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Re: [J28Sailors] Re: Genoa question

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  • john power
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 18, 2010
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      On Dec 18, 2010, at 7:59 AM, Roy Briscoe wrote:

      JP,
       
      Where did you find your J28? I was talking with my neighbor at the boat yard yesterday, he said he had someone coming to look at his Tartan 34-2 and that person had just sold his J28. The J28 owner was from Amherst, NH.
       
      Roy
       


      To: J28Sailors@yahoogroups.com
      From: sailingmaster@...
      Date: Sat, 18 Dec 2010 03:59:44 +0000
      Subject: [J28Sailors] Re: Genoa question

       
      Ill be in Long Island sound...maybe we should race! or rendezvous next summer

      I cant wait to get my boat in the water in spring

      JP

      --- In J28Sailors@yahoogroups.com, "John" <jfws88@...> wrote:
      >
      > John,
      > 
      > I sail with a 135 all season, that is until the last race when I put up my 105. I've used this sail up to 25 knots (reefed main) with no problems. Only once did I get caught outa control but that was my main trimmer falling asleep at the switch (another story).
      > 
      > I have rolled it a couple of times but never liked the way the boat felt or the sail looked. The boat will handle alot sail in a blow.
      > 
      > My next sail will be a 150 that will be spec'd to handle up to 15knots.
      > 
      > My main goal with the 150 is to get better pointing, my biggest problem when racing. Good luck.
      > 
      > John W.
      > 
      > --- In J28Sailors@yahoogroups.com, Bob Ryan <rryan14@> wrote:
      > >
      > > John,
      > > 
      > > I'd stay with a 135%, and if you can afford it, an asymmetrical spinnaker
      > > for the really light air. The J28 is a very good light air boat because of
      > > the large main. From 15-20 knots, we might reef the genoa a little bit
      > > since it is so easy to do. Over 20, the main usually needs to be reefed
      > > depending upon your crew weight.
      > > 
      > > A furled genoa is necessarily distorted - still functional, but not the
      > > ideal sail shape. I'd be concerned that a 150 would spend a lot of its
      > > life partially furled (I have no experience, so maybe I shouldn't say
      > > this). I don't know LIS but I cannot imagine it is that different than
      > > Marblehead. I never really wanted a larger genoa - but I did want an
      > > asymmetrical spinnaker.
      > > 
      > > -Bob
      > > 
      > > 
      > > 
      > > On Tue, Dec 7, 2010 at 10:16 AM, Thomas Quinlan <quinla_t@>wrote:
      > > 
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > John,
      > > > If I were staying with one roller furling sail for a broad wind range that
      > > > included frequent sailing in breezy conditions, I would stay with the
      > > > standard 135% headsail. It's slow as the wind drops below ten knots, but is
      > > > still easy to handle as the wind gets over twenty.
      > > > Summer winds on Lake Pontchartrain where I sail are usually very light, so
      > > > I do also have a roller furling 145% that I use when I know I'll be sailing
      > > > in winds under 15 knots. At that point it's still great off the wind, but
      > > > starts to be a hand-full upwind. I also use this as my #1+ sail off the
      > > > roller furler when racing.
      > > > My #1 non- furling sail for racing is a 155% and seems to work pretty well
      > > > up to about 12 knots. I have a blade for racing, but get almost no use out
      > > > of it (unless you're racing, going upwind, in 25 knots +, it's not worth the
      > > > trouble).
      > > >
      > > > The fractional rig means you get a lot of power off the main, so the
      > > > smaller 135% sail doesn't hurt you as much in light air as it would on a
      > > > masthead rig. Also, since its fractional, its a lot easier to handle in a
      > > > big breeze than a masthead sail. Like the ads used to say for this boat,
      > > > for short handed cruising, when the wind gets up over 25 Knots, just roll up
      > > > the jib, take a big pull on the back stay and keep truckin'.
      > > >
      > > > I've owned my J/28 since '97 (built in '86), and still haven't found a boat
      > > > I like better for the kind of sailing I do, which is mostly short handed
      > > > day-sailing and club racing, with occasional overnight and short cruises
      > > > with my wife.
      > > >
      > > > Enjoy!
      > > >
      > > > Tom
      > > > # 22 Voodoo Child
      > > >
      > > > ------------------------------
      > > > *From:* J. Smith <jason3317@>
      > > > *To:* J28Sailors@yahoogroups.com
      > > > *Sent:* Tue, December 7, 2010 3:50:55 AM
      > > > *Subject:* Re: [J28Sailors] Genoa question
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > The #1 on Compass Rose is a 145%. I just ordered a #2, which will be ~115%
      > > > and become my primary headsail.
      > > >
      > > > I find that the 145 is nice for 0-10 knots.
      > > >
      > > > Get a rope (or foam) luff to help with shaping when partially rolled up.
      > > >
      > > > I am using eVolution sails out of Easton, MD. They are terrific, good
      > > > service and great prices.
      > > >
      > > > Jason
      > > > ------------------------------
      > > > *From: *"John" <thistle4002@>
      > > > *Sender: *J28Sailors@yahoogroups.com
      > > > *Date: *Sun, 05 Dec 2010 20:40:20 -0000
      > > > *To: *<J28Sailors@yahoogroups.com>
      > > > *ReplyTo: *J28Sailors@yahoogroups.com
      > > > *Subject: *[J28Sailors] Genoa question
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > IM getting close to becoming a bona fide member of this group. About to
      > > > pull the trigger on a boat
      > > >
      > > > Another question...Having sailing racing dinghys my whole life, all with
      > > > one strictly sized jib, I am curious about people opinions on different
      > > > sized genoas (Probably the first real big purchase for this boat will be new
      > > > headsails)
      > > >
      > > > First question, with roller furling, why do people still ownd 100, 135 and
      > > > 150% sails?
      > > >
      > > > Second what is the best size, if you can only own one? I will probably do
      > > > most of my sailing single handed on Long Island sound (any other 28s out
      > > > there? I know of one in Black Rock)
      > > > I have been told by DOYLE to get the bigger sail, but cruising friends or
      > > > mine say that if i need to partially roll it up, it will distort. My
      > > > thinking was to get a 135 and keep and assym spinnaker on board for downwind
      > > > and lite air days (realistically, if the wind is light on Western LIS and
      > > > the TIDE is ebbing, I will be setting the 100%Yanmar and trimming the cooler
      > > > heavily!)
      > > >
      > > > Thanks again to all. I have gotten a ton of great advice from this group
      > > >
      > > > JP
      > > >
      > > > 
      > > >
      > >
      >




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