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Re: overgowns

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  • Lori Leppink
    Which painting are you refering to? There is an overgown called a giornea that Ghirlandaio shows in quite a few of his paintings that was open on the sides,
    Message 1 of 23 , Feb 2, 2004
      Which painting are you refering to? There is an overgown called a
      giornea that Ghirlandaio shows in quite a few of his paintings that
      was open on the sides, and sometimes in the front too. It is
      sleeveless and hangs loosely with no belt.

      Giovanna


      --- In Italian_Rennaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com, Susan Farmer
      <sfarmer@s...> wrote:
      >
      > I have a question about overgowns. Most of them seem to be open
      > in the front -- see any of Carpaccio's paintings. I am only
      > aware of the ghirlandaio portrait of an overgown that is open
      > on the sides. Is this the only example of this type of overgown?
      >
      > thanks,
      > Jerusha
    • Susan Farmer
      ... Yeah, that one. I couldn t remember the lady in the portrait s name. those two or three paintings of her all done by Ghirlandaio all show the same garb.
      Message 2 of 23 , Feb 3, 2004
        > Which painting are you refering to? There is an overgown called a
        > giornea that Ghirlandaio shows in quite a few of his paintings that
        > was open on the sides, and sometimes in the front too. It is
        > sleeveless and hangs loosely with no belt.

        Yeah, that one. I couldn't remember the lady in the portrait's
        name. those two or three paintings of her all done by Ghirlandaio
        all show the same garb. Are there any other examples of a giorna
        like that that's open on the sides?

        Thanks!
        Jerusha

        > --- In Italian_Rennaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com, Susan Farmer
        > <sfarmer@s...> wrote:
        > >
        > > I have a question about overgowns. Most of them seem to be open
        > > in the front -- see any of Carpaccio's paintings. I am only
        > > aware of the ghirlandaio portrait of an overgown that is open
        > > on the sides. Is this the only example of this type of overgown?
        > >
        > > thanks,
        > > Jerusha
        >
      • Kiara
        I actually have a theory that the giorneas in Ghirlandaio s portraits open in the front as well as the sides but are closed in front with hook and eyes (or
        Message 3 of 23 , Feb 3, 2004
          I actually have a theory that the giorneas in Ghirlandaio's portraits open in the front as well as the sides but are closed in front with hook and eyes (or possibly laced but what a pain!)

          If you look at Giovanna Tournabouni portrait http://cgfa.sunsite.dk/ghirlandaio/p-ghirlandaio13.htm where the front of the neckline meets is either a very thick seam or a closed opening. The shadow suggests a closed opening to me.

          The same with the other fresco http://cgfa.sunsite.dk/ghirlandaio/p-ghirlandaio2.htm
          If you look under her hands there appears to be another thick seam which could be a closed opening. The plunge of the neckline especially lends itself to an opening in my mind. I could be totally off base though.

          --Kiara







          Susan Farmer <sfarmer@...> wrote:
          > Which painting are you refering to? There is an overgown called a
          > giornea that Ghirlandaio shows in quite a few of his paintings that
          > was open on the sides, and sometimes in the front too. It is
          > sleeveless and hangs loosely with no belt.

          Yeah, that one. I couldn't remember the lady in the portrait's
          name. those two or three paintings of her all done by Ghirlandaio
          all show the same garb. Are there any other examples of a giorna
          like that that's open on the sides?

          Thanks!
          Jerusha

          > --- In Italian_Rennaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com, Susan Farmer
          > <sfarmer@s...> wrote:
          > >
          > > I have a question about overgowns. Most of them seem to be open
          > > in the front -- see any of Carpaccio's paintings. I am only
          > > aware of the ghirlandaio portrait of an overgown that is open
          > > on the sides. Is this the only example of this type of overgown?
          > >
          > > thanks,
          > > Jerusha
          >


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