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Re: [Italian Renaissance Costuming] The thing about embroidering is..

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  • Giuliana di Grazia
    You are a bad, bad woman Stephania. I could ve lived my life happy not having examples of Italian blackwork. Now I ve *gotta* learn how to do this so I can
    Message 1 of 31 , Feb 4, 2003
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      You are a bad, bad woman Stephania. I could've lived my life happy not having examples of Italian blackwork. Now I've *gotta* learn how to do this so I can decorate....stuff. <sigh>
      Giuliana (whose always looking for new hobbies)
      pppamr@... wrote:Speaking of Embroidery...I just had to share this site with such wonderful
      Italian Blackwork Patterns.

      <http://costume.dm.net/blackwork/italianpatterns.html>

      It takes a long time to load, because there are a lot of them....but so worth
      it!

      I think they would look lovely around a hem <grin>

      Stefania

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    • Denise Robello <drobello@netscape.net>
      ... I had this same sort of questions once, too. I think you need to take a look at what was happening in Italy at the time of interest. There s a lot of
      Message 31 of 31 , Feb 8, 2003
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        --- In Italian_Rennaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com, "Catherine de
        Gray <sister_dark_swan@y...>" <sister_dark_swan@y...> wrote:
        > --- In Italian_Rennaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com, Giuliana di
        > Grazia <juliana916@y...> wrote:
        >Question for y'all: I've only seen embroidery on
        > camicias, on the neckline and cuffs (?), and in one painting what
        > looked like embroidery on the hem of an underskirt
        > (http://www.fortunecity.com/lavender/sheppard/396/56d93ee0.jpg
        > Bacchiacca, details from St. John the Baptist, 1520) and on aprons.
        > Did they ever do embroidery on gowns at all?

        I had this same sort of questions once, too. I think you need to take
        a look at what was happening in Italy at the time of interest.
        There's a lot of political change going on throughout the northern
        part of the peninsula between 1490 and 1530.

        There was Savanrola in Florence along with the expulsion of the
        Medici; the rapid change-over of politically diametric Popes in Rome;
        the invasion by the Spanish, the French and the Holy Roman Empire
        into various parts of Italy. Then there's the sack of Rome in 1527-
        ish by both Spanish Catholics and German Protestants. The Italian
        city-states did not unite to protect their borders from the invaders.
        They used a lot of mercenaries to fight the invaders as well as each
        other. Pope Julius II (a Medici) led his own troops. When I consider
        the tapestry of events, I try to imagine what it was like to live in
        a wartime culture where exchange of information was shaky and news
        traveled slowly. The economy wouldn't have been stable, there would
        have been fear at the news of encroaching armies, and people may have
        been looking for reasons to turn in their neighbors as spies. The
        average person was Catholic and Rome wasn't that far away,
        particularly with the Pope sending forth his own troops. Threat of
        personal safety does weird things to people's brains; just look at
        what people allowed to happen to each other in both World Wars just
        to keep themselves and their families safe. I imagine that wearing
        clothes with elaborate decoration would have been like waving a red
        flag - it probably would have brought unwelcome attention. More than
        likely the small touches of embroidery at neck and cuffs were
        considered modest enough that they didn't draw undue attention.

        Food for Thought,
        Ascelin
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