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Re: [Italian Renaissance Costuming] Clothing Style Help

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  • Bella
    A couple of points I would like to comment on if I may. Courtesans did not wear one or another particular colour as far as I have discovered. In fact you will
    Message 1 of 12 , Jan 30, 2011
      A couple of points I would like to comment on if I may. Courtesans did not wear
      one or another particular colour as far as I have discovered. In fact you will
      find that although yellow was an exception in the wardrobe of Eleonora de
      Toledo, both she and her daughter in law Giovanna owned items in both red and
      yellow ('Moda a Firenze', p.28), red of course being a very popular colour
      throughout the sixteenth century, and yellow finding favour in the second half
      of the century. The yellow stripe or band that was required by Florentine law to
      be worn by courtesans on veils often gets amplified so that the colour seems to
      have taken on a life of its own.

      Another thing is that we cannot use a Venetian example of a loose gown without
      the 'baragoni' (decorative shoulder bits) as an example of the practice in
      Florence. All of the Florentine examples I've seen (including all of the ones in
      'Moda...') have 'baragoni'.

      If I had to decide what this young lady is wearing, I would hazard a guess that
      she is wearing a doublet. From 'Moda a Firenze', p.80:

      "In the wardrobe of Cammilla Martelli there are frequent records of petticoat
      made up of the skirt only...This could then be completed [in the sense of 'worn
      with'], not by the traditional low-necked bodice, but by an independent garment
      of a totally new type which was destined to enjoy great fortune, and which was
      not present in Eleonora's wardrobe: the doublet. Taken from the male wardrobe,
      the doublet clothed the bust and terminated at the waist, either straight or
      finished with little tabs. It had a standing collar, which could also be worn
      open, a buttoned front opening and narrow sleeves. Already by the 1570s there
      were a remarkable number of doublets recorded for Cammilla and her daughter.
      Some of these , often very elaborate, were made up to match petticoats without
      bodice."

      Hope this helps in some way.


      Bella
    • Karen Finnemore
      This does help, yes. As I had said, I could not venture to assign this portrait as a courtesan due to colors, without having appropriate resources to back
      Message 2 of 12 , Jan 30, 2011
        This does help, yes. As I had said, I could not venture to assign this
        portrait as a courtesan due to colors, without having appropriate resources
        to back that up, and I simply haven't had the time today to research that
        aspect thoroughly.

        I do appreciate the Moda a Firenze reference on the doublet. It has been
        some time since I have had access to the book, sadly. I have many portraits
        and woodcuts of women wearing this style of jerkin, however they always had
        an overgown or doublet over top, as well. (I have always been taught that a
        doublet was short sleeved and a jerkin long sleeved, so forgive me if I mix
        them up.) I will readily admit that Nicholas's explanation of this being a
        younger girl is very plausible, (and thank you! That hadn't crossed my
        mind!!)

        -Ren


        On Sun, Jan 30, 2011 at 8:47 PM, Bella
        <bella_lucia_da_verona@...>wrote:

        >
        >
        > A couple of points I would like to comment on if I may. Courtesans did not
        > wear
        > one or another particular colour as far as I have discovered. In fact you
        > will
        > find that although yellow was an exception in the wardrobe of Eleonora de
        > Toledo, both she and her daughter in law Giovanna owned items in both red
        > and
        > yellow ('Moda a Firenze', p.28), red of course being a very popular colour
        > throughout the sixteenth century, and yellow finding favour in the second
        > half
        > of the century. The yellow stripe or band that was required by Florentine
        > law to
        > be worn by courtesans on veils often gets amplified so that the colour
        > seems to
        > have taken on a life of its own.
        >
        > Another thing is that we cannot use a Venetian example of a loose gown
        > without
        > the 'baragoni' (decorative shoulder bits) as an example of the practice in
        > Florence. All of the Florentine examples I've seen (including all of the
        > ones in
        > 'Moda...') have 'baragoni'.
        >
        > If I had to decide what this young lady is wearing, I would hazard a guess
        > that
        > she is wearing a doublet. From 'Moda a Firenze', p.80:
        >
        > "In the wardrobe of Cammilla Martelli there are frequent records of
        > petticoat
        > made up of the skirt only...This could then be completed [in the sense of
        > 'worn
        > with'], not by the traditional low-necked bodice, but by an independent
        > garment
        > of a totally new type which was destined to enjoy great fortune, and which
        > was
        > not present in Eleonora's wardrobe: the doublet. Taken from the male
        > wardrobe,
        > the doublet clothed the bust and terminated at the waist, either straight
        > or
        > finished with little tabs. It had a standing collar, which could also be
        > worn
        > open, a buttoned front opening and narrow sleeves. Already by the 1570s
        > there
        > were a remarkable number of doublets recorded for Cammilla and her
        > daughter.
        > Some of these , often very elaborate, were made up to match petticoats
        > without
        > bodice."
        >
        > Hope this helps in some way.
        >
        > Bella
        >
        >


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