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Re: Partlet/Bodice Question

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  • Karen Finnemore
    Thank you for all of your insight! I have not seen another gown with the partlet on the outside like this (if anyone has other examples, please share!!)
    Message 1 of 19 , Dec 1, 2006
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      Thank you for all of your insight! I have not seen another gown with the
      partlet on the outside like this (if anyone has other examples, please
      share!!) Sometimes my 3D thinking just doesn't work when I'm trying to
      figure out the dynamics of a piece! It just seemed to me that it had to be
      tied or weighted or something for practicality's sake.

      Lady Renata the posh rot

      On 11/30/06, Karen Finnemore <ladyren@...> wrote:
      >
      > http://www.renaissancewoman.net/realmofvenus/wardrobe/Venschunknown.jpg
      >
      > Can anyone give me a desciption of the make this partlet? I am wondering
      > how it might be attached to the bodice of the gown, or at least how it stays
      > in place?
      >
      > Lady Renata the posh rot
      >
      > --
      > "Perfect love is rare indeed - for to be a lover will require that you
      > continually have the subtlety of the very wise, the flexibility of the
      > child, the sensitivity of the artist, the understanding of the philosopher,
      > the acceptance of the saint, the tolerance of the scholar and the fortitude
      > of the certain." Leo Buscaglia




      --
      "Perfect love is rare indeed - for to be a lover will require that you
      continually have the subtlety of the very wise, the flexibility of the
      child, the sensitivity of the artist, the understanding of the philosopher,
      the acceptance of the saint, the tolerance of the scholar and the fortitude
      of the certain." Leo Buscaglia


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Elizabeth Caldwell
      http://www.tudor-portraits.com/LauraPola.jpg It s not quite the same thing but the portrait does have a partlet/shawl thingy. I honestly don t know what to
      Message 2 of 19 , Dec 1, 2006
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        http://www.tudor-portraits.com/LauraPola.jpg

        It's not quite the same thing but the portrait does have a partlet/shawl
        thingy. I honestly don't know what to call it but it goes over the
        shoulders and doesn't tuck into the dress so....

        -Isabella

        On 12/1/06, Karen Finnemore <ladyren@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thank you for all of your insight! I have not seen another gown with the
        > partlet on the outside like this (if anyone has other examples, please
        > share!!) Sometimes my 3D thinking just doesn't work when I'm trying to
        > figure out the dynamics of a piece! It just seemed to me that it had to be
        > tied or weighted or something for practicality's sake.
        >
        > Lady Renata the posh rot
        >
        > On 11/30/06, Karen Finnemore <ladyren@... <ladyren%40gmail.com>>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > http://www.renaissancewoman.net/realmofvenus/wardrobe/Venschunknown.jpg
        > >
        > > Can anyone give me a desciption of the make this partlet? I am wondering
        > > how it might be attached to the bodice of the gown, or at least how it
        > stays
        > > in place?
        > >
        > > Lady Renata the posh rot
        > >
        > > --
        > > "Perfect love is rare indeed - for to be a lover will require that you
        > > continually have the subtlety of the very wise, the flexibility of the
        > > child, the sensitivity of the artist, the understanding of the
        > philosopher,
        > > the acceptance of the saint, the tolerance of the scholar and the
        > fortitude
        > > of the certain." Leo Buscaglia
        >
        > --
        > "Perfect love is rare indeed - for to be a lover will require that you
        > continually have the subtlety of the very wise, the flexibility of the
        > child, the sensitivity of the artist, the understanding of the
        > philosopher,
        > the acceptance of the saint, the tolerance of the scholar and the
        > fortitude
        > of the certain." Leo Buscaglia
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Alexandria Doyle
        Mary Tudor was apparently fond of wearing a partlet that matched her gown, but was secured over her gown, not tucked into the bodice. I think that I would
        Message 3 of 19 , Dec 1, 2006
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          Mary Tudor was apparently fond of wearing a partlet that matched her gown,
          but was secured over her gown, not tucked into the bodice. I think that I
          would call this a partlet as well, since it's purpose is to cover the open
          shoulders when the gown's neckline is that open, whether it goes inside or
          outside of the bodice.

          alex,
          use to doing more English than Italian, but most of it interrelates.


          On 12/1/06, Elizabeth Caldwell <isabelladangelo@...> wrote:
          >
          > http://www.tudor-portraits.com/LauraPola.jpg
          >
          > It's not quite the same thing but the portrait does have a partlet/shawl
          > thingy. I honestly don't know what to call it but it goes over the
          > shoulders and doesn't tuck into the dress so....
          >
          > -Isabella
          >
          > On 12/1/06, Karen Finnemore <ladyren@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Thank you for all of your insight! I have not seen another gown with
          > the
          > > partlet on the outside like this (if anyone has other examples, please
          > > share!!) Sometimes my 3D thinking just doesn't work when I'm trying to
          > > figure out the dynamics of a piece! It just seemed to me that it had to
          > be
          > > tied or weighted or something for practicality's sake.
          > >
          > > Lady Renata the posh rot
          > >
          > > On 11/30/06, Karen Finnemore <ladyren@... <ladyren%40gmail.com>>
          > > wrote:
          > > >
          > > >
          > http://www.renaissancewoman.net/realmofvenus/wardrobe/Venschunknown.jpg
          > > >
          > > > Can anyone give me a desciption of the make this partlet? I am
          > wondering
          > > > how it might be attached to the bodice of the gown, or at least how it
          > > stays
          > > > in place?
          > > >
          > > > Lady Renata the posh rot
          > > >
          > > > --
          > > > "Perfect love is rare indeed - for to be a lover will require that you
          > > > continually have the subtlety of the very wise, the flexibility of the
          > > > child, the sensitivity of the artist, the understanding of the
          > > philosopher,
          > > > the acceptance of the saint, the tolerance of the scholar and the
          > > fortitude
          > > > of the certain." Leo Buscaglia
          > >
          > > --
          > > "Perfect love is rare indeed - for to be a lover will require that you
          > > continually have the subtlety of the very wise, the flexibility of the
          > > child, the sensitivity of the artist, the understanding of the
          > > philosopher,
          > > the acceptance of the saint, the tolerance of the scholar and the
          > > fortitude
          > > of the certain." Leo Buscaglia
          > >
          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Satine De La Courcel
          Beeading .. hmmmm.... here is what I think along those lines... I thought of it as possibly Goldwork of some type with pearls/Gemstones at the cross
          Message 4 of 19 , Dec 2, 2006
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            Beeading .. hmmmm.... here is what I think along those lines... I thought
            of it as possibly "Goldwork" of some type with pearls/Gemstones at the cross
            sections. that would have been common.. It looks way too "stiff" to be
            ribbon. a "type of "chain" maybe. Possibly a Gold band gemstone Netted
            partlet? maybe linked together? or soldered? It could also even be gold
            "beads" and pearls/Gemstones in Fillifree at the cross sections... I need a
            better pic with a clear closeup. to really be able to say more.... I love
            the nettting effect!

            It does look to me to be a part of the actual gown. definatley attached the
            way it forms exactally to the gown as if an adornment piece specifically
            made for this garment! Suggests to me that is is meant to be attached to at
            the very least front... Can not see the back back.. I would also suggest
            that it was attached at the very least to the back shoulder area and across
            teh top back of the gown in back for ease of movement, and not all the way
            down in back.. but that is complete guesswork. IMO

            that is what I thnk!

            cheers
            Satine

            _________________________________________________________________
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          • otsisto
            My take on it. It is not a part of the main gown but pinned to the gown. Nor is it connected to the belt. Partlets can be found outside of the gown in few
            Message 5 of 19 , Dec 2, 2006
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              My take on it.
              It is not a part of the main gown but pinned to the gown. Nor is it
              connected to the belt.
              Partlets can be found outside of the gown in few paintings.
              This one was presented before
              http://www.renaissancewoman.net/realmofvenus/wardrobe/LauraDaPola.JPG
              To me this seems to be a combination of a partlet and shawl.
              Is this what people are thinking of when they say ribbons with pearls/gems
              at the cross section?
              http://festiveattyre.com/research/secondflor/secflor13.html
              Though it is possible to be a ribbon and bead at cross section it doesn't
              look like it. I am more inclined to believe that it may be "goldwork" or
              some form of net lace. The center of the flowers do not "shimmer" as if they
              were beads.
              I disagree that it is to stiff to be ribbon. Pinning the "netting" to the
              gown and sort of stretch the netting across would give it a somewhat "stiff"
              look.
              De
            • Debbie Armstrong
              do you have a date, or artist on that painting? reason I ask is that the pose, and the whole feel of the portrait look more Victorian than Renn to me....the
              Message 6 of 19 , Dec 2, 2006
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                do you have a date, or artist on that painting?

                reason I ask is that the pose, and the whole feel of the portrait look more
                Victorian than Renn to me....the victorians had this phase of "OH golly, the
                rennaissance was SOOOOOO romantic and wonderful....." stage and there was a
                LOT of imitative art.

                d'Carnivalle

                ----Original Message Follows----
                From: "Elizabeth Caldwell" <isabelladangelo@...>
                Reply-To: Italian_Renaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com
                To: Italian_Renaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [Italian Renaissance Costuming] Re: Partlet/Bodice Question
                Date: Fri, 1 Dec 2006 20:07:50 -0500

                http://www.tudor-portraits.com/LauraPola.jpg

                It's not quite the same thing but the portrait does have a partlet/shawl
                thingy. I honestly don't know what to call it but it goes over the
                shoulders and doesn't tuck into the dress so....

                -Isabella

                On 12/1/06, Karen Finnemore <ladyren@...> wrote:
                >
                > Thank you for all of your insight! I have not seen another gown with
                the
                > partlet on the outside like this (if anyone has other examples, please
                > share!!) Sometimes my 3D thinking just doesn't work when I'm trying to
                > figure out the dynamics of a piece! It just seemed to me that it had to
                be
                > tied or weighted or something for practicality's sake.
                >
                > Lady Renata the posh rot
                >
                > On 11/30/06, Karen Finnemore <ladyren@... <ladyren%40gmail.com>>
                > wrote:
                > >
                > > http://www.renaissancewoman.net/realmofvenus/wardrobe/Venschunknown.jpg
                > >
                > > Can anyone give me a desciption of the make this partlet? I am
                wondering
                > > how it might be attached to the bodice of the gown, or at least how it
                > stays
                > > in place?
                > >
                > > Lady Renata the posh rot
                > >
                > > --
                > > "Perfect love is rare indeed - for to be a lover will require that you
                > > continually have the subtlety of the very wise, the flexibility of the
                > > child, the sensitivity of the artist, the understanding of the
                > philosopher,
                > > the acceptance of the saint, the tolerance of the scholar and the
                > fortitude
                > > of the certain." Leo Buscaglia
                >
                > --
                > "Perfect love is rare indeed - for to be a lover will require that you
                > continually have the subtlety of the very wise, the flexibility of the
                > child, the sensitivity of the artist, the understanding of the
                > philosopher,
                > the acceptance of the saint, the tolerance of the scholar and the
                > fortitude
                > of the certain." Leo Buscaglia
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Karen Finnemore
                Lorenzo Lotto, 1544. You can also find this painting on the Realm of Venus site, directly under the first picture that I had posted : ) Renata the posh rot
                Message 7 of 19 , Dec 2, 2006
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                  Lorenzo Lotto, 1544. You can also find this painting on the Realm of Venus
                  site, directly under the first picture that I had posted : )

                  Renata the posh rot

                  On 12/2/06, Debbie Armstrong <dcarnivalle@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > do you have a date, or artist on that painting?
                  >
                  > reason I ask is that the pose, and the whole feel of the portrait look
                  > more
                  > Victorian than Renn to me....the victorians had this phase of "OH golly,
                  > the
                  > rennaissance was SOOOOOO romantic and wonderful....." stage and there was
                  > a
                  > LOT of imitative art.
                  >
                  > d'Carnivalle
                  >
                  > -
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • otsisto
                  ... do you have a date, or artist on that painting? reason I ask is that the pose, and the whole feel of the portrait look more
                  Message 8 of 19 , Dec 2, 2006
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                    -----Original Message-----
                    do you have a date, or artist on that painting?

                    reason I ask is that the pose, and the whole feel of the portrait look more
                    <<<<<<<Victorian than Renn to me....the victorians had this phase of "OH
                    golly, the rennaissance was SOOOOOO romantic and wonderful....." stage and
                    there was a
                    LOT of imitative art.
                    d'Carnivalle>>>>>>>>

                    Lorenzo Lotto, 1544: Portrait of Laura da Pola

                    There are several portraits that look Victorian but are not.
                    Paolo Caliari (Veronese), 1560-70: Portrait of a Lady with a Dog
                    http://www.renaissancewoman.net/realmofvenus/wardrobe/Veronese1560.jpg
                    Giovanni Battista Moroni, c1560s: Portrait of Angelica Agliardi De Nicolinis
                    http://www.renaissancewoman.net/realmofvenus/wardrobe/MORONINicolinis.jpg
                    Paris Bordone, 1530s(?): Portrait Of A Woman Holding a Handkerchief
                    http://www.renaissancewoman.net/realmofvenus/wardrobe/BordoneHandkerchief.jp
                    g

                    De
                  • Satine De La Courcel
                    Your picture of Elanor of Toledo Is one of my favs! but as for Pearls/Gems no that is not exactally what I was talking about. this pic we are discussingis new
                    Message 9 of 19 , Dec 2, 2006
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                      Your picture of Elanor of Toledo Is one of my favs! but as for Pearls/Gems
                      no that is not exactally what I was talking about. this pic we are
                      discussingis new to me! and I love it! I do think that the partlet is
                      attached to teh gown itself. when I mean stiff I mean the way "chain" or
                      beaded nnettings compared to ribbon. it does not look to be "soft" like it
                      would be comfortable with much moveabiliyt(sp?) as in the Elamor picture
                      you listed. Stiff was probably not the best wors use.. but it is all I could
                      think of... How about the partlet to me looks to me to [possibly be of gold
                      beads and pearls N not as flexible ribbon for movement??? Does this make
                      sense??? I can picture it in my head but am at a loss for words!

                      _________________________________________________________________
                      Enter the "Telus Mobility Xbox a Day" contest for your chance to WIN! Telus
                      Mobility is giving away an Microsoft Xbox� 360 every day from November 20 to
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                    • Elizabeth Caldwell
                      Yeap! Laura da Pola by Lorenzo Lotto, 1544. (Pinacoteca di Brera, Milan) There is more info on the painting here:
                      Message 10 of 19 , Dec 4, 2006
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                        Yeap! Laura da Pola by Lorenzo Lotto, 1544. (Pinacoteca di Brera, Milan)

                        There is more info on the painting here:
                        http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/html/l/lotto/1531-/070pola.html

                        -Isabella

                        On 12/2/06, Debbie Armstrong <dcarnivalle@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > do you have a date, or artist on that painting?
                        >
                        > reason I ask is that the pose, and the whole feel of the portrait look
                        > more
                        > Victorian than Renn to me....the victorians had this phase of "OH golly,
                        > the
                        > rennaissance was SOOOOOO romantic and wonderful....." stage and there was
                        > a
                        > LOT of imitative art.
                        >
                        > d'Carnivalle
                        >
                        > ----Original Message Follows----
                        > From: "Elizabeth Caldwell" <isabelladangelo@...<isabelladangelo%40gmail.com>
                        > >
                        > Reply-To: Italian_Renaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com<Italian_Renaissance_Costuming%40yahoogroups.com>
                        > To: Italian_Renaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com<Italian_Renaissance_Costuming%40yahoogroups.com>
                        > Subject: Re: [Italian Renaissance Costuming] Re: Partlet/Bodice Question
                        > Date: Fri, 1 Dec 2006 20:07:50 -0500
                        >
                        > http://www.tudor-portraits.com/LauraPola.jpg
                        >
                        > It's not quite the same thing but the portrait does have a partlet/shawl
                        > thingy. I honestly don't know what to call it but it goes over the
                        > shoulders and doesn't tuck into the dress so....
                        >
                        > -Isabella
                        >
                        > On 12/1/06, Karen Finnemore <ladyren@... <ladyren%40gmail.com>>
                        > wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Thank you for all of your insight! I have not seen another gown with
                        > the
                        > > partlet on the outside like this (if anyone has other examples, please
                        > > share!!) Sometimes my 3D thinking just doesn't work when I'm trying to
                        > > figure out the dynamics of a piece! It just seemed to me that it had to
                        > be
                        > > tied or weighted or something for practicality's sake.
                        > >
                        > > Lady Renata the posh rot
                        > >
                        > > On 11/30/06, Karen Finnemore <ladyren@... <ladyren%40gmail.com><ladyren%40gmail.com>>
                        > > wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > http://www.renaissancewoman.net/realmofvenus/wardrobe/Venschunknown.jpg
                        > > >
                        > > > Can anyone give me a desciption of the make this partlet? I am
                        > wondering
                        > > > how it might be attached to the bodice of the gown, or at least how it
                        > > stays
                        > > > in place?
                        > > >
                        > > > Lady Renata the posh rot
                        > > >
                        > > > --
                        > > > "Perfect love is rare indeed - for to be a lover will require that you
                        > > > continually have the subtlety of the very wise, the flexibility of the
                        > > > child, the sensitivity of the artist, the understanding of the
                        > > philosopher,
                        > > > the acceptance of the saint, the tolerance of the scholar and the
                        > > fortitude
                        > > > of the certain." Leo Buscaglia
                        > >
                        > > --
                        > > "Perfect love is rare indeed - for to be a lover will require that you
                        > > continually have the subtlety of the very wise, the flexibility of the
                        > > child, the sensitivity of the artist, the understanding of the
                        > > philosopher,
                        > > the acceptance of the saint, the tolerance of the scholar and the
                        > > fortitude
                        > > of the certain." Leo Buscaglia
                        > >
                        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        >


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Debbie Armstrong
                        Cool. Glad to be wrong. Interesting pose tho, and the painter s perspective is interesting as well. Every other portrait of the period that I ve ever seen has
                        Message 11 of 19 , Dec 9, 2006
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                          Cool. Glad to be wrong.

                          Interesting pose tho, and the painter's perspective is interesting as well.
                          Every other portrait of the period that I've ever seen has the subject
                          either on the same level [we are equal] as the painter, or slightly above
                          [paint, you insect!] the painter...

                          Even in portraits where the subject is seated, that perspective is
                          maintained...there would be either a riser under the subject's chair...or
                          the painter would back off a bit. Shoot, for that insipid 4 yr old Infanta,
                          the painter was at the other end of the room! and it wasn't just to show
                          off the furniture.

                          Back to the pose, Painter and Subject often used poses as "unwritten
                          commentary". This pose tells the world that I am a mighty King....a
                          soldier...a loving mother...a banker who can buy and sell all of you. In
                          the Infanta's pose, I've always been struck, not by the opulence, but by how
                          lonely that little girl looks.

                          Be interesting to know more about Laura da Pola, and about Lorenzo Lotto...

                          d'Carnivalle

                          ----Original Message Follows----
                          From: "Elizabeth Caldwell" <isabelladangelo@...>
                          Reply-To: Italian_Renaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com
                          To: Italian_Renaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: Re: [Italian Renaissance Costuming] Re: Partlet/Bodice Question
                          Date: Mon, 4 Dec 2006 15:14:37 -0500

                          Yeap! Laura da Pola by Lorenzo Lotto, 1544. (Pinacoteca di Brera, Milan)

                          There is more info on the painting here:
                          http://www.wga.hu/frames-e.html?/html/l/lotto/1531-/070pola.html

                          -Isabella

                          On 12/2/06, Debbie Armstrong <dcarnivalle@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > do you have a date, or artist on that painting?
                          >
                          > reason I ask is that the pose, and the whole feel of the portrait look
                          > more
                          > Victorian than Renn to me....the victorians had this phase of "OH golly,
                          > the
                          > rennaissance was SOOOOOO romantic and wonderful....." stage and there was
                          > a
                          > LOT of imitative art.
                          >
                          > d'Carnivalle
                          >
                          > ----Original Message Follows----
                          > From: "Elizabeth Caldwell"
                          <isabelladangelo@...<isabelladangelo%40gmail.com>
                          > >
                          > Reply-To:
                          Italian_Renaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com<Italian_Renaissance_Costuming%40yahoogroups.com>
                          > To:
                          Italian_Renaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com<Italian_Renaissance_Costuming%40yahoogroups.com>
                          > Subject: Re: [Italian Renaissance Costuming] Re: Partlet/Bodice Question
                          > Date: Fri, 1 Dec 2006 20:07:50 -0500
                          >
                          > http://www.tudor-portraits.com/LauraPola.jpg
                          >
                          > It's not quite the same thing but the portrait does have a partlet/shawl
                          > thingy. I honestly don't know what to call it but it goes over the
                          > shoulders and doesn't tuck into the dress so....
                          >
                          > -Isabella
                          >
                          > On 12/1/06, Karen Finnemore <ladyren@... <ladyren%40gmail.com>>
                          > wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Thank you for all of your insight! I have not seen another gown with
                          > the
                          > > partlet on the outside like this (if anyone has other examples, please
                          > > share!!) Sometimes my 3D thinking just doesn't work when I'm trying to
                          > > figure out the dynamics of a piece! It just seemed to me that it had to
                          > be
                          > > tied or weighted or something for practicality's sake.
                          > >
                          > > Lady Renata the posh rot
                          > >
                          > > On 11/30/06, Karen Finnemore <ladyren@...
                          <ladyren%40gmail.com><ladyren%40gmail.com>>
                          > > wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > http://www.renaissancewoman.net/realmofvenus/wardrobe/Venschunknown.jpg
                          > > >
                          > > > Can anyone give me a desciption of the make this partlet? I am
                          > wondering
                          > > > how it might be attached to the bodice of the gown, or at least how
                          it
                          > > stays
                          > > > in place?
                          > > >
                          > > > Lady Renata the posh rot
                          > > >
                          > > > --
                          > > > "Perfect love is rare indeed - for to be a lover will require that
                          you
                          > > > continually have the subtlety of the very wise, the flexibility of
                          the
                          > > > child, the sensitivity of the artist, the understanding of the
                          > > philosopher,
                          > > > the acceptance of the saint, the tolerance of the scholar and the
                          > > fortitude
                          > > > of the certain." Leo Buscaglia
                          > >
                          > > --
                          > > "Perfect love is rare indeed - for to be a lover will require that you
                          > > continually have the subtlety of the very wise, the flexibility of the
                          > > child, the sensitivity of the artist, the understanding of the
                          > > philosopher,
                          > > the acceptance of the saint, the tolerance of the scholar and the
                          > > fortitude
                          > > of the certain." Leo Buscaglia
                          > >
                          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >
                          >


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Debbie Armstrong
                          Thought some of you might be interested in this, so I did a bit of copy & Paste Now, time to start counting pennies . . . Damietta d Carnivalle Antir Join
                          Message 12 of 19 , Feb 13, 2008
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                            Thought some of you might be interested in this, so I did a bit of "copy & Paste"
                            Now, time to start counting pennies . . .

                            Damietta d'Carnivalle
                            Antir


                            Join the CostumeTalk gang April 12-13, 2008 for a weekend focusing on the
                            Elizabethan Era. We'll be hosting Drea Leed, independent scholar and owner
                            of The Elizabethan Costume Page (www.elizabethancostume.net)! Two full days
                            of lectures, capped off with two limited-attendance hands-on workshops at
                            the Center for Meeting and Learning on the Lane Community College campus in
                            Eugene, Oregon.

                            Ms. Leed has studied Renaissance clothing and textiles for over ten years.
                            She's presented papers at the International Congress of Medieval Studies at
                            Kalamazoo and the Medieval Congress at Leeds, England. Ms. Leed has given
                            several talks and seminars on the topic of Renaissance and Elizabethan dress
                            for various groups, and taught a six-week class on Elizabethan Dress at the
                            CostumeClassroom.com.

                            Among Ms. Leed's published works is "The Well-Dress'd Peasant: 16th Century
                            Workingwoman's Dress."

                            Saturday, April 12:
                            Introduction and General Survey of Tudor and Elizabethan Dress (1.5 hrs)
                            Discussion of available sources/books (30 minutes)
                            General Q&A on Tudor and Elizabethan clothing (about 15 minutes, or longer
                            if necessary)
                            Lunch (1 hour break, lunch provided)
                            Overview of Elizabethan Underpinnings- corset, bumroll and farthingale (1
                            hour)
                            Demonstration: how to make a corset (30 minutes)
                            ~~End of Regular Session, 1 hour break

                            **Saturday Workshop: Making a Custom Corset Pattern (1 hour+)
                            This hands-on workshop is limited to 20 students. All materials are included
                            in the registration.(Only 11 seats remaining)
                            Students will learn the basics of measuring and drafting corset pattern,
                            taking home a paper pattern suitable for constructing their own corset.
                            After drafting is complete, Dress up! Any attendees who wish to can try on a
                            variety of corsets.

                            Evening Social with Drea Leed
                            Information TBA at lecture

                            Sunday, April 13:

                            The Perfect Gown: Making an outfit that's right for you: Choosing patterns,
                            fabrics, colors, decoration and detailing, general construction tips, good
                            sources, accessories (2 hours, with a 10 minute break)
                            Lunch (1 hour break, lunch provided)
                            Tudor and Elizabethan Headwear and Hairstyles (1 hour)
                            Demo: Making a French Hood & Elizabethan Coif (30 minutes)

                            End of Regular Session, 1 hour break

                            **Sunday Workshop: Make an Elizabethan coif (2 hours)(only 11 seats
                            remaining)
                            This hands-on workshop is limited to 20 students. All materials are included
                            in the registration.
                            Students will draft, cut and construct a linen Elizabethan Coif.

                            Registration and more information can be found at www.costumetalk.com!

                            The price of the two days of lectures is $80, with lunch included in both days.
                            The corset workshop is $20, and the Coif Workshop is $30 (materials included).

                            So there ya go. Location, etc is available on the website
                            (www.costumetalk.com). We're also trying to match folks up with
                            crash space to help with the costs.

                            Please note, this is *not* an SCA event, nor is it sponsored by any SCA
                            branch. Just two crazy costumers, wanting to share!

                            Thanks!
                            Dame Fearga Kavanagh
                            Dame Karis Jessica Pursey
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