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Re: Fabric choices?

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  • kitlizzy
    Ooh, I missed the upholstery backing on that one. Good catch! That would be extremly icky. Thanks for the look-see at them! :) -Elizabeth
    Message 1 of 21 , May 26, 2004
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      Ooh, I missed the upholstery backing on that one. Good catch! That
      would be extremly icky. Thanks for the look-see at them! :)

      -Elizabeth

      --- In Italian_Rennaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com, "Susan Griner"
      <susang45@j...> wrote:
      > Giving my humble opinion, because you did ask, and I will admit it's
      > worth what you paid for it
      >
      > --- In Italian_Rennaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com, "kitlizzy"
      > <kitliz001@h...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Striped blue Jacquard
      > > http://store.yahoo.com/phoenixtextiles/ua-414.html
      > I don't remember seeing anything like this in portraiture
      > > Layfetta Damask
      > > http://store.yahoo.com/phoenixtextiles/ua-331.html
      > This looks good and red was a popular color (clear winner!)
      > > Dunmard Jaquard
      > > http://store.yahoo.com/phoenixtextiles/ua-295.html
      > This says it has upholstery backing, is that the nasty rubberry
      > stuff? and I don't think the pattern looks right
      > > Drama Jaquard
      > > http://store.yahoo.com/phoenixtextiles/ua-312.html
      > This looks okay, but not as great as the Damask
      > Lucrezia
      > hope this does help :)
    • Janie
      Would thess be an appropriate fabric selection, in general, for lower class Italian dresses?
      Message 2 of 21 , Oct 19, 2005
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        Would thess be an appropriate fabric selection, in general, for "lower
        class" Italian dresses?

        http://www.fabrics-store.com/first.php?goto=big_fabric&menu=np&fabric_id=963

        http://www.fabrics-store.com/first.php?goto=big_fabric&menu=np&fabric_id=964

        http://www.fabrics-store.com/first.php?goto=big_fabric&menu=np&fabric_id=967


        I really don't care about a specific year, just wondering if you ladies and
        gents think it would be an obvious "No-No". I have "discovered" linen this
        year and would like to stick to layering linen for my first few "better than
        in my past" sewing ventures.

        Janie
        (who happens to LOVE this merchant)


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Catherine Rogers-Cook
        The first and third fabrics seem plausible for late 15th century gamurre and 16th century gamurre and vestiti, but I don t think I understand what you mean by
        Message 3 of 21 , Oct 19, 2005
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          The first and third fabrics seem plausible for late 15th century gamurre and 16th century gamurre and vestiti, but I don't think I understand what you mean by "lower class." All these fabrics are much too good for lower class people - that is until the garments made from them became too "sad" (old & worn) to be even every day clothing of the patricians and entered the used clothing markets where they would be worn and sold and worn and sold till the fabric was nothing but rags to be sold a final time to the rag merchants. There are several good manuals on stage costuming that give instructions for aging fabrics if you want a reak lower class look.

          Italy was really the first area of Europe to move to a money economy, so the process of moving from the poor artisan to merchant to rich merchant to nobility was moving well along by the 13th century (fueled by the textile trades) so that by the 16th century, a Medici girl could become Queen of France (and introduce all the elements of "fine living" that would soon be regarded as "French")

          In rural areas, the social classes were less flexible than in urban areas. Peasants ranged from dirt poor to reasonably prosperous. The better off peasants often apprenticed their "extra" sons into trades in towns. The landed aristocracy saw their economic base steadily erode (as elsewhere in Europe) and often resorted to mending the family fortunes by marrying the well dowered daughters of rich urban merchants, thus speeding up the process of integration of the rich merchant class and the aristocracy.

          The fabrics you have cited are perfect for the middle to upper rank of merchant class people for their good clothing and for patricians for "at home" clothes, which were much simpler and plainer than their finest "portrait and feast" clothes.

          Have fun making garb. I like the first fabric best

          I hope this is useful to you

          Dame Katharine of Cate Hall, O.Pel, O.L.



          Janie <janielee@...> wrote:
          Would thess be an appropriate fabric selection, in general, for "lower
          class" Italian dresses?

          http://www.fabrics-store.com/first.php?goto=big_fabric&menu=np&fabric_id=963

          http://www.fabrics-store.com/first.php?goto=big_fabric&menu=np&fabric_id=964

          http://www.fabrics-store.com/first.php?goto=big_fabric&menu=np&fabric_id=967


          I really don't care about a specific year, just wondering if you ladies and
          gents think it would be an obvious "No-No". I have "discovered" linen this
          year and would like to stick to layering linen for my first few "better than
          in my past" sewing ventures.

          Janie
          (who happens to LOVE this merchant)


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Laita da Padova
          As for Italian fabric selection, the 100% cotton is a nice modern compromise for period fabrics. The pattern on 2 and 3, I wouldn t recommend... I can t
          Message 4 of 21 , Oct 19, 2005
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            As for Italian fabric selection, the 100% cotton is a nice modern compromise for period fabrics. The pattern on 2 and 3, I wouldn't recommend... I can't recall seeing anything even closely resembling them. Fabric 1, is the closest to the patterns used, but even then it depends on how historically accurate you want to be. I'd recommend flipping through photos on Bella's site to get an idea of what motifs were used. Some of the images have a good view of the large-scale motifs, for example http://realmofvenus.renaissancewoman.net/wardrobe/PaolaPriuliQuerini.jpg but keep in mind that these are not lower class. Bella also compiled a gallery of motif images that may help you on your fabric quest. http://realmofvenus.renaissancewoman.net/seamstress/figuredfabrics.htm

            As for lower-class italian pictures, look at Jennifer Thompson's site. the fabrics depicted here are solids http://homepage.mac.com/festive_attyre/research/wkclass/portfolio.html

            -Laita

            Janie <janielee@...> wrote:
            Would thess be an appropriate fabric selection, in general, for "lower
            class" Italian dresses?

            http://www.fabrics-store.com/first.php?goto=big_fabric&menu=np&fabric_id=963

            http://www.fabrics-store.com/first.php?goto=big_fabric&menu=np&fabric_id=964

            http://www.fabrics-store.com/first.php?goto=big_fabric&menu=np&fabric_id=967

            ---------------------------------
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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Adele de Maisieres
            ... While I _like_ all of those fabrics, I don t think any of thm is especially appropriate for lower class clothing. The first one would be good for
            Message 5 of 21 , Oct 20, 2005
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              Janie wrote:

              >Would thess be an appropriate fabric selection, in general, for "lower
              >class" Italian dresses?
              >
              >http://www.fabrics-store.com/first.php?goto=big_fabric&menu=np&fabric_id=963
              >
              >http://www.fabrics-store.com/first.php?goto=big_fabric&menu=np&fabric_id=964
              >
              >http://www.fabrics-store.com/first.php?goto=big_fabric&menu=np&fabric_id=967
              >
              >
              >I really don't care about a specific year, just wondering if you ladies and
              >gents think it would be an obvious "No-No". I have "discovered" linen this
              >year and would like to stick to layering linen for my first few "better than
              >in my past" sewing ventures.
              >
              >
              >

              While I _like_ all of those fabrics, I don't think any of thm is
              especially appropriate for lower class clothing. The first one would be
              good for higher-class wear, but for lower class, he best thing would be
              wool fabric in a solid colour.

              --
              Adele de Maisieres

              -----------------------------
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