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Re: [Italian Renaissance Costuming] OT: Compromise Emails

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  • lilinah@earthlink.net
    Isabella D Angelo ... That s what Yahoo says. That s only around 20,000 active accounts, if what Yahoo says is true. That s
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 27, 2012
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      Isabella D'Angelo <isabelladangelo@...>
      > Yes, however only 5% of those 400,000 emails were active.

      That's what Yahoo says. That's "only" around 20,000 active accounts, if what Yahoo says is true. That's enough to wreak some mayhem.

      Yahoo also said that the passwords were all properly encrypted. Yet other reputable sources say the passwords were in a straightforward text file. I suppose it depends on whom you believe.

      > That's also 400,000 out of the millions of yahoo email accounts.
      > Considering it's been affecting almost every historical/re-enacting related
      > list I'm on, I seriously doubt it's related to the earlier hack.

      Spams are showing up from Yahoo accounts on nearly every list i'm on, and that includes many that have nothing whatsoever to do with re-enacting.

      > Plus, it's now affecting AOL systems.

      There were some AOL passwords among those stolen. And some gmail and Hot Mail, too. But Yahoo had the most.

      > And I'm getting some people w[h]ere I work in the IT security industry
      > interested in this so I'm trying to collect data to actually give them. ;-)

      I wish you all the best in your endeavor.

      Since i immediately delete such messages - usually they have no subject line - although some genuine e-mails also have no subject - i really don't recall all the lists they came through, when, what the spam or malware links were, under whose names they were sent, etc. Perhaps some people are saving their dangerous e-mails, but i sure don't want them hanging around in my e-mailbox.

      People should still change their passwords.

      Fiametta Basilio
    • Isabella D'Angelo
      Yes, 20,000 email address out of 310 million in the entire world. It s really a very small number and doesn t seem to match up to the constant activity
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 27, 2012
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        Yes, 20,000 email address out of 310 million in the entire world. It's really a very small number and doesn't seem to match up to the constant activity since Monday. The spammer has been going alphabetically (probably a computer program by the hacker/spammer). It's now on the B's of AOL...

        Holding the link itself is not harmful - it's clicking on the link that will install the re-direct virus. For those that are on digest, don't freak about keeping digest versions of the group that might have some good material you wish to keep for future reference. This is not one of those "scary" just-by-seeing-it-you-are-infected spam emails. It's a typical spammer in every way except the level of people affected.

        Please, if you have any further comments or questions, feel free to email me directly. I hate to take up more time on this list regarding a very OT topic. :-)

        -Isabella

        --- In Italian_Renaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com, lilinah@... wrote:
        >
        > Isabella D'Angelo <isabelladangelo@...>
        > > Yes, however only 5% of those 400,000 emails were active.
        >
        > That's what Yahoo says. That's "only" around 20,000 active accounts, if what Yahoo says is true. That's enough to wreak some mayhem.
        >
        > Yahoo also said that the passwords were all properly encrypted. Yet other reputable sources say the passwords were in a straightforward text file. I suppose it depends on whom you believe.
        >
        > > That's also 400,000 out of the millions of yahoo email accounts.
        > > Considering it's been affecting almost every historical/re-enacting related
        > > list I'm on, I seriously doubt it's related to the earlier hack.
        >
        > Spams are showing up from Yahoo accounts on nearly every list i'm on, and that includes many that have nothing whatsoever to do with re-enacting.
        >
        > > Plus, it's now affecting AOL systems.
        >
        > There were some AOL passwords among those stolen. And some gmail and Hot Mail, too. But Yahoo had the most.
        >
        > > And I'm getting some people w[h]ere I work in the IT security industry
        > > interested in this so I'm trying to collect data to actually give them. ;-)
        >
        > I wish you all the best in your endeavor.
        >
        > Since i immediately delete such messages - usually they have no subject line - although some genuine e-mails also have no subject - i really don't recall all the lists they came through, when, what the spam or malware links were, under whose names they were sent, etc. Perhaps some people are saving their dangerous e-mails, but i sure don't want them hanging around in my e-mailbox.
        >
        > People should still change their passwords.
        >
        > Fiametta Basilio
        >
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