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Re: 1530's Men's Closet

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  • borderlands15213
    Found it. And I ll be jingo ed, she did use the term cobbler. That s interesting. Still, it could be modern usage. I find a great many individuals who
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 20, 2008
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      Found it. And I'll be jingo'ed, she did use the term "cobbler."
      That's interesting.
      Still, it could be modern usage. I find a great many individuals who
      believe that "cobbler" is a pleasingly quaint and totally correct
      term for one who makes shoes.
      Or, it could also be a question of translation.

      How the guilds are structured in various countries within a century
      or a half-century, is an interesting question. As I've said, a new
      project for me! ;->

      Thanks!
      Yseult the Gentle

      --- In Italian_Renaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com, "morbid0000"
      <marco-borromei@...> wrote:
      >
      > My mistake entirely. I'm sure the author used the correct term for
      > that region/time/trade. I don't know if ALL of Europe had the same
      > guild strusture at the same time [since not much else was precisely
      > consistent], but I'm sure she had the correct term regardless of
      what I
      > wrote here.
      > M


      > <borderlands15213@> wrote:
      > > I have to comment, though: in period, cobblers did *not* make
      shoes.
      > > Shoemakers made shoes. Cobblers repaired shoes, patching worn
      places
      > > (most commonly the soles) or putting split (ruptured) seams back
      > > together. They were members of two clearly separate and distinct
      > > guilds, and they had clearly defined parameters of functions.
      > >
      > > Yseult the Gentle
      > >
      >
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