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re: fur

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  • Brad Moore
    Actually, De, most historians place the beginning of the Italian Renaissance in the late 13th century based upon societal and economic factors.  Petrarch
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 23, 2010
      Actually, De, most historians place the beginning of the Italian Renaissance in the late 13th century based upon societal and economic factors.  Petrarch was born in 1304, Boccaccio in 1313, the medieval period was over in Northern Italy by the late 1200's, humanism was on the rise, and the middle class was growing stronger economically.  A great book to check out is Power and Imagination:  City States in Renaissance Italy by Lauro Martines. 

      As for fur, a great source to check out is Jacqueline Herald's Renaissance Dress in Italy, 1400-1500.  Its out of print, but is widely available through interlibrary loan.  Unfortunately its photos are in black and white, but its a fantastic resource for costuming.  As Donata Bonacorsi points out, fur was widely used by both men and women on their garments. 
       Brad Moore 

      "If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world."
      - J.R.R. Tolkien





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    • Brandy
      I ve heard mid 1300 s for the start. As for the Southern portion of Italy, I d say they too probably wore lots of fur, at least in winter. Fireplaces are nice,
      Message 2 of 11 , Jun 24, 2010
        I've heard mid 1300's for the start. As for the Southern portion of Italy, I'd say they too probably wore lots of fur, at least in winter. Fireplaces are nice, but just not the same compared to central heat and air. Florence is is about the middle and Eleonora Medici by accounts had tons of fur lined this and that for Winter use and I assume her place was at least as well heated as most.

        --- In Italian_Renaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com, "otsisto" <otsisto@...> wrote:
        >
        > I have not heard anyone say that the Italian Renaissance began in the 1300s.
        > The earliest I've heard is mid 1400s but my vote is late 1400s.
        > Fur use also depended on region. If you were in the northern regions you
        > would probably have more fur use. In the southern regions, not so much.
        >
        > De
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > First, you need to define "Italian Renaissance" since it started in
        > the 1400's (some would even argue earlier) and continues for a couple
        > of hundred years.
        >
        > But fur was used throughout that time period in multiple ways for both
        > men and women.
        > lining, edging and also as empty pets... They, like us, also were
        > known to only "semi" line garments so that the expensive fur would show.
        >
        >
        > Donata Bonacorsi
        >
      • Ann Catelli
        Petrach died in 1374; he was the first writer to use the vernacular, mroe modern Italian, rather than Latin. He is usually cited as the beginning of the
        Message 3 of 11 , Jun 24, 2010
          Petrach died in 1374; he was the first writer to use the vernacular, mroe modern Italian, rather than Latin.

          He is usually cited as the beginning of the Renaissance.

          Ann in CT

          --- On Wed, 6/23/10, otsisto <otsisto@...> wrote:

          > I have not heard anyone say that the
          > Italian Renaissance began in the 1300s.
          >
          > De
        • Donata Bonacorsi
          In the art world, Giotto s work in the Scrovegni chapel that was consecrated in 1305 is considered the beginning of the Italian Renaissance. Since the
          Message 4 of 11 , Jun 25, 2010
            In the art world, Giotto's work in the Scrovegni chapel that was
            consecrated in 1305 is considered the beginning of the Italian
            Renaissance. Since the renaissance was such a long period of time in
            Italy, many experts talk of "Early" (roughly 1300's and Giotto and the
            Scrovengi Chapel), "High" (roughly 1400's and Ghilberti's the North
            doors to the Baptistry, Brunnelschi and one-point perspective) and
            "Late" (roughly 1500's da Vinci, Michelangelo and Raphael, Titian--
            although some would argue some of Titian's work pushes into mannerism
            and early modern). You will find that the lines are fuzzy as
            different artists work in different styles throughout the time period).

            Back to fur, a great book to read about the subject is "Dressing
            Renaissance Florence" by Carol Collier Frick (isbn 0-8018-6939-0) It
            goes into sumptuary laws and all sorts of information.

            Donata
          • Brad Moore
            To further Donata Bonacorsi s discourse, I think it is important to point out that divergent disciplines date the term renaissance in different ways. 
            Message 5 of 11 , Jun 25, 2010
              To further Donata Bonacorsi's discourse, I think it is important to point out that divergent disciplines date the term "renaissance" in different ways.  My undergraduate degree is in art history, and artistically Giotto is indeed considered by most to be the front runner of the Italian Renaissance.  I am now working on my Master's degree in the history of textiles and fashion technology, and historians tend to place the movement earlier, in the late 12th century, basing it on economic and social movements which were occurring in Northern Italy.  The research of Lauro Martines is a fantastic place to start, as I mentioned in an earlier post.  The rise of the middle class, and the paupering of the knightly class came earlier in Italy by as much as 100 to 200 years to other parts of Europe.  The city states of Italy were among the richest in Europe, due to trade, and in the late 1200's urbanism was on the rise, as was humanism, one of
              the major philosophies of the Italian Renaissance.  These factors, among others led to the shift in clothing and conspicuous wealth that we associate with the more visual aspects of the renaissance era.  Art, fashion, and disposable wealth were a shift away from life in the Medieval age.  I hope this digression isn't too far off topic, and if so I apologize, but I feel it is beneficial to understand the circumstances in which shifts in fashion and clothing technology were taking place.   
               Brad Moore 

              "If more of us valued food and cheer and song above hoarded gold, it would be a merrier world."
              - J.R.R. Tolkien





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            • otsisto
              by Calisto Piazzo http://www.thecipher.com/viol_CalistoPiazzaDaLodi_1528_best_deta.jpg http://www.labirinto.com/artisti/500/cl225.jpg De
              Message 6 of 11 , Jun 29, 2010
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