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Re: [Italian Renaissance Costuming] Men's giornea (sp?)

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  • Jessica Maxson
    Salve Giudo! I haven t looked too closely at the men s giornea (yet!) so I don t recall whether I ve seen what you describe. Could you post some links to pics
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 6, 2004
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      Salve Giudo!

      I haven't looked too closely at the men's giornea (yet!) so I don't recall
      whether I've seen what you describe. Could you post some links to pics that
      show it so we can look too? One possibility for getting the pleats to stay
      even with a slit is that they could be tacked down to a tape that runs along
      the inside. I have seen an example in this in a painting by.... I want to
      say Lotto but I'm not sure. I'll have to see if I can dig it up again.

      Ciao!
      --Giuliana

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: <giudo@...>
      To: "Italian Rennaissance Cost"
      <Italian_Rennaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Friday, December 03, 2004 4:30 PM
      Subject: [Italian Renaissance Costuming] Men's giornea (sp?)


      >
      > Just a curiosity if others have seen this as well and/or have an idea on
      > how to
      > accomplish this in the patterning:
      >
      > But if one uses the "rule of three" when it comes to paintings (ie: three
      > separate paintings, preferably by more than one artist...then it's more
      > than
      > likely true): I've noticed that in the men's giornea (sp?) that in at
      > least a
      > half-dozen paintings I've looked at, it appears that the giornea is
      > seamless
      > except on the side under the arms and has a slit on the front that runs
      > down to
      > about mid-chest (and usually lined with fur).
      >
      > 1) Has anyone else seen this?
      > 2) How is this able to be duplicated (my question aims more at...how do
      > you get
      > a slit to open like that without loosening the tight pleats seen)?
      >
      >
      > --
      > In servizio della parte superiore, del regno e della societa,
      > Giudo di Niccolo Brunelleschi
      > Shire of Deodar, Kingdom of Calontir
      > Pursuivant & 15th Century Florentine
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • giudo@mchsi.com
      I ll have to pull my notes on this once I get home again. I ve got a list of the specific paintings I was looking at. I ll send that out as soon as I have a
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 6, 2004
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        I'll have to pull my notes on this once I get home again. I've got a list of the
        specific paintings I was looking at. I'll send that out as soon as I have a
        chance (albeit it'll be MUCH later tonight since we have our monthly business
        meeting tonight)...

        Until then,
        --
        In servizio della parte superiore, del regno e della societa,
        Giudo di Niccolo Brunelleschi
        Shire of Deodar, Kingdom of Calontir
        Pursuivant & 15th Century Florentine
      • giudo@mchsi.com
        Alrighty, here s the list of paintings that I m seeing this in: 1) Ottavio Vannini s Lorenzo de Medici and his Artists in the Sculpture Garden (1635) --
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 6, 2004
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          Alrighty, here's the list of paintings that I'm seeing this in:

          1) Ottavio Vannini's "Lorenzo de'Medici and his Artists in the Sculpture Garden"
          (1635) --> looking at the figure on the left in orange

          2) Gentile da Fabriano's "Adoration of the Magi" (1423) --> the kneeling 'king'
          at center

          3) Masaccio's "Tribute Money" (1427-28) --> the gentleman on the far right in
          red; not sure if this is a giornea or a different garment

          4) Fra Filippo Lippi's "Funeral of St. Stephen" (1460) --> the gentlemen of
          center to the right in black with the red hat; appears to be a half-slit as
          mentioned, but fully closed without visible closures

          5) Antonio and Piero del Pollaiuolo's "St. James Between Sts. Vincent and
          Eustace" (1467-68) --> St. Eustace (far right); appears to have visible clasps
          closing up the half-slit that I was mentioning

          6) Giorgione's "Three Philosophers" (1509-10) --> the center figure, standing in
          red; again, this looks like the half-slit with visible closures

          7) Loreno Lotto's "Susanna and the Elders" (1517) --> the central male figure
          holding the scroll in lavendar


          Now, like I've noted above, there appears to be some variation in the garment
          being left open and having visible closures. There are a couple of these
          paintings that I cannot tell for sure if these actually have the half-slit like
          I observed in some of the others, but they look fairly close. Anyone with
          comments, feedback?

          --
          In servizio della parte superiore, del regno e della societa,
          Giudo di Niccolo Brunelleschi
          Shire of Deodar, Kingdom of Calontir
          Pursuivant & 15th Century Florentine
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