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[Italian Renaissance Costuming] Re: Linen vs Cotton debate- Any suggestions?

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  • n2kye
    ... How do you do this? (How much salt, how much solvent, which solvent (I presume water?) at what temperature, etc.) ... If both color and shrinkage have been
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 24 4:29 AM
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      --- In italianrenaissancecostuming@y..., Holly Frantz <hefrantz@y...>
      wrote:

      > The first thing I do with my linen is set the color
      > using lots of kosher salt.

      How do you do this? (How much salt, how much solvent, which solvent
      (I presume water?) at what temperature, etc.)

      > Then I wash the linen in extremely hot water so
      > it can go ahead and shrink and do what it likes.
      > Once the garment is finished, it's only washed
      > in cold water.

      If both color and shrinkage have been set, is there a difference that
      you would not want to wash in a warmer temperature water?


      Brenda, another newbie to this list
      webwarren@...
    • Holly Frantz
      ... Let s just say I d prefer to be safe than sorry. I have once washed the linen in warm water to make sure that some mud was removed and didn t have any
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 24 4:58 AM
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        > If both color and shrinkage have been set, is there
        > a difference that
        > you would not want to wash in a warmer temperature
        > water?

        Let's just say I'd prefer to be safe than sorry. I
        have once washed the linen in warm water to make sure
        that some mud was removed and didn't have any
        shrinkage and didn't notice any fading in color (the
        outfit was red and black).

        If you search through the SCA garb archives there are
        many discussions on how to set color in fabric, what's
        best for naturals v. synthetics, etc. I think the
        general rule is salt for naturals and vinegar for
        synthetics but I've used the reverse and didn't see
        any real difference in the two. You do have to let
        synthetics sit longer, though. What I do has been the
        result of trial and error, what works for my water
        (chlorinated, very low mineral content), etc.
        Different people have different procedures.

        For linen, I run an old washer (or bathtub, large
        plastic bin, etc.) full of enough luke-warm water to
        cover the fabric about 1". You want as strong a
        concentration as possible so only use as much water as
        you need to submerse the fabric. The water shouldn't
        be cold and shouldn't be hot either, just a nice "been
        sitting out on the table for a few hours" type of
        warm. For 10 yards of linen, I use two large boxes of
        Kosher or Pickling Salt. (These are the boxes that
        are about 8" high. I'm currently in the UK on a work
        project and can't run to the cupboard to find out how
        many oz. in a box). Stir well to make sure all the
        salt is dissolved before you add the fabric. Add the
        fabric and stir well to make sure that all the air
        bubbles are removed and all parts of the cloth are
        wet. Let sit for 45 minutes to an hour, stirring
        every 15 minutes. I then stick the fabric in the
        washer on the spin cycle to try to remove as much
        water as possible. I then let the fabric air dry
        before dumping it in the washer with hot water and
        soap. Linen can go through the dryer to at this
        point. Again, once I've got the garment made up, I
        don't put it in the dryer except to get out wrinkles
        (I know it probably won't shrink after what I've put
        it through but I don't like to push my luck!).

        If you're looking for a commercial product to set the
        fabric, try Dharma Trading's dye set product.
        http://www.dharmatrading.com/other_ingredients.html
        I've used it a few times with good results. Be
        careful though b/c the instructions say you need to
        wear gloves and protective goggles, etc. I think the
        Ritz dye company in the U.S. makes a dye fixative but
        I've never been able to find it.

        Niccola



        --- n2kye <webwarren@...> wrote:
        > --- In italianrenaissancecostuming@y..., Holly
        > Frantz <hefrantz@y...>
        > wrote:
        >
        > > The first thing I do with my linen is set the
        > color
        > > using lots of kosher salt.
        >
        > How do you do this? (How much salt, how much
        > solvent, which solvent
        > (I presume water?) at what temperature, etc.)
        >
        > > Then I wash the linen in extremely hot water so
        > > it can go ahead and shrink and do what it likes.
        > > Once the garment is finished, it's only washed
        > > in cold water.
        >
        > If both color and shrinkage have been set, is there
        > a difference that
        > you would not want to wash in a warmer temperature
        > water?
        >
        >
        > Brenda, another newbie to this list
        > webwarren@...
        >
        >
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      • empathia50
        I have found that helps is to hang it out wet on a hanger. the ... I do this too Deb, I use white fabric hangers ( you can make some with batting) to keep
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 24 7:13 AM
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          "I have found that helps is to hang it out wet on a hanger. the
          > weight of the water pulls the creases out and reduces the need for
          > ironing. "

          I do this too Deb, I use white fabric hangers ( you can make some
          with batting) to keep those awful hanger lines out.

          Unes*
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