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  • SusanneLevitsky@aol.com
    Jewish Genealogical Society of Sacramento www.jgss.org September 18, 2006 Program From Shtetl to Hester Street Monday, September 18, 7 p.m. How did your
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 10 12:40 PM
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      Jewish Genealogical Society

      of Sacramento

       

      www.jgss.org

       

       

      September 18, 2006 Program

       

      "From Shtetl to Hester Street"

      Monday, September 18, 7 p.m.

       

      How did your relatives make their way to a new life in America?  The September meeting of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Sacramento will focus on how Jewish immigrants traveled from Eastern Europe to America.  Many left from the ports of Hamburg, Bremen, Rotterdam and Lipari. Hear from Allan Bonderoff about the various routes they took for their journeys before embarking on a new life in this country.

       

      The meeting will also include a report from Art Yates who attended the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies conference in July.   Art will share the latest in online databases,  research efforts and more gleaned at the New York conference. 

       

      Please join us Monday evening, September 18.

       

      - - - - - - - - - -

       

       “There’s an immigrant historian – [Marcus Hansen] – who is famous for saying, ‘What the children of immigrants want to forget, the grandchildren of immigrants want to remember,’” -- Genealogist Arthur Kurzweil.

      - - - - - - - - - -

       

      New Polish Web Site

      From Avotaynu: Tomasz Wisniewski of Bialystok, Poland has developed yet another site about Polish Jewry. It is located at http://www.bagnowka.com/. Browse the sections on cemeteries, World War II and wooden architecture. Bagnowka is the section of Bialystok that contains the largest Jewish cemetery.

       

      Bus Trip to Sutro, Nat'l Archives

       

      The GAS bus trip to the Sutro Genealogy Library and the National Archives is coming up Wednesday, October 25.  The bus  leaves Sacramento between 7 a.m. and 7:30 a.m., depending on your boarding  location.  Plan on getting home between 7 p.m. and 8 p.m.  Cost is $25  for GAS members and $30 for non-members.  Please call or e-mail Sharon Bias if you want to make a reservation.  Mail your checks, made out to "GAS" to the address below. 

      Sharon G. Bias, P.O. Box 1725,North Highlands CA 95660; (916) 481-4413 work; (916) 991-3161 home; sgbelverta@....

       

       

      Upcoming Meeting Dates

       

      Monday, October 16, 7 p.m.

      Mark Heckman  -- Travels in Ukraine -- the 2006 Czernowitz Reunion

       

      Sunday, November 19, 10 a.m.

      Ron Arons -- Techniques for Using the Internet

       

      Sunday, December 10, 10 a.m.

      Reva Camiel -- Family Videotaping Production

       

       

      Below, a Few Articles That May Be of Interest…

       

       

      (08/25/2006)  New York Jewish Week

      Building A Jewish Family Tree

      At annual genealogy conference

      Carolyn Slutsky - Staff Writer
      Amateur genealogists gather last week at the resource center at the Marriott Marquis to try to discover their roots. Courtesy of International Association of Jewish Genealogical Society

      The two cousins met 10 years ago over chef salads in one of the cousin’s homes. But their meeting would never have happened had they not each decided to go online to peel back the layers of their family histories.

      Joy Rosnel Weaver got involved with Jewish genealogy because she was curious to find out about her family tree, whose branches were sparse and, in some places, bare.

      “I felt like I had no roots, no past,” said Weaver, 68, of
      Islip, L.I.

      She was using the Web site jewishgen.org, one of the more popular of the Internet destinations that have sprung up to trace Jewish genealogy over the past several years (others include ancestry.com and heritagequest.com). Weaver saw that a woman named Sylvia Nadel was searching for information about a name similar to the one she was researching, Rosnel, her maiden name. Weaver e-mailed Nadel and together they discovered that Nadel, of
      New Providence, N.J., was Weaver’s father’s first cousin.

      Since their first meeting, the cousins have kept in touch and visit each other at their homes when they can.

      “She’s here with me as my roommate,” said Weaver, who was volunteering at the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies’ 26th annual conference held last week at the Marriott Marquis in Midtown. IAJGS is a nonprofit umbrella organization that coordinates activities for more than 75 Jewish genealogical societies around the world.

      The six-day conference featured over 250 sessions on topics such as genetics, document research, Jewish history and computer database searching. Films about
      Eastern Europe played in screening rooms, and representatives from various Web sites and publishers helped the more than 1,400 conference-goers to search for their own families using computers and archives. Various groups met throughout the week, linking people whose family trees connected somewhere back in Poland, Lithuania, Hungary, Turkey or elsewhere. And participants ventured outside the Marriot into New York City, taking walking tours of the Lower East Side and visiting Jewish cemeteries in the outer boroughs.

      For many, the conference provided a chance to meet or reconnect with scattered family who, without the Internet and the many genealogical societies throughout the world, might remain unknown to each other forever.

      Sylvia Nadel, Weaver’s cousin, was born in
      New York City in 1921, only a year after her family immigrated from Zaklikow, Poland. A week before she was born, Nadel’s father died, and when her mother remarried two years later Nadel lost track of her father’s family, many of whom left Poland for South America. Family members floated in and out of her life but she was never able to synthesize her history for herself until she got involved in genealogy.

      As for why she is so interested in the past, Nadel speculates that it has to do with her sense of herself and her place in the world.

      “I like old houses, I like old furniture, maybe I like old people,” she said. “After the incompleteness of my own background, having no touch with my biological father’s family, I’m very family-oriented.”

      Nadel, who will be celebrating her 85th birthday next week, forced herself to learn to use the computer to aid her search for her roots.

      Her cousin, Weaver, said that for her genealogy has been a mixed experience. Some people, she said, feel, “do I really want to go back to a place where no one related to anyone is anymore? It’s sad, so sad. You hear stories about using Jewish gravestones for paving. It’s heart wrenching. Then other people say they want to walk where their ancestors walked.”

      Some people find their passion in genealogy because of a missing link to the past. Stanley Diamond’s interest stemmed from an inherited blood disorder known as beta-thalassemia that is prevalent in his family. “Because of the power of genetics, we know who we are and what we are,” said Diamond, who uncovered health records to piece together his family’s medical history.

      Some people, including Diamond, Nadel and Weaver, become their family’s default family historians and keepers of their family stories. There are those who even go so far as to plan their tombstones years in advance so that all the names they have uncovered will be listed for eternity.

      For Susan Kaplan Stone, who has been involved with Jewish genealogy for 27 years and is active in the Jewish Genealogical Society of New York, the process of uncovering one’s family unfolds like a fascinating mystery. “It’s one huge puzzle,” she said. “And it’s better than the New York Times Sunday crossword puzzle when you make a hit.”

       



      Still rooted in Fort Wayne, Indiana
      Genealogy online can’t match opportunities for family history research at library.

      With millions of Web sites, billions of names in searchable databases and downloadable family trees available online, is the genealogy department at the Allen County Public Library obsolete?

       

      That’s an important question, not only for the library, but for Fort Wayne and Allen County as a whole. The genealogy department housed in the main library is one of Fort Wayne’s top attractions for visitors. As many as 100,000 people a year come to look for clues to the identities and lives of their ancestors and other relatives.

       

      Fortunately, there’s plenty about the library that keeps it relevant in the age of digital geneaology. “A biggie is our staff resource,” said Library Director Jeff Krull. “It’s a human brain trust you’re not going to find anywhere else.”

       

      Of the 32 people employed in the genealogy department, six are staff genealogists, said Curt Witcher, manager of the department. Each of those half-dozen is well-versed in genealogical research and is an expert in at least one specialized field, such as Irish genealogy or German genealogy.

       

      Instead of feeling beleaguered by the profusion of genealogy online, Witcher sounds buoyant about the possibilities the online organizations and businesses provide. “I’m excited about the dot-coms. They’re doing a great job of marketing, the kind of marketing we could never do,” he said.

       

      Witcher noted that Ancestry says it has 65 to 90 million people visiting its site monthly. Any of those visitors, even the most novice dabbler, could be a potential visitor to Fort Wayne – the second-largest genealogy collection in the country – if he or she wants to dig beneath data available on the Internet.

       

      There’s a tremendous amount of genealogical information available offline, and Witcher expects that it will remain out of reach of the Web for a long, long time – decades, at least.  But there’s much more than census documents and state indexes of marriages on the shelves in the genealogy department. Its 332,000 printed volumes include decades of city directories from across the country, genealogy newsletters and journals and family histories compiled by researchers long before the Internet was created. It has extensive collections of Canadian, English, Scottish, Irish and German research information. And its staff knows how to help anyone from a novice to an expert negotiate the tonnage of reference materials.

       

      In fact, the popularity of online genealogy could be a direct draw for the library. Witcher pointed out that not everyone can afford subscriptions to online databases such as Ancestry’s, which cost $30 to $40 a month. However, anyone can use Ancestry and other sites through the library’s access.

       

      When the expanded and renovated library reopens early next year, it will be so much larger that all its materials will be open to visitors, instead of accessible only through pages fetching books from storage, as was the case in the old main library. There will be more space to teach small classes in genealogy, many more computer terminals and more capability to store genealogical information directly to laptops or portable thumb drives.

       

       

    • SusanneLevitsky@aol.com
      From DNA to Genetic Genealogy -- Steve Morse Monday, June 16, 2008, 7 p.m. Jewish Genealogical Society of Sacramento Genealogy guru Steve Morse, creator of
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 8, 2008
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        From DNA to Genetic Genealogy -- Steve Morse

        Monday, June 16, 2008,  7 p.m.

        Jewish Genealogical Society of Sacramento

         


        Genealogy guru Steve Morse, creator of the one-step approach to database searching, will debut a new talk in June -- “From DNA to Genetic Genealogy -- Everything you wanted to know but were afraid to ask.” Members of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Sacramento -- and interested guests --  will be the first to hear Steve’s presentation of this subject.

         

        The study of genetics that started with Gregor Mendel's pea experiments in 1865 has now entered the genealogy field with the coining of the term "genetealogy" in 2000.  To understand the genealogical aspects requires an understanding of some of the basic concepts.

        This talk introduces genes, chromosomes, and DNA, and goes on to show how DNA is inherited.  That knowledge of inheritance can be used for finding relatives you didn't know you had, learning about your very distant ancestors and the route they traveled, and determining if you are a Jewish high priest (Kohan).

        Before we hear from Steve, we’ll hear from briefly from Reuven Singer, project coordinator for the  IASI Romania Burial Records Project.  After extensive negotiations, he obtained and photographed some 3600 pages of burial records from the Jewish community of
        IASI form 1883 to 1966.

         

        He will have arrived in Sacramento from Jerusaluem the night before. A physician, he’ll be working for the next six weeks in Modesto.

         

         

        Marysville Cemetery Dedication June 29

         

        The Commission for the Preservation of Pioneer Jewish Cemeteries & Landmarks in the West,
        a Trust of the Judah Magnes Museum, invites you to the dedication of the Entry Gates (from the late 19th century), and continuing restoration of the Marysville Pioneer Jewish Cemetery.  The dedication will be held Sunday, June 29

        Agenda

        11 a.m. at Congregation Beth Shalom, Marysville, CA, for coffee  (315 First Street, Marysville),

        11:30 a.m.at the Marysville Pioneer Hebrew Cemetery for dedication

        12:30 p.m.Luncheon & Commission Board Meeting (open and closed sessions)

        1:30 p.m.Book signing by Susan Morris of her book, "Pioneer Jewish Cemeteries of the California Gold Rush"

        2 p.m.  A Yiddish World Remembered, the award-winning documentary of the culture, observance, customs, language and experience the pioneer Jewish emigrants brought with them to this new country.

        For more information:
        Barbara Fruitman – 530-674-5104 or barbarafruitman@...
        Paul Solomon – 971-506-2905 paul@...

         

         

        From the June 1 E-Zine of Avotaynu, produced by Gary Mokotoff:

         

        London Jewish Birth Records Indexed
        Harold and Miriam Levin of Jerusalem have published a book indexing birth records of the Great and Hambro Synagogues of London (1791–1885). It lists more than 7,000 births. The cost is £29, €37 or $58. Checks may be sent to the Lewins at POB 253, Jerusalem 91002.

        The record were acquired in 1949 by the Mormon Church and can be ordered on microfilm. The microfilm numbers are:
            Great Synagogue Records: 94657–94666
            Hambro Records: 94667
            New Synagogue: 94668


        JGSGB Database Identifies Jews Living in
        UK in 1851
        The Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain has a searchable database of more than 20,000 Jews who were living in
        Great Britain in 1851. The source is primarily the 1851 census located at http://jgsgb.org.uk/1851/An_1851_Study1.asp. The database, an ongoing project, covers mainly England, Wales and Scotland with a few additions from Ireland, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man. It is estimated more than half the Jewish population at that time is represented.


        Public Member Trees on Ancestry.com
        I just discovered a database at Ancestry.com that is valuable in filling in data about more distant relatives for whom we tend to know less. It is the Public Member Trees database. This database contains family trees submitted to Ancestry by users who've indicated their tree can be viewed by all Ancestry members. I have used it to identify the names of the parents of people who married into my family as well as basic information about distant cousins. The database has the option for communicating with the submitter of the information.

        Access to this database is automatic when you search for a given person or surname. On the results page, it's in the “Family Trees” section, the last group of databases displayed.


        Hindsight: A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames from the Russian Empire
        When reading the Introductory portion of the original version of A Dictionary of Jewish S
        urnames from the Russia Empire published in 1993, I realized there was a wealth of information about the surnames mentioned in that portion of the book that could not be gleaned from the Dictionary itself. Therefore, in the Revised Edition of the book, we have included an index to the more than 5,000 surnames cited in the Introductory portion. I know that those who've purchased the new book will immediately go to the surnames of interest to see how the listing has been expanded. Be sure to also check the index to the surnames in the Introduction in volume one.

        Here are some examples of the expanded information given in the Introductory portion of the book.

        Consider a statement Dr. Beider makes in the section on Rabbinical Surnames:

        The first bearers of rabbinical surnames appeared at different times in history. In the 14th century the names Treves, Mintz and Luria arose. The 15th century saw the appearance of Margolioth, Epstein, Auerbach, Horowitz, Landau and Bacharach. In the 16th century Jaffe, Rapoport, Lipschütz, Katzenellenbogen, Günzburg, Fränkel and Morawczyk came into existence. Heilprin, Teomim, Broda and Sack date from the 17th century.


        There is an accompanying footnote:

        Without knowing the exact age and status of these surnames, one can come to wrong conclusions. For example, Max Weinreich (1973:2:97, 1980:440–441) mentioned the large frequency in Eastern Europe of surnames like Spiro/Shapiro, Minz, Landau, Heilbronn/Halper(i)n, Katzenellenbogen, Epstein, Bachrach, all derived (or believed to be derived) from the names of towns located on or near the Rhine and Main river, to illustrate his idea about the Rhenish origins of Yiddish and Ashkenazic Jewry. Nathan Süsskind (1953:106) also erroneously stated that modern common Jewish family names derived from the names of German towns demonstrate the medieval migrations from these places. These arguments are anachronistic: the cited names mainly arose in Western Europe from 1-3 centuries after the Black Death. Their bearers belonged to famous rabbinical families whose members migrated eastward even later and joined the communities already established there for several centuries.


        This item appears in the discussion of origin of Toponymic surnames:

        There is no reason to call a man who lives in Slutsk by the name Slutskij (“of Slutsk” in Russian), since all people in this place are of Slutsk. A man who migrated from Slutsk to Minsk, however, might easily acquire the name Slutskij while in Minsk.


        This item appears in the discussion of surnames derived from given names:

        Surnames derived from feminine given names may or may not have special additional elements. Those used alone were very rare in the Russian Empire, except for Lithuania: Drazne, Fejgel’, Malka, Mer’yash, Rajkhel’, Revze, Rode, Tauba, Tsive and Zisle. The most frequently used elements that appeared in Jewish metronymic surnames are Slavic suffixes. Among these are:
        1. in. Examples include Khanin, Rokhlin, Shifrin and Tsejtlin. In Ukrainian, the addition of this suffix may occur along with palatalization of a final stem consonant. Thus, the Jewish surname Soshchin is derived from the given name Soska; the nonpalatalized form is Soskin.


        Dr. Beider then continues with a list of other surnames based on feminine given names with seven other suffixes (ovich, ov, its/ich, yuk/uk, chuk, skij, enko).

        This is just a small portion of the 200-page Introduction much of which makes it fascinating reading.

         

         

        See you next Monday evening, June 16th.

         

         

         

         

         

        From DNA to Genetic Genealogy -- Steve Morse

        Monday, June 16, 2008,  7 p.m.

        Jewish Genealogical Society of Sacramento

         


        Genealogy guru Steve Morse, creator of the one-step approach to database searching, will debut a new talk in June -- “From DNA to Genetic Genealogy -- Everything you wanted to know but were afraid to ask.” Members of the Jewish Genealogical Society of Sacramento -- and interested guests --  will be the first to hear Steve’s presentation of this subject.

         

        The study of genetics that started with Gregor Mendel's pea experiments in 1865 has now entered the genealogy field with the coining of the term "genetealogy" in 2000.  To understand the genealogical aspects requires an understanding of some of the basic concepts.

        This talk introduces genes, chromosomes, and DNA, and goes on to show how DNA is inherited.  That knowledge of inheritance can be used for finding relatives you didn't know you had, learning about your very distant ancestors and the route they traveled, and determining if you are a Jewish high priest (Kohan).

        Before we hear from Steve, we’ll hear from briefly from Reuven Singer, project coordinator for the  IASI Romania Burial Records Project.  After extensive negotiations, he obtained and photographed some 3600 pages of burial records from the Jewish community of
        IASI form 1883 to 1966.

         

        He will have arrived in Sacramento from Jerusaluem the night before. A physician, he’ll be working for the next six weeks in Modesto.

         

         

        Marysville Cemetery Dedication June 29

         

        The Commission for the Preservation of Pioneer Jewish Cemeteries & Landmarks in the West,
        a Trust of the Judah Magnes Museum, invites you to the dedication of the Entry Gates (from the late 19th century), and continuing restoration of the Marysville Pioneer Jewish Cemetery.  The dedication will be held Sunday, June 29

        Agenda

        11 a.m. at Congregation Beth Shalom, Marysville, CA, for coffee  (315 First Street, Marysville),

        11:30 a.m.at the Marysville Pioneer Hebrew Cemetery for dedication

        12:30 p.m.Luncheon & Commission Board Meeting (open and closed sessions)

        1:30 p.m.Book signing by Susan Morris of her book, "Pioneer Jewish Cemeteries of the California Gold Rush"

        2 p.m.  A Yiddish World Remembered, the award-winning documentary of the culture, observance, customs, language and experience the pioneer Jewish emigrants brought with them to this new country.

        For more information:
        Barbara Fruitman – 530-674-5104 or barbarafruitman@...
        Paul Solomon – 971-506-2905 paul@...

         

         

        From the June 1 E-Zine of Avotaynu, produced by Gary Mokotoff:

         

        London Jewish Birth Records Indexed
        Harold and Miriam Levin of Jerusalem have published a book indexing birth records of the Great and Hambro Synagogues of London (1791–1885). It lists more than 7,000 births. The cost is £29, €37 or $58. Checks may be sent to the Lewins at POB 253, Jerusalem 91002.

        The record were acquired in 1949 by the Mormon Church and can be ordered on microfilm. The microfilm numbers are:
            Great Synagogue Records: 94657–94666
            Hambro Records: 94667
            New Synagogue: 94668


        JGSGB Database Identifies Jews Living in
        UK in 1851
        The Jewish Genealogical Society of Great Britain has a searchable database of more than 20,000 Jews who were living in
        Great Britain in 1851. The source is primarily the 1851 census located at http://jgsgb.org.uk/1851/An_1851_Study1.asp. The database, an ongoing project, covers mainly England, Wales and Scotland with a few additions from Ireland, the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man. It is estimated more than half the Jewish population at that time is represented.


        Public Member Trees on Ancestry.com
        I just discovered a database at Ancestry.com that is valuable in filling in data about more distant relatives for whom we tend to know less. It is the Public Member Trees database. This database contains family trees submitted to Ancestry by users who've indicat= ed their tree can be viewed by all Ancestry members. I have used it to identify the names of the parents of people who married into my family as well as basic information about distant cousins. The database has the option for communicating with the submitter of the information.

        Access to this database is automatic when you search for a given person or surname. On the results page, it's in the “Family Trees” section, the last group of databases displayed.


        Hindsight: A Dictionary of Jewish Surnames from the Russian Empire
        When reading the Introductory portion of the original version of A Dictionary of Jewish S
        urnames from the Russia Empire published in 1993, I realized there was a wealth of information about the surnames mentioned in that portion of the book that could not be gleaned from the Dictionary itself. Therefore, in the Revised Edition of the book, we have included an index to the more than 5,000 surnames cited in the Introductory portion. I know that those who've purchased the new book will immediately go to the surnames of interest to see how the listing has been expanded. Be sure to also check the index to the surnames in the Introduction in volume one.

        Here are some examples of the expanded information given in the Introductory portion of the book.

        Consider a statement Dr. Beider makes in the section on Rabbinical Surnames:

        The first bearers of rabbinical surnames appeared at different times in history. In the 14th century the names Treves, Mintz and Luria arose. The 15th century saw the appearance of Margolioth, Epstein, Auerbach, Horowitz, Landau and Bacharach. In the 16th century Jaffe, Rapoport, Lipschütz, Katzenellenbogen, Günzburg, Fränkel and Morawczyk came into existence. Heilprin, Teomim, Broda and Sack date from the 17th century.


        There is an accompanying footnote:

        Without knowing the exact age and status of these surnames, one can come to wrong conclusions. For example, Max Weinreich (1973:2:97, 1980:440–441) mentioned the large frequency in Eastern Europe of surnames like Spiro/Shapiro, Minz, Landau, Heilbronn/Halper(i)n, Katzenellenbogen, Epstein, Bachrach, all derived (or believed to be derived) from the names of towns located on or near the Rhine and Main river, to illustrate his idea about the Rhenish origins of Yiddish and Ashkenazic Jewry. Nathan Süsskind (1953:106) also erroneously stated that modern common Jewish family names derived from the names of German towns demonstrate the medieval migrations from these places. These arguments are anachronistic: the cited names mainly arose in Western Europe from 1-3 centuries after the Black Death. Their bearers belonged to famous rabbinical families whose members migrated eastward even later and joined the communities already established there for several centuries.


        This item appears in the discussion of origin of Toponymic surnames:

        There is no reason to call a man who lives in Slutsk by the name Slutskij (“of Slutsk” in Russian), since all people in this place are of Slutsk. A man who migrated from Slutsk to Minsk, however, might easily acquire the name Slutskij while in Minsk.


        This item appears in the discussion of surnames derived from given names:

        Surnames derived from feminine given names may or may not have special additional elements. Those used alone were very rare in the Russian Empire, except for Lithuania: Drazne, Fejgel’, Malka, Mer’yash, Rajkhel’, Revze, Rode, Tauba, Tsive and Zisle. The most frequently used elements that appeared in Jewish metronymic surnames are Slavic suffixes. Among these are:
        1. in. Examples include Khanin, Rokhlin, Shifrin and Tsejtlin. In Ukrainian, the addition of this suffix may occur along with palatalization of a final stem consonant. Thus, the Jewish surname Soshchin is derived from the given name Soska; the nonpalatalized form is Soskin.


        Dr. Beider then continues with a list of other surnames based on feminine given names with seven other suffixes (ovich, ov, its/ich, yuk/uk, chuk, skij, enko).

        This is just a small portion of the 200-page Introduction much of which makes it fascinating reading.

         

         

        See you next Monday evening, June 16th.

         

         

         





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