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Genealogy Update

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  • SusanneLevitsky@aol.com
    Our Next Meeting -- October 21, 10 a.m., back to Sunday schedule: Planning Your Family History Legacy -- What Happens to your Research After You re Gone?
    Message 1 of 44 , Oct 2, 2012
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      Our Next Meeting -- October 21, 10 a.m., back to Sunday schedule:
       
      "Planning Your Family History Legacy -- What Happens to your Research After You're Gone?"
       
      Patricia Burrow will get us thinking about all that genealogy material and boxes full of memorabilia.  Do your children know what to do with it all?  Patricia will talk about some of the things we can do to ensure that those family stories don't get lost again and that our research is preserved for future generations.
      Patricia retired from a Silicon Valley tech career and went on to publish a few articles about her ancestors. She's now working on a book about her adopted grandmother.  Patricia leads several genealogy groups, including an indexing project at the Santa Clara County Archives, a family surname group and a surname DNA project.  She also teaches Reunion for Mac users.
       
      JGSSer on the Stage
       
      Longtime JGSS member and past president Mark Heckman is currently appearing in a timely production of "The Best Man" by Gore Vidal for the next two weekends (Thurs-Sun).  He plays the Henry Fonda (movie) role in the Actor's Workshop of Sacramento production.  Here's a link to the dates and details:  http://www.actinsac.com/now_showing
       
       
      From Gary Mokotoff's September 30 Avotaynu E-Zine:
       
      2014 Conference Dates Announced
      For those who like to plan far ahead, the International Association of Jewish Genealogical Societies has posted to their website that the 34th International Conference on Jewish Genealogy will be held July 27–August 1, 2014, in Salt Lake City at the Hilton Salt Lake City Center, just three blocks from the Mormon Family History Center. No other particulars are available.

      The 2013 conference is in Boston from August 4
      9. Information about that conference is at http://iajgs.org/2013_Boston/2013.html.
       
      IIJG Announces Research Grants
      The International Institute for Jewish Genealogy has announced it has awarded two grants from proposals it has received for family history research. One is for a study into "Family and Kinship in the Jewish City of Piotrków Trybunalski in the 19th Century” by Tomasz Jankowski of Wroclaw, Poland. The second is to Laurence Leitenberg of Lausanne, Switzerland, who, together with Sandy Crystall of Bow, New Hampshire, USA, will create a series of "Digital Maps of Jewish Populations in Europe (1750–1930)" for online viewing.

      IIJG reports that the Jankowski work will be wholly innovative, because he proposes to use sophisticated family reconstruction techniques that have never been applied in a systematic fashion to a large Jewish community. If successful, the work will have broad implications for the genealogical reconstruction of Jewish communities. The Leitenberg-Crystall maps fall into the category of the "Tools and Technologies" which the Institute strives to produce for Jewish family historians and social scientists generally.

      Status of Various Freedom of Information Activities in the U.S.
      Jan Meisels Allen, IAJGS vice president and chair of its Public Records Access Monitoring Committee, provides an update re access to government records important to family history research.

      Six bills before Congress regarding the Social Security Death Index (Death Master File) have not been acted on, and Congress has adjourned until after the elections. If the bills aren't passed by the time the new Congress is seated in January, they'll die and have to be reintroduced. All these bills limit access to the SSDI in some way.

      Laws at the state level which restrict access are being challenged, Allen reports. The State of Virginia recently passed a law that includes provisions of its state public disclosure law that allows only its own residents access rights to public records. This is now being challenged in federal courts. Information can be found at http://tinyurl.com/99emf8o. Some states no longer provide cause of death on death certificates, something important to family medical history. Such a law is being challenged in Indiana. An article about the topic can be viewed at http://tinyurl.com/8dm3xz5
       
       
      See you Sunday morning, October 21!
       
    • SusanneLevitsky@...
      April 22, 2015 Upcoming Meetings Sunday, April 26, 10 a.m. -- JGSS Board Meeting, Card Room, 2nd Floor. All are welcome to attend. Sunday, May 10, 10 a.m. --
      Message 44 of 44 , Apr 22
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        April 22, 2015
        Upcoming Meetings
        Sunday, April 26, 10 a.m. -- JGSS Board Meeting, Card Room, 2nd Floor. All are welcome to attend.
        Sunday, May 10, 10 a.m. -- "Using Genetic Genealogy to Break Through Brick Walls in Your Family Tree," -- Jonathan Long
         
        April 19 Meeting Notes
         
        The meeting was called to order by Librarian Teven Laxer. Teven handed out information on the Southern California Genealogical Society's Jamboree and its webinars.  On Sunday, June 7, there will be five speakers focusing on "Researching Jewish, Russian and Eastern European Roots."
        The jamboree is being held at the Los Angeles Marriott Burbank Hotel. There is an early bird discount for the jamboree until April 30.  For details, go to www.genealogyjamboree.com.
        Teven noted that a Yom HaShoah commemoration will be held at B'nai Israel this evening at 7 p.m.
        Our next meeting will be held on May 10 (also Mother's Day), with Jonathan Long providing a different take on DNA research
        All are welcome to attend next Sunday's JGSS board meeting upstairs in the card room, at 10 a.m. on April 26.
        The meeting's program was a showing of "There Was Once," a fascinating and poignant documentary about a small town in Hungary with no current Jewish population.  However, a Catholic teacher took it upon herself to track down former residents or their descendants, to learn about life before World War II and the fate of the Jewish residents. Viewers watch her efforts unfold through the film.
         
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        GENEALOGY WITH JANICE: What’s in your closet? Old documents tell your family’s history
        InsideToronto.com
        Geneology with Janice
        Genealogy with Janice
        Photo/JANICE NICKERSON
        These documents were found in my grandmother's closet - in a shoebox!
        Genealogists spend a lot of time searching for old documents in libraries, archives and online databases. But in the excitement of finding new resources, we forget that some of the richest resources are hidden away in our own closets.
        Every once in a while, on visits to my parents’ home, I wander down into the storage room and bring up a box of “old stuff”. Often it contains items I’ve seen before, but sometimes I get a surprise. And I always learn something new, because I open it with my mother or father (and sometimes other relatives) and new stories come to light.
        One of these boxes contains my father’s old school report cards. The oldest describes his adjustment to kindergarten and progress in learning how to share, line up quietly and print his name. It amuses my school-age nephews to read his teachers’ comments about his tardiness and lack of “attention to his studies”.
        Another box is filled with scrapbooks my mother created when she was young. It seems that she kept every birthday card she received since she was four years old! These “old-fashioned” cards are fun to look at, and reading the notes inside them gives me an extra-special perspective on the relatives who sent them, including my great-grandmothers, whom I never got to meet.
        Visiting with my grandparents, I found other treasures: A family Bible from the 1880s contained lists of family births, marriages and deaths; a box of sympathy cards sent to my grandparents when my uncle died 50 years ago provided the names and addresses of many distant cousins; and a yellowed envelope contained a hand-written poem written by my great-grandfather describing his bicycle treks through the countryside to visit his sweetheart (my great-grandmother).
        Letters to other relatives asking about their “old documents” turned up still more exciting finds including a box of letters written by my great-grandmother to her son while was working in a logging camp in 1918. These letters are full of day-to-day family news including the antics of his younger siblings, births of new babies in the family, the progress of the farm and social events happening in town.
        So when was the last time you looked in your closet? Have you asked your parents, siblings, cousins and other relatives about their own old treasures? I hope I’ve given you the inspiration to revisit this precious resource.
        ---
        Author of ‘Crime and Punishment in Upper Canada: A Researcher’s Guide’ and ‘York’s Sacrifice: Militia Casualties of the War of 1812, Janice Nickerson lives and breathes genealogy. She believes that we all have interesting ancestors, we just need to learn their secrets. Find her online at UpperCanadaGenealogy.com and facebook.com/JaniceCNickerson
         

        Ben Affleck's slave-owning ancestor 'censored' from genealogy show

        Hacked Sony emails raise questions over a decision to omit part of star's family history from PBS programme, but makers say there were "more compelling" Affleck forebears to talk about.

         
         
         
         
         
         
        Actor Ben Affleck
        Actor Ben Affleck Photo: Bloomberg
         
        By Nick Allen, Los Angeles  10:27PM BST 17 Apr 2015
        Ben Affleck asked that a slave owning ancestor not be included when he appeared on a genealogy programme in the United States, according to leaked Sony emails.
        The star of upcoming movie Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice explored his family history on Finding Your Roots, which is broadcast by PBS.
         
        According to the emails he was one of a number of high-profile guests who turned out to have slave owning forebears, but the only one to want it edited out.
         
        Affleck was not named in the email exchange between the show's host Professor Henry Louis Gates, Jr and top Sony executive Michael Lynton in July last year. He was referred to as Batman and a "megastar".
         
        Professor Gates wrote: "For the first time one of our guests has asked us to edit out something about one of his ancestors - the fact that he owned slaves.
         
        "Now, four or five of our guests this season descend from slave owners. We've never had anyone ever try to censor or edit what we found. He's a megastar. What do we do?"
        The professor said he believed the star was "getting very bad advice" and it would be a "violation of PBS rules, actually, even for Batman" to edit out the footage.
         
        But when the show was broadcast in October last year it focused instead on other ancestors of the actor including one who served under George Washington, an occult enthusiast, and his mother who was active in the Civil Rights era.
         
        Professor Gates issued a statement today saying he had editorial control of the series and it had "never shied away from chapters of a family’s past that might be unpleasant".
        He added: "In the case of Mr Affleck we focused on what we felt were the most interesting aspects of his ancestry."
         
        In a statement PBS said: "It is clear from the (email) exchange how seriously Professor Gates takes editorial integrity.
         
        "He has told us that after reviewing approximately ten hours of footage for the episode, he and his producers made an independent editorial judgment to choose the most compelling narrative."
         
        From Gary Mokotoff's April 19 E-Zine:
        JewishGen Creates Educational Videos
        Phyllis Kramer, Vice President–Education of JewishGen, has created a series of five-minute videos about various aspects of JewishGen and genealogical
        research. They are:
           • Prepare For Your Search (for USA researchers)
           • Navigate JewishGen
           • Find Your Ancestral Town (for USA researchers)
           • Communicate with Other Researchers via:
              –JGFF: JewishGen Family Finder
              –FTJP: Family Tree of the Jewish People
              –JewishGen Discussion Groups
           • Jewish Records Indexing - Poland
           • Jewish Genealogy Websites & Organizations:
              –Jewish Genealogy Websites - Part I (JewishGen and IAJGS/JGS)
              –Jewish Genealogy Websites - Part II

        Go to
        http://www.jewishgen.org/education to view them.
         
        Confucius' family tree sets record for world's largest
        2015/04/19 22:50:40
         
        Taipei, April 19 (CNA) The Confucius genealogical line has been recognized by the Guinness Book of World Records as the longest family tree in history, containing the names of more than 2 million descendants, according to the latest edition of the Confucius genealogy book published in 2009.

        The 2 million figure is thrice that included in the previous edition of the genealogy book for descendants from Confucius -- the famous Chinese teacher, editor, politician, and philosopher -- who lived 551–479 BC.

        The first Confucius Genealogy was published in 1080 and has undergone a major revision every 60 years and a small revision every 30 years. The fourth edition, printed in 1937, contained 600,000 names.

        With a history of over 2,500 years covering more than 80 generations, the latest and the fifth edition of the Confucius Genealogy was printed in 80 volumes in 2009.

        This fifth edition is the first edition to include women, ethnic minorities and descendants living outside China.

        Confucius has 2 million known, registered descendants, with some estimated 3 million in all. Tens of thousands live outside of China.

        In the 14th century, a Kong descendant went to Korea, where some 34,000 descendants of Confucius now live. One main branch fled from Qufu, the Kong ancestral home, during the 1940s Chinese Civil War and settled in Taiwan.

        Kong Weiqian (孔維倩), a 78th generation descendant of Confucius, traveled all the way from mainland China to Taiwan last year and now studies at the National Chung Cheng University in Chiayi, southern Taiwan.

        Kong was a junior and marketing major at Jiangxi Normal University in China. She is now an exchange student at the National Chung Cheng University, a sister school of Jiangxi Normal University.

        Kong's middle name "Wei" is universally adopted among those in the 78th generation of Confucius and the middle name "De" is used among those in the 77th generation, according to Kong Weiqian.

        Based on family tradition, women usually are not listed in the Confucius' genealogy book. However, with the rise of gender equality, and the insistence of her father, her name is now in the family book as well, Kong Weiqian added.

        The family-run Confucius Genealogy Compilation Committee (CGCC) was registered in Hong Kong in 1998 and began collecting data, according to Kong Xing (孔祥祺), a 75th generation descendant of Confucius, who was then in Taiwan to look for the descendants of the family.

        The latest project to revise and update the Confucius family tree began in 1998 and was completed 10 years later.

        Notably, in South Korea, the descendants of Confucius have made outstanding achievements in various sectors, while the government attaches great importance to an annual grand worship ceremony held to commemorate him.

        In addition, South Korea's Sungkyunkwan University has been the center for studying and promotion of Confucianism as well as the cradle of distinguished scholars and statesmen starting from the Chosun Kingdom period for over 500 years to the present.

        (By Chiang Yuan-chen and Evelyn Kao)

         
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