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Re: [Italian Renaissance Costuming] Digest Number 1880

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  • Shannon Ward
    The headdress also bears a certain resemblance to the Spanish cofia com tranzado , about which there us quite a lot of information in Ruth Matilda Anderson s
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 1, 2011
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      The headdress also bears a certain resemblance to the Spanish "cofia com tranzado", about which there us quite a lot of information in Ruth Matilda Anderson's book on Hispanic Costume.

      Caterina &c



      On 2011-02-01, at 6:32 AM, Italian_Renaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com wrote:

      > Italian Renaissance Costuming - Researching Italian Renaissance Clothing
      > Messages In This Digest (2 Messages)
      > 1a.
      > Re: Unusual Headdress on a Terracotta Bust From: Jacki/erica
      > 1b.
      > Re: Unusual Headdress on a Terracotta Bust From: otsisto
      > View All Topics | Create New Topic Messages
      > 1a.
      > Re: Unusual Headdress on a Terracotta Bust
      > Posted by: "Jacki/erica" edenwild@... elspeth205
      > Mon Jan 31, 2011 6:43 am (PST)
      >
      >
      >
      > Hope this works are a couple of examples of portraits of the d'este girls
      > Isabella and Beatrice
      >
      > Nope did not work. Okay - I googled Isabella and Beatrice d'Este as I
      > love their earlier portraits and the stripey dresses. Davinci painted one
      > of Isabella and it also has the circlet/ribbon headband. And Bartolomeo
      > painted Beata Beatrice with similarstylings. So I will go out on a limb and
      > say it is a definite possiblity for the circlet and//or ribbon on the bust.
      >
      > Elspeth Bouchannane
      > Oertha West
      >
      > Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
      > Messages in this topic (9)
      > 1b.
      > Re: Unusual Headdress on a Terracotta Bust
      > Posted by: "otsisto" otsisto@... alfrdis
      > Mon Jan 31, 2011 11:50 am (PST)
      >
      >
      >
      > head bands
      > http://tinyurl.com/4ltcnlq
      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Isabella_d%27Este_palazzo_ducale.jpg
      > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Isabella_d%27este.jpg
      > http://tinyurl.com/4ane7xe
      > http://www.gogmsite.net/_Media/1510_ca_beatrice_deste_by_b.jpg
      > http://tinyurl.com/4lphw5x
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > Hope this works are a couple of examples of portraits of the d'este girls
      > Isabella and Beatrice
      > Nope did not work. Okay - I googled Isabella and Beatrice d'Este as I
      > love their earlier portraits and the stripey dresses. Davinci painted one
      > of Isabella and it also has the circlet/ribbon headband. And Bartolomeo
      > painted Beata Beatrice with similarstylings. So I will go out on a limb and
      > say it is a definite possiblity for the circlet and//or ribbon on the bust.
      >
      > Elspeth Bouchannane
      > Oertha West
      >
      > Back to top Reply to sender | Reply to group | Reply via web post
      > Messages in this topic (9)
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    • hillaryrose7
      You re right! They definitely look related. Here are some Italian examples of long-tailed-snoods as well: 1.
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 1, 2011
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        You're right! They definitely look related. Here are some Italian examples of "long-tailed-snoods" as well:

        1. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Araldi_pallavicino.jpg

        2. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ambrogio_de_Predis_002.jpg

        3. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Predis,_Giovanni_Ambrogio_de_-_Blanca_Maria_Sforza_-_c._1493.jpg

        I wonder which style came first, the knotted headdress on the bust, or the "long-tailed-snood"? I'd really like to find more examples of the knotted design, but I've had no luck so far. But as far as ribbon circlets go, my favorite example has to be the one Beatrice d'Este is wearing in this portrait:

        http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ambrogio_de_Predis_-_Ritratto_di_una_dama.jpg

        I think it would look beautiful with the knotted headdress!

        Elisabetta di Portinari


        --- In Italian_Renaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com, Shannon Ward <shannonkrysta@...> wrote:
        >
        > The headdress also bears a certain resemblance to the Spanish "cofia com tranzado", about which there us quite a lot of information in Ruth Matilda Anderson's book on Hispanic Costume.
        >
        > Caterina &c
      • ivinian
        The Predis portrait in that last link is a few years older than the Ambrogio, I think, but not much older (my source says 1490 vs. 1493). The tail thingie is a
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 2, 2011
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          The Predis portrait in that last link is a few years older than the Ambrogio, I think, but not much older (my source says 1490 vs. 1493). The tail thingie is a coazzone, according to Herald, sometimes worn with a little veil of fine fabric tied with ribbons and pearls, itself called a trinzale, and I think I remember the getup being of Spanish origin; I'll see what I can dig up. That last link is one of my favorites too!

          Vangelista

          --- In Italian_Renaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com, "hillaryrose7" <hillaryrose7@...> wrote:
          >
          > You're right! They definitely look related. Here are some Italian examples of "long-tailed-snoods" as well:
          >
          > 1. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Araldi_pallavicino.jpg
          >
          > 2. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ambrogio_de_Predis_002.jpg
          >
          > 3. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Predis,_Giovanni_Ambrogio_de_-_Blanca_Maria_Sforza_-_c._1493.jpg
          >
          > I wonder which style came first, the knotted headdress on the bust, or the "long-tailed-snood"? I'd really like to find more examples of the knotted design, but I've had no luck so far. But as far as ribbon circlets go, my favorite example has to be the one Beatrice d'Este is wearing in this portrait:
          >
          > http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ambrogio_de_Predis_-_Ritratto_di_una_dama.jpg
        • hillaryrose7
          Thank you so much for giving me the correct names for the coazzone and trinzale, Vangelista! :) I felt silly calling it a long-tailed-snood. It would make
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 2, 2011
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            Thank you so much for giving me the correct names for the coazzone and trinzale, Vangelista! :) I felt silly calling it a "long-tailed-snood." It would make sense for it to be of Spanish origin, as Spanish fashion seemed to be "in vogue."

            Isn't that portrait beautiful? I love it! I plan on making a reta based on that design as soon as I can! :D

            Elisabetta di Portinari

            --- In Italian_Renaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com, ivinian <no_reply@...> wrote:
            >
            > The Predis portrait in that last link is a few years older than the Ambrogio, I think, but not much older (my source says 1490 vs. 1493). The tail thingie is a coazzone, according to Herald, sometimes worn with a little veil of fine fabric tied with ribbons and pearls, itself called a trinzale, and I think I remember the getup being of Spanish origin; I'll see what I can dig up. That last link is one of my favorites too!
            >
            > Vangelista
            >
            > --- In Italian_Renaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com, "hillaryrose7" <hillaryrose7@> wrote:
            > >
            > > You're right! They definitely look related. Here are some Italian examples of "long-tailed-snoods" as well:
            > >
            > > 1. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Araldi_pallavicino.jpg
            > >
            > > 2. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ambrogio_de_Predis_002.jpg
            > >
            > > 3. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Predis,_Giovanni_Ambrogio_de_-_Blanca_Maria_Sforza_-_c._1493.jpg
            > >
            > > I wonder which style came first, the knotted headdress on the bust, or the "long-tailed-snood"? I'd really like to find more examples of the knotted design, but I've had no luck so far. But as far as ribbon circlets go, my favorite example has to be the one Beatrice d'Este is wearing in this portrait:
            > >
            > > http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ambrogio_de_Predis_-_Ritratto_di_una_dama.jpg
            >
          • ivinian
            Most welcome! The fashion seems to have endured well. In that famous portrait of Eleonora di Toledo, Eleonora wears a very similar net hairnet and shoulder
            Message 5 of 7 , Feb 3, 2011
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              Most welcome! The fashion seems to have endured well. In that famous portrait of Eleonora di Toledo, Eleonora wears a very similar net hairnet and shoulder covering (I hesitate to call it a fazzoletto, since it's netted, but I think that's the effect she was aiming for--like those fine silk or sheer linen kerchiefs women tucked into their necklines). The pearling looks like a nightmare to do, but wow, wouldn't it be just gorgeous...

              --- In Italian_Renaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com, "hillaryrose7" <hillaryrose7@...> wrote:
              >
              > Thank you so much for giving me the correct names for the coazzone and trinzale, Vangelista! :) I felt silly calling it a "long-tailed-snood." It would make sense for it to be of Spanish origin, as Spanish fashion seemed to be "in vogue."
              >
              > Isn't that portrait beautiful? I love it! I plan on making a reta based on that design as soon as I can! :D
              > > > http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ambrogio_de_Predis_-_Ritratto_di_una_dama.jpg
              > >
              >
            • Bella
              Without further ado.... http://realmofvenus.renaissanceitaly.net/yourgarb/showcase.htm Lady Bella Lucia da Verona (Anabella Wake) The Realm of Venus@
              Message 6 of 7 , Feb 4, 2011
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                Without further ado....

                http://realmofvenus.renaissanceitaly.net/yourgarb/showcase.htm

                Lady Bella Lucia da Verona (Anabella Wake)
                The Realm of Venus@ RenaissanceItaly.net
                The Barony of Innilgard, Lochac (Adelaide, South Australia)





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • hillaryrose7
                I love that pearled shoulder covering too! I hesitate to call it a fazzoletto too, since it s more of a net than lightweight fabric. I ve always wanted to make
                Message 7 of 7 , Feb 6, 2011
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                  I love that pearled shoulder covering too! I hesitate to call it a fazzoletto too, since it's more of a net than lightweight fabric. I've always wanted to make one, but I don't think it would look right with my costume period. Still, I love her hairnet too!

                  Elisabetta di Portinari

                  --- In Italian_Renaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com, ivinian <no_reply@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Most welcome! The fashion seems to have endured well. In that famous portrait of Eleonora di Toledo, Eleonora wears a very similar net hairnet and shoulder covering (I hesitate to call it a fazzoletto, since it's netted, but I think that's the effect she was aiming for--like those fine silk or sheer linen kerchiefs women tucked into their necklines). The pearling looks like a nightmare to do, but wow, wouldn't it be just gorgeous...
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