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to corset or not to corset...

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  • Kat
    Hi... ... what era is your gown from. Corsets are more appropriate for the 16th century. I would probably do breast taping for a 15thcentury garment,
    Message 1 of 7 , Jan 4, 2007
      Hi...
      > I have a lovely gown to wear to an event in Mid-January, which has the
      > squared-off neckline and pointed waist, made in two parts (a bodice
      > and a skirt).

      what era is your gown from. Corsets are more appropriate for the 16th
      century. I would probably do 'breast taping' for a 15thcentury garment,
      personally.

      and
      >> of opening the top of the panel and inserting a sheet of heavy
      >> cardboard between the fabric and the liner, to stiffen just that
      >> panel.

      La Moda a Firenze and The Tudor Tailor (english though) put forward the
      theory of using cardboard or buckram in place of a corset, at least for the
      first half of the 15th century. This can be inserted into the bodice. As it
      is not washable, it needs to removed.
      At least with Florentine garb of the first half of the 16thc, a corset is
      less probable. Again, according to the authors of La Moda a Firenze,
      Eleanora d'Toledo did not own a corset. She wore material stiffened 'stays'
      that were not boned
      http://katerina.purplefiles.net/garb/diaries/Maria%20d'Medici%20underbodies.htm
      and most likely used ''cardboard' or buckram type stiffening to give the
      'straighter' effect.
      it was after the 1560s that corsets hit Florence generally....

      The bodice itself has four layers - outer, wool felt, a canvas like
      stiffened layer and the lining...
      http://katerina.purplefiles.net/garb/diaries/Linen%20Sottana%20with%20period%20techniques.html
      I have tried two of these but have yet to find some decent buckram to try
      the 'cardboard' thing....

      hope this helps.
      Kat.
      La Signora Onorata Katerina da Brescia
      Innilgard.
      The Purplefiles http://katerina.purplefiles.net

      "Life may not be the party we hoped for... but while we are here we might
      as well dance!"
    • Jessica Maxson
      ... Sorry, not to be nit-picky, but I think you mean the 16th century. =) Oh, and I m not sure if there s a problem with your server, but I couldn t pull up
      Message 2 of 7 , Jan 4, 2007
        Quoting Kat <katdb@...>:

        > La Moda a Firenze and The Tudor Tailor (english though) put forward the
        > theory of using cardboard or buckram in place of a corset, at least for the
        > first half of the 15th century.

        Sorry, not to be nit-picky, but I think you mean the 16th century. =)

        Oh, and I'm not sure if there's a problem with your server, but I
        couldn't pull up the URLs in your email. I know I've been to your site
        before, so it looks like something is not quite working right. Just FYI.

        --Giuliana
      • caitlin_oduibhir
        She wore material stiffened stays ... http://katerina.purplefiles.net/garb/diaries/Maria%20d Medici%20underbodies.htm ... the ... Which works. I have used it
        Message 3 of 7 , Jan 4, 2007
          She wore material stiffened 'stays'
          > that were not boned
          >
          http://katerina.purplefiles.net/garb/diaries/Maria%20d'Medici%20underbodies.htm
          > and most likely used ''cardboard' or buckram type stiffening to give
          the
          > 'straighter' effect.

          Which works. I have used it in an Elizabethan styled wedding gown. The
          thing we have to consider with stiffening products in period is that
          they were likely to never wash outer garments like they would with
          undergarments. Outer wear was aired out, dusted, brushed or if really
          stained, spot washed and if it's an oil stain, fullers earth was
          rubbed into the stain then brushed away. That is the bulk of dry
          cleaning process in history. Underwear were made of more sturdy
          fabrics thus could take the beating, literally and the immersion into
          water.

          http://katerina.purplefiles.net/garb/diaries/Linen%20Sottana%20with%20period%20techniques.html
          > I have tried two of these but have yet to find some decent buckram
          to try
          > the 'cardboard' thing....

          Try hat buckram. I picked some up years ago, unfortunately the shop
          that I bought if from is out of business, so I really don't know where
          to get it from now.

          Salvi
        • Desideria di Norcia
          Actually, I received the fabulous book La Moda for Yule (a gift to myself) and that s where I read about using cardboard. My persona is supposed to be
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 4, 2007
            Actually, I received the fabulous book "La Moda" for Yule (a gift to myself) and that's where I read about using cardboard. My persona is supposed to be Florentine in 1552, so I thought it would be approapriate. I do have some double-thick cardboard, which was used to ship bottles of wine, which seems to be sturdy enough for the task. However, I will look into buckram at the local Hobby Lobby. Thanks.
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          • theaphx@aol.com
            I thought I had read about cardboard in Moda a Firenze but figured someone would bring it up. Since the event is upon upon her, I might recommend plastic
            Message 5 of 7 , Jan 4, 2007
              I thought I had read about cardboard in Moda a Firenze but figured someone would bring it up. Since the event is upon upon her, I might recommend plastic needlepoint canvas as a stopgap measure. I have used it before in hats instead of buckrum and the plus side is it's washable. If I were making a dress from the start, I doubt I would use it, but it may work for a quick fix if there isn't time to make and properly fit a corset.

              - Dorothea

              PS: Just got to brag, I was recently in Florence and called the bookseller there that supposedly carries "La Moda". He said that he can't get it from the publisher anymore as they are sold out. I was panicked and upset, however, after ducking into almost every bookstore in the area I finally found it in a little hole in the wall for only 35 euro and the little proprietor gave me an extra book of Florentine fashion in art (in Italian) for free since I was so excited to find the book. I would have bought all she had at that price but it was her only copy (and it's mine).

              -----Original Message-----
              From: katdb@...
              To: Italian_Renaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thu, 4 Jan 2007 7:01 AM
              Subject: [Italian Renaissance Costuming] to corset or not to corset...


              > I have a lovely gown to wear to an event in Mid-January, which has the
              > squared-off neckline and pointed waist, made in two parts (a bodice
              > and a skirt).

              >> of opening the top of the panel and inserting a sheet of heavy
              >> cardboard between the fabric and the liner, to stiffen just that
              >> panel.

              La Moda a Firenze and The Tudor Tailor (english though) put forward the
              theory of using cardboard or buckram in place of a corset, at least for the
              first half of the 15th century. This can be inserted into the bodice. As it
              is not washable, it needs to removed.
              or buckram type stiffening to give the
              'straighter' effect.
              it was after the 1560s that corsets hit Florence generally....
              ________________________________________________________________________
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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Susan B. Farmer
              Quoting theaphx@aol.com: *snip* ... OOoh. Details on the freebie book. Who cares what language it s in as long as it has spiffy pictures! jerusha ... Susan
              Message 6 of 7 , Jan 4, 2007
                Quoting theaphx@...:

                *snip*

                >
                > PS: Just got to brag, I was recently in Florence and called the
                > bookseller there that supposedly carries "La Moda". He said that he
                > can't get it from the publisher anymore as they are sold out. I
                > was panicked and upset, however, after ducking into almost every
                > bookstore in the area I finally found it in a little hole in the
                > wall for only 35 euro and the little proprietor gave me an extra
                > book of Florentine fashion in art (in Italian) for free since I was
                > so excited to find the book. I would have bought all she had at
                > that price but it was her only copy (and it's mine).
                >

                OOoh. Details on the freebie book. Who cares what language it's in
                as long as it has spiffy pictures!

                jerusha
                -----
                Susan Farmer
                sfarmer@...
                University of Tennessee
                Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
                http://www.goldsword.com/sfarmer/Trillium/
              • Arianna Steffia dOvste
                I have also hear of folks using plastic tubbies as a resource, again easy to find (usally a cheap one is $5) and washable-though I am not sure how well it
                Message 7 of 7 , Jan 4, 2007
                  I have also hear of folks using plastic tubbies as a resource, again easy to find (usally a
                  cheap one is $5) and washable-though I am not sure how well it holds up to a dryer...
                  Also, very lightweight and thin-though quite rigid.
                  -arianna
                  --- In Italian_Renaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com, theaphx@... wrote:
                  >
                  > I thought I had read about cardboard in Moda a Firenze but figured someone would
                  bring it up. Since the event is upon upon her, I might recommend plastic needlepoint
                  canvas as a stopgap measure. I have used it before in hats instead of buckrum and the
                  plus side is it's washable. If I were making a dress from the start, I doubt I would use it,
                  but it may work for a quick fix if there isn't time to make and properly fit a corset.
                  >
                  > - Dorothea
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