Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: A few questions

Expand Messages
  • j28sailor50
    Connecting the lights will not be too difficult. Do you want to solder or crimp on the connections? Find out the color of the wires on the boat side. Do you
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 6, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      Connecting the lights will not be too difficult. Do you want to solder or crimp on the connections? Find out the color of the wires on the boat side. Do you have 3 or 4 wires on the boat side? My mast and boat have both black and white wires for each light, so the set is different.

      You know the sets on the mast side. You can twist one mast set of wires to a boat set then check to see if it is connected to the right switch before you make a better connection.

      If there are three wires on the boat side one is ground. We will have to figure out which one, I can help you through that.

      Bruce


      --- In J28Sailors@yahoogroups.com, "j28verve" <rryan14@...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In J28Sailors@yahoogroups.com, "Lenny Reich" <lsreich@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Now that my boat is all together and in the water, I have a few questions --
      > >
      > > The electric power cables for the mast-head light and steaming light exit the mast just below the mast collar, up near the ceiling in the forward cabin. They are rather long, and I have a feeling that the guys who prepared the boat for transport pulled them out of their conduit. Where do they connect into the boat's electrical system?
      >
      > I have this very problem and may resort to having a marine electrician fix it correctly. Today, we have a trailer hitches' three-prong rubber plug that connects at the mast step under the floor board (it does not come down from the ceiling as you described). It doesn't work. This was an emergency fix two seasons ago after the boat yard obliterated the original conduit plug. However, I know the both lights do technically work as these were tested (with a 12 volt external battery) prior to the mast going up.
      >
      > From my memory, coming out of the mast, I have two sets of wires and a larger diameter yellow wire, which I take to be the ground (or lightening rod).
      >
      > Set 1: yellow + green
      > Set 2: brown + white
      >
      > I don't recall the wire colors coming from the boat's electric supply. I am confused.
      >
      > If anyone could help me with the wiring, this would really help me (or better, take a digital picture) of the connection.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > >
      > > Has anyone modified or replaced the monolithic Lexan drop board for the companionway? It just seems heavy, awkward, and ugly. Two or three wooden boards would look very nice in there.
      > >
      > > What size genoa sheets work best? The ones I have inherited are 3/8" and slip through the winch self-tailing mechanism. I tried a small piece of 7/16", but that seemed to slip a bit too, while 1/2" seems awfully big.
      >
      > Bigger is definitely better on your hands. Technically, you can get away with a good quality sheet like New England Ropes Staset 3/8" but it will chew your hands to pieces. I know this, because I did this for my spinnaker sheets. 1/2" is the way to go and slickness finish goes away after a season. Milwaukee Rigging on eBay has decent prices for sta-set.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > >
      > > Where do you cleat the spinnaker halyard? I only have one cleat on the mast, and the topping lift needs it. At the moment, I have run the halyard through a turning block at the base of the mast and tied it off to the grab-rail -- not a very good solution. I suppose I could mount another cleat on the mast or maybe one on the deck, between the mast and the small hatch above the head.
      >
      > You should consider routing the halyard and pole via blocks and a clutch to the cockpit. I don't like going up to the mast to drop a spinnaker (unless you are talking about an asymmetric with a sock.
      >
      >
      > >
      > > Thanks for your input --
      > >
      > > Lenny
      > >
      >
    • Jason Smith
      Lenny, if you go with new jib sheets, you may consider using 5/16 (8mm) - but have an extra cover added to the last 5-6ft on each end to bulk up the line where
      Message 2 of 8 , Jul 6, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Lenny, if you go with new jib sheets, you may consider using 5/16
        (8mm) - but have an extra cover added to the last 5-6ft on each end to
        bulk up the line where it is winched and handled. Or, use a larger
        diameter and strip the cover. You get the idea.
      • jfws88
        Lenny, Unless you have LED lights for steaming and masthead polarity doesn t matter. You should have four wires coming from your switch box, two hot 12vdc+
        Message 3 of 8 , Jul 7, 2009
        • 0 Attachment
          Lenny,

          Unless you have LED lights for steaming and masthead polarity doesn't matter. You should have four wires coming from your switch box, two "hot" 12vdc+ and two ground, 12vdc-. If you can ID these wires and the two pairs coming down the mast, connect the pair with one 12vdc+ and one 12vdc-. Turn that switch on and see which light, mast head or steaming comes on. label and/or rewire accordingly.

          If no lights come on them it's possible the wires got pulled out but They are pretty secure in the conduit so I dought it. It they did, major PITA.


          --- In J28Sailors@yahoogroups.com, "j28verve" <rryan14@...> wrote:
          >
          > --- In J28Sailors@yahoogroups.com, "Lenny Reich" <lsreich@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Now that my boat is all together and in the water, I have a few questions --
          > >
          > > The electric power cables for the mast-head light and steaming light exit the mast just below the mast collar, up near the ceiling in the forward cabin. They are rather long, and I have a feeling that the guys who prepared the boat for transport pulled them out of their conduit. Where do they connect into the boat's electrical system?
          >
          > I have this very problem and may resort to having a marine electrician fix it correctly. Today, we have a trailer hitches' three-prong rubber plug that connects at the mast step under the floor board (it does not come down from the ceiling as you described). It doesn't work. This was an emergency fix two seasons ago after the boat yard obliterated the original conduit plug. However, I know the both lights do technically work as these were tested (with a 12 volt external battery) prior to the mast going up.
          >
          > From my memory, coming out of the mast, I have two sets of wires and a larger diameter yellow wire, which I take to be the ground (or lightening rod).
          >
          > Set 1: yellow + green
          > Set 2: brown + white
          >
          > I don't recall the wire colors coming from the boat's electric supply. I am confused.
          >
          > If anyone could help me with the wiring, this would really help me (or better, take a digital picture) of the connection.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > >
          > > Has anyone modified or replaced the monolithic Lexan drop board for the companionway? It just seems heavy, awkward, and ugly. Two or three wooden boards would look very nice in there.
          > >
          > > What size genoa sheets work best? The ones I have inherited are 3/8" and slip through the winch self-tailing mechanism. I tried a small piece of 7/16", but that seemed to slip a bit too, while 1/2" seems awfully big.
          >
          > Bigger is definitely better on your hands. Technically, you can get away with a good quality sheet like New England Ropes Staset 3/8" but it will chew your hands to pieces. I know this, because I did this for my spinnaker sheets. 1/2" is the way to go and slickness finish goes away after a season. Milwaukee Rigging on eBay has decent prices for sta-set.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > >
          > > Where do you cleat the spinnaker halyard? I only have one cleat on the mast, and the topping lift needs it. At the moment, I have run the halyard through a turning block at the base of the mast and tied it off to the grab-rail -- not a very good solution. I suppose I could mount another cleat on the mast or maybe one on the deck, between the mast and the small hatch above the head.
          >
          > You should consider routing the halyard and pole via blocks and a clutch to the cockpit. I don't like going up to the mast to drop a spinnaker (unless you are talking about an asymmetric with a sock.
          >
          >
          > >
          > > Thanks for your input --
          > >
          > > Lenny
          > >
          >
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.