bible does not indicate either the age of the earth or of the universe because to mention this again for emphasis, the "heavens and the earth" were created before the first day.
              What does each creative day end with, and what else does the Bible say on this subject?  In the historical account of Genesis at the end of each day we find the expression "and there came to the evening and there came to the morning," and then the day number following this statement.  So then day 1 ended at Genesis 1:5, day 2 at Genesis 1:8, day 3 at Genesis 1:13, day 4 at Genesis 1:19, day 5 at Genesis 1:23, day 6 at Genesis 1:31, and day 7 did not have an end.  Since it is a reasonable conclusion that he days of the creation account are of equal length, we can gain understanding of the issue of the length of the creative days by considering the length of the seventh day.  At Hebrews 4:1-10, Paul quotes from Psalm 95:11 to demonstrate that the Israelites of Moses' day had the opportunity to enter into God's day of rest, but these failed to do so because of their lack of faith, and disobedience, and he then indicates that Christians of his time still had the opportunity to do so because that seventh day was still continuing.  So the conclusion this leads to is that the seventh day is thousands of years long and thus the other days would be as long also. 
          A Reasonable View
          In English  usage we might say "In my father's day" or something similar such as "In George Washington's day."  Other people will understand what we mean by such idioms containing the word "day" according to the context, whether we are speaking in a literal or figurative way, but prejudice cause individuals to insist on a literal  interpretation of certain Bible texts, before they ascertain all the facts, or regardless of them.  Some individuals consider it an evidence of their "faith" if they readily accept what others may find to be unreasonable without studying everything the Bible has to say on the subject. On the other hand individuals who are looking for something to criticize in the Bible also insist on a literal interpretation even though they would not do so if hearing something similar in everyday conversation.
          A Look at the Text
          Genesis
          1
          In [the] beginning God created the heavens and the earth.
          2
           Now the earth proved to be formless and waste and there was darkness upon the surface of [the] watery deep; and God's active force was moving to and fro over the surface of the waters.
          3
           And God proceeded to say: "Let light come to be." Then there came to be light. 4 After that God saw that the light was good, and God brought about a division between the light and the darkness. 5 And God began calling the light Day, but the darkness he called Night. And there came to be evening and there came to be morning, a first day.
          (The first day began with verse three for the reasons stated above.)
           
          So no, the Bible doesn't say old the earth is, or how old the universe is either. All of "the Heavens and the Earth" were created before the first creative day, each of the creative days were thousands of years, or so, in duration, and the events during each of those days happened gradually, and not suddenly, as if, some would claim, "the waving of a magic wand".
          Does the fossil record support this view?
          Gerald Schroeder, a former professor of nuclear physics, writes: "The Bible relates in thirty-one verses, in a few hundred words, events spanning sixteen billion years.  These are events about which scientists have written literally millions of words.  The entire development of animal life is summarized in eight biblical sentences.  Considering the brevity of the biblical narrative, the match between the statements and timing in Genesis 1 and the discoveries of modern science is phenomenal, especially when we realize that all biblical interpretation used here was recorded centuries even millennia, in the past and so was not in any way influenced by the discover8ies of modern science.  It is modern science that has come to match the biblical account of our Genesis."  - The Science Of God - The Convergence Of Scientific And Biblical Wisdom.'
          Those who claim that the creative days were literal will point to the expression "and there came to be evening and there came to be morning" to support this claim. I'll address it in some detail in another message.
        • a_measured_brush
          In the creative days evening is mentioned first. and then the day progresses to morning. If we were to take this literally then the question arises of Where
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 13, 2007

             

            In the creative days evening is mentioned first. and then the day progresses to morning. If we were to take this literally then the question arises of "Where is the rest of the day?" The way that the Hebrews observed their day was patterned after this account. They began their day after sundown, and the day didn't end the next morning, but rather it continued on until the next evening. So what is the significance of a Genesis "Day" consisting of only "evening' and "morning"? 

            This is not an exhaustive list, but consider how the Bible refers to darkness and light in a symbolic sense:

            (Job 12:22) 22 He is uncovering deep things from the darkness, And he brings forth to the light deep shadow;

            (Job 12:25) 25 They grope in darkness, where there is no light, That he may make them wander about like a drunken man.

            (Psalm 82:5)  5 They have not known, and they do not understand; In darkness they keep walking about; All the foundations of the earth are made to totter.

            (Psalm 107:10) 10 There were those dwelling in darkness and deep shadow, Prisoners in affliction and irons.

            (Psalm 107:14) 14 He went bringing them out from darkness and deep shadow, And tearing even their bands apart.

            (Psalm 112:4)  4 He has flashed up in the darkness as a light to the upright ones.. .

             .(Psalm 119:105) 105 Your word is a lamp to my foot, And a light to my roadway.

            (Proverbs 2:13) 13 from those leaving the paths of uprightness to walk in the ways of darkness,

            (Ecclesiastes 2:14) 14 As regards anyone wise, his eyes are in his head; but the stupid one is walking on in sheer darkness. . . .

            (Isaiah 9:2)  2 The people that were walking in the darkness have seen a great light. As for those dwelling in the land of deep shadow, light itself has shone upon them.

            (Isaiah 60:2-3) 2 For, look! darkness itself will cover the earth, and thick gloom the national groups; but upon you Jehovah will shine forth, and upon you his own glory will be seen. 3 And nations will certainly go to your light, and kings to the brightness of your shining forth.

            (Daniel 2:22) 22 He is revealing the deep things and the concealed things, knowing what is in the darkness; and with him the light does dwell.

            (Matthew 6:22-23) 22 "The lamp of the body is the eye. If, then, your eye is simple, your whole body will be bright; 23 but if your eye is wicked, your whole body will be dark. If in reality the light that is in you is darkness, how great that darkness is!

            Each creative time period began with a sense of mystery, as far as observers (the spirit sons of God) were concerned, they were in a symbolic darkness as to what Jehovah would do that day, and so first they waited for Jehovah's pronouncement of his purpose, and then they waited and watched to see how he worked out that stated purpose, and while they witnessed this the light of their mental perception and of their understanding increased until God's work was done and those observers were in the "morning" , or in other words they were fully enlightened as to God's purpose: what it was, and how he worked it out.

          • Paul Leonard
            For the Big Boss 1000 years can also be 1/6th of a day or 4 hours. (Psalm 90:4) 4 For a thousand years are in your eyes but as yesterday when it is past,
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 14, 2007
              For the "Big Boss"   1000 years can also be 1/6th of a day or 4 hours.

              (Psalm 90:4) 4 For a thousand years are in your eyes but as yesterday when it is past, And as a watch during the night.

              His "Day" and ours is very different.



              mark connell <connell_123@...> wrote:
              my day is 24hrs, Big Boss 1000yrs

              a_measured_brush <bambootiger@ msn.com> wrote:
              How long is a "day" in the first chapter of Genesis? Does the Bible say how old the earth Is?
              Point of View
              When examining the Genesis account, it is helpful to keep in mind that it approaches matters from the standpoint of people on earth. So it describes events as they would have been seen by human observers had they been present. This can be noted from its treatment of events on the fourth Genesis "day." There the sun and moon are described as great luminaries in comparison to the stars. Yet many stars are far greater than our sun, and the moon is insignificant in comparison to them. But not to an earthly observer. So, as seen from the earth, the sun appears to be a `greater light that rules the day' and the moon a `lesser light that dominates the night.'—Genesis 1:14-18.
              What Does the Hebrew word for "Day" mean?
              The Hebrew word yohm, translated "day," can mean different lengths of time. Among the meanings possible, William Wilson's Old Testament Word Studies includes the following: "A day; it is frequently put for time in general, or for a long time; a whole period under consideration . . . Day is also put for a particular season or time when any extraordinary event happens."1 This last sentence appears to fit the creative "days," for certainly they were periods when extraordinary events were described as happening. It also allows for periods much longer than 24 hours.
                  That the Hebrew word for "day" is, as in English also, a flexible expression of unites of time is evident by the context of this expression in the Genesis account of creation. Therein is set forth a week of six creative days followed by a seventh day of rest.  The week assigned for observance by the Jews under the Law covenant given them by God was a miniature copy of that creative week (Ex. 20:8-ll).  That, in this instance, Moses did always mean that "day" equates twenty-four hours is the evident by: Genesis 1:5, where the daylight portion is called "day".  Genesis 2:4, where all the creative epochs together are called "the day", Genesis 5:1,2, where it mentions "the day of God's creating Adam" and "the day of their being created" (though we learned by Genesis chapter 2 that the man and woman were not created in the same twenty-four hour day).  Genesis 35:3, where Jacob refers to "the day of my distress"; Genesis 42:17,18, where Joseph puts his brothers into custody for three days (the days here are shorter than twenty-four hours); and in Psalms 90:2,4, also written by Moses, which says "For a thousand years are in your eyes but as yesterday when it is past, and as a watch during the night."  Also when considering the topic of the length of the creative days we should consider: 1) What did each day begin with? 2) What did each day end with? and 3) What does the rest of the Bible have to say on this subject?
              What each Day began and ended with
                  Each day began with a pronouncement or statement by God of his purpose for that particular day.  Thus day 1 began at Genesis 1:3; day 1 at Genesis 1:6; day 3 at Genesis 1:9; day 4 at Genesis 1:14; day 5 at Genesis 1:20; day six at Genesis 1:24; and say seven at Genesis 2:3.  What can we discern so far?  The creative days were an account of the stages of God's actions toward the earth, which he had already created as he had also the remainder of the universe referred to in Genesis 1:1 as "the heavens", for this period of six "days" concerned the preparation of the planet existing in the state described in Genesis 1:2 as being "formless and waste" and there being darkness over the water covered surface, so it would be suitable for and filled with life.  Thus even if we knew the length of the creative days the Bible does not indicate either the age of the earth or of the universe because to mention this again for emphasis, the "heavens and the earth" were created before the first day.
                  What does each creative day end with, and what else does the Bible say on this subject?  In the historical account of Genesis at the end of each day we find the expression "and there came to the evening and there came to the morning," and then the day number following this statement.  So then day 1 ended at Genesis 1:5, day 2 at Genesis 1:8, day 3 at Genesis 1:13, day 4 at Genesis 1:19, day 5 at Genesis 1:23, day 6 at Genesis 1:31, and day 7 did not have an end.  Since it is a reasonable conclusion that he days of the creation account are of equal length, we can gain understanding of the issue of the length of the creative days by considering the length of the seventh day.  At Hebrews 4:1-10, Paul quotes from Psalm 95:11 to demonstrate that the Israelites of Moses' day had the opportunity to enter into God's day of rest, but these failed to do so because of their lack of faith, and disobedience, and he then indicates that Christians of his time still had the opportunity to do so because that seventh day was still continuing.  So the conclusion this leads to is that the seventh day is thousands of years long and thus the other days would be as long also. 
              A Reasonable View
              In English  usage we might say "In my father's day" or something similar such as "In George Washington's day."  Other people will understand what we mean by such idioms containing the word "day" according to the context, whether we are speaking in a literal or figurative way, but prejudice cause individuals to insist on a literal  interpretation of certain Bible texts, before they ascertain all the facts, or regardless of them.  Some individuals consider it an evidence of their "faith" if they readily accept what others may find to be unreasonable without studying everything the Bible has to say on the subject. On the other hand individuals who are looking for something to criticize in the Bible also insist on a literal interpretation even though they would not do so if hearing something similar in everyday conversation.
              A Look at the Text
              Genesis
              1 In [the] beginning God created the heavens and the earth.
              2 Now the earth proved to be formless and waste and there was darkness upon the surface of [the] watery deep; and God's active force was moving to and fro over the surface of the waters.
              3 And God proceeded to say: "Let light come to be." Then there came to be light. 4 After that God saw that the light was good, and God brought about a division between the light and the darkness. 5 And God began calling the light Day, but the darkness he called Night. And there came to be evening and there came to be morning, a first day.
              (The first day began with verse three for the reasons stated above.)
               
              So no, the Bible doesn't say old the earth is, or how old the universe is either. All of "the Heavens and the Earth" were created before the first creative day, each of the creative days were thousands of years, or so, in duration, and the events during each of those days happened gradually, and not suddenly, as if, some would claim, "the waving of a magic wand".
              Does the fossil record support this view?
              Gerald Schroeder, a former professor of nuclear physics, writes: "The Bible relates in thirty-one verses, in a few hundred words, events spanning sixteen billion years.  These are events about which scientists have written literally millions of words.  The entire development of animal life is summarized in eight biblical sentences.  Considering the brevity of the biblical narrative, the match between the statements and timing in Genesis 1 and the discoveries of modern science is phenomenal, especially when we realize that all biblical interpretation used here was recorded centuries even millennia, in the past and so was not in any way influenced by the discover8ies of modern science.  It is modern science that has come to match the biblical account of our Genesis."  - The Science Of God - The Convergence Of Scientific And Biblical Wisdom.'
              Those who claim that the creative days were literal will point to the expression "and there came to be evening and there came to be morning" to support this claim. I'll address it in some detail in another message.

            • connell_123
              ... regardless, u explaining that black is black and white is white, remember the EXAMPLE OF A/PAUL, SHAKE THE DUST OFF YOUR BOOTS... OTHERwords don t through
              Message 6 of 6 , Jul 15, 2007
                --- you covered the point well, people want What they want,
                regardless, u explaining that black is black and white is white,
                remember the EXAMPLE OF A/PAUL, SHAKE THE DUST OFF YOUR BOOTS...

                OTHERwords don't through pearls before a swine. In
                JWquestions-and_answers@yahoogroups.com, Paul Leonard
                <anotherpaul2001@...> wrote:
                >
                > For the "Big Boss" 1000 years can also be 1/6th of a day or 4 hours.
                >
                > (Psalm 90:4) 4 For a thousand years are in your eyes but as
                yesterday when it is past, And as a watch during the night.
                >
                > His "Day" and ours is very different.
                >
                >
                >
                > mark connell <connell_123@...> wrote:
                my day is 24hrs, Big Boss 1000yrs
                >
                > a_measured_brush <bambootiger@...> wrote:
                > How long is a "day" in the first chapter of Genesis? Does the
                Bible say how old the earth Is? Point of View
                > When examining the Genesis account, it is helpful to keep in mind
                that it approaches matters from the standpoint of people on earth. So
                it describes events as they would have been seen by human observers
                had they been present. This can be noted from its treatment of events
                on the fourth Genesis "day." There the sun and moon are described as
                great luminaries in comparison to the stars. Yet many stars are far
                greater than our sun, and the moon is insignificant in comparison to
                them. But not to an earthly observer. So, as seen from the earth, the
                sun appears to be a `greater light that rules the day' and the moon a
                `lesser light that dominates the night.'—Genesis 1:14-18.
                > What Does the Hebrew word for "Day" mean?
                > The Hebrew word yohm, translated "day," can mean different lengths
                of time. Among the meanings possible, William Wilson's Old Testament
                Word Studies includes the following: "A day; it is frequently put for
                time in general, or for a long time; a whole period under
                consideration . . . Day is also put for a particular season or time
                when any extraordinary event happens."1 This last sentence appears to
                fit the creative "days," for certainly they were periods when
                extraordinary events were described as happening. It also allows for
                periods much longer than 24 hours.
                >
                > That the Hebrew word for "day" is, as in English also, a
                flexible expression of unites of time is evident by the context of
                this expression in the Genesis account of creation. Therein is set
                forth a week of six creative days followed by a seventh day of rest.
                The week assigned for observance by the Jews under the Law covenant
                given them by God was a miniature copy of that creative week (Ex.
                20:8-ll). That, in this instance, Moses did always mean that "day"
                equates twenty-four hours is the evident by: Genesis 1:5, where the
                daylight portion is called "day". Genesis 2:4, where all the creative
                epochs together are called "the day", Genesis 5:1,2, where it
                mentions "the day of God's creating Adam" and "the day of their being
                created" (though we learned by Genesis chapter 2 that the man and
                woman were not created in the same twenty-four hour day). Genesis
                35:3, where Jacob refers to "the day of my distress"; Genesis
                42:17,18, where Joseph puts his brothers into
                > custody for three days (the days here are shorter than twenty-four
                hours); and in Psalms 90:2,4, also written by Moses, which says "For a
                thousand years are in your eyes but as yesterday when it is past, and
                as a watch during the night." Also when considering the topic of the
                length of the creative days we should consider: 1) What did each day
                begin with? 2) What did each day end with? and 3) What does the rest
                of the Bible have to say on this subject?
                > What each Day began and ended with
                > Each day began with a pronouncement or statement by God of
                his purpose for that particular day. Thus day 1 began at Genesis 1:3;
                day 1 at Genesis 1:6; day 3 at Genesis 1:9; day 4 at Genesis 1:14; day
                5 at Genesis 1:20; day six at Genesis 1:24; and say seven at Genesis
                2:3. What can we discern so far? The creative days were an account
                of the stages of God's actions toward the earth, which he had already
                created as he had also the remainder of the universe referred to in
                Genesis 1:1 as "the heavens", for this period of six "days" concerned
                the preparation of the planet existing in the state described in
                Genesis 1:2 as being "formless and waste" and there being darkness
                over the water covered surface, so it would be suitable for and filled
                with life. Thus even if we knew the length of the creative days the
                Bible does not indicate either the age of the earth or of the universe
                because to mention this again for emphasis, the "heavens and the
                earth" were created
                > before the first day.
                > What does each creative day end with, and what else does the
                Bible say on this subject? In the historical account of Genesis at
                the end of each day we find the expression "and there came to the
                evening and there came to the morning," and then the day number
                following this statement. So then day 1 ended at Genesis 1:5, day 2
                at Genesis 1:8, day 3 at Genesis 1:13, day 4 at Genesis 1:19, day 5 at
                Genesis 1:23, day 6 at Genesis 1:31, and day 7 did not have an end.
                Since it is a reasonable conclusion that he days of the creation
                account are of equal length, we can gain understanding of the issue of
                the length of the creative days by considering the length of the
                seventh day. At Hebrews 4:1-10, Paul quotes from Psalm 95:11 to
                demonstrate that the Israelites of Moses' day had the opportunity to
                enter into God's day of rest, but these failed to do so because of
                their lack of faith, and disobedience, and he then indicates that
                Christians of his time still had the
                > opportunity to do so because that seventh day was still continuing.
                So the conclusion this leads to is that the seventh day is thousands
                of years long and thus the other days would be as long also.
                > A Reasonable View
                > In English usage we might say "In my father's day" or something
                similar such as "In George Washington's day." Other people will
                understand what we mean by such idioms containing the word "day"
                according to the context, whether we are speaking in a literal or
                figurative way, but prejudice cause individuals to insist on a literal
                interpretation of certain Bible texts, before they ascertain all the
                facts, or regardless of them. Some individuals consider it an
                evidence of their "faith" if they readily accept what others may find
                to be unreasonable without studying everything the Bible has to say on
                the subject. On the other hand individuals who are looking for
                something to criticize in the Bible also insist on a literal
                interpretation even though they would not do so if hearing something
                similar in everyday conversation.
                > A Look at the Text
                > Genesis
                > 1 In [the] beginning God created the heavens and the earth.
                > 2 Now the earth proved to be formless and waste and there was
                darkness upon the surface of [the] watery deep; and God's active force
                was moving to and fro over the surface of the waters.
                > 3 And God proceeded to say: "Let light come to be." Then there
                came to be light. 4 After that God saw that the light was good, and
                God brought about a division between the light and the darkness. 5 And
                God began calling the light Day, but the darkness he called Night. And
                there came to be evening and there came to be morning, a first day.
                > (The first day began with verse three for the reasons stated above.)
                >
                > So no, the Bible doesn't say old the earth is, or how old the
                universe is either. All of "the Heavens and the Earth" were created
                before the first creative day, each of the creative days were
                thousands of years, or so, in duration, and the events during each of
                those days happened gradually, and not suddenly, as if, some would
                claim, "the waving of a magic wand".
                > Does the fossil record support this view?
                > Gerald Schroeder, a former professor of nuclear physics, writes:
                "The Bible relates in thirty-one verses, in a few hundred words,
                events spanning sixteen billion years. These are events about which
                scientists have written literally millions of words. The entire
                development of animal life is summarized in eight biblical sentences.
                Considering the brevity of the biblical narrative, the match between
                the statements and timing in Genesis 1 and the discoveries of modern
                science is phenomenal, especially when we realize that all biblical
                interpretation used here was recorded centuries even millennia, in the
                past and so was not in any way influenced by the discover8ies of
                modern science. It is modern science that has come to match the
                biblical account of our Genesis." - The Science Of God - The
                Convergence Of Scientific And Biblical Wisdom.'
                >
                > Those who claim that the creative days were literal will point to
                the expression "and there came to be evening and there came to be
                morning" to support this claim. I'll address it in some detail in
                another message.
                >
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