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Many camice/camixe

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  • Donatello
    Today s Italian Lesson(in response to Ginevra s sub query) In period Tuscan(Florence) and modern Italian... camicia /kamEEcha/, 2+ camice /kamEEchay/.....In
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 1 8:57 AM
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      Today's Italian Lesson(in response to Ginevra's sub query)

      In period Tuscan(Florence) and modern Italian... camicia /kamEEcha/,
      2+ camice /kamEEchay/.....In Veneto(Venice), period and modern,
      camixa /kamEEza/, 2+ camixe /kamEEzay/...

      And now for the fun part....when the hard c /k/ is single and between
      2 vowels in period Tuscan(post 1400), it is pronounced like a
      guttural "ch" as in German "Bach" or Gaelic "Loch"...so 1
      camicia /una "ch"amEEcha/. In Modern Tuscan, "p", "t", and soft c
      have followed their /k/ siblings and become /f/, /th/, /sh/ in
      between vowels, and the 'ch' is softened to the English "h"
      sound...so a modern Florentine says /una hamEEsha/...

      and even Funner...Standard Italian is based on Dante's 1300's
      Florentine Tuscan...however, the Florentines didn't stop evolving
      their speech and it has changed quite a bit...But because the
      Florentines "know" that their dialect was the base for Standard
      Italian, therefore anything that comes out of their mouths
      is "Perfect Italian", regardless of 500 years of language change on
      their part only!!! This attitude frosts other Italians.

      ...Donatello
    • Chiara Fagni/Kiara/Ciar
      That was cool. Thank you for the language lesson. --Kiara Donatello wrote: Today s Italian Lesson(in response to Ginevra s sub
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 1 11:24 AM
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        That was cool. Thank you for the language lesson.

        --Kiara



        Donatello <integratedtube@...> wrote:
        Today's Italian Lesson(in response to Ginevra's sub query)

        In period Tuscan(Florence) and modern Italian... camicia /kamEEcha/,
        2+ camice /kamEEchay/.....In Veneto(Venice), period and modern,
        camixa /kamEEza/, 2+ camixe /kamEEzay/...

        And now for the fun part....when the hard c /k/ is single and between
        2 vowels in period Tuscan(post 1400), it is pronounced like a
        guttural "ch" as in German "Bach" or Gaelic "Loch"...so 1
        camicia /una "ch"amEEcha/. In Modern Tuscan, "p", "t", and soft c
        have followed their /k/ siblings and become /f/, /th/, /sh/ in
        between vowels, and the 'ch' is softened to the English "h"
        sound...so a modern Florentine says /una hamEEsha/...

        and even Funner...Standard Italian is based on Dante's 1300's
        Florentine Tuscan...however, the Florentines didn't stop evolving
        their speech and it has changed quite a bit...But because the
        Florentines "know" that their dialect was the base for Standard
        Italian, therefore anything that comes out of their mouths
        is "Perfect Italian", regardless of 500 years of language change on
        their part only!!! This attitude frosts other Italians.

        ...Donatello


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      • Gerita
        Ah, Donatello, amoré! This is just exactly what i ve been looking for! Anxiously awaiting the next lesson. Gerita, gratefully
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 1 12:56 PM
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          Ah, Donatello, amoré! This is just exactly what i've been looking for!
          Anxiously awaiting the next lesson.

          Gerita, gratefully
        • Donatello
          ... for! ... Carisima Gerita! Happy to teach what I know. Further lessons will come as necessary. I await only the queries....Donatello
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 2 11:14 AM
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            --- In Italian_Rennaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com, "Gerita"
            <hpockets@v...> wrote:
            > Ah, Donatello, amoré! This is just exactly what i've been looking
            for!
            > Anxiously awaiting the next lesson.
            >
            > Gerita, gratefully


            Carisima Gerita! Happy to teach what I know. Further lessons will
            come as necessary. I await only the queries....Donatello
          • Lori Leppink
            How would the name Giovanna Vernaccia be pronounced in 1470 Florence? I hate to not be able to say my own name! Giovanna ... camicia /kamEEcha/, ... between
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 3 3:38 PM
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              How would the name Giovanna Vernaccia be pronounced in 1470
              Florence? I hate to not be able to say my own name!

              Giovanna



              --- In Italian_Rennaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com, "Donatello"
              <integratedtube@h...> wrote:
              > Today's Italian Lesson(in response to Ginevra's sub query)
              >
              > In period Tuscan(Florence) and modern Italian...
              camicia /kamEEcha/,
              > 2+ camice /kamEEchay/.....In Veneto(Venice), period and modern,
              > camixa /kamEEza/, 2+ camixe /kamEEzay/...
              >
              > And now for the fun part....when the hard c /k/ is single and
              between
              > 2 vowels in period Tuscan(post 1400), it is pronounced like a
              > guttural "ch" as in German "Bach" or Gaelic "Loch"...so 1
              > camicia /una "ch"amEEcha/. In Modern Tuscan, "p", "t", and soft c
              > have followed their /k/ siblings and become /f/, /th/, /sh/ in
              > between vowels, and the 'ch' is softened to the English "h"
              > sound...so a modern Florentine says /una hamEEsha/...
              >
              > and even Funner...Standard Italian is based on Dante's 1300's
              > Florentine Tuscan...however, the Florentines didn't stop evolving
              > their speech and it has changed quite a bit...But because the
              > Florentines "know" that their dialect was the base for Standard
              > Italian, therefore anything that comes out of their mouths
              > is "Perfect Italian", regardless of 500 years of language change on
              > their part only!!! This attitude frosts other Italians.
              >
              > ...Donatello
            • Mary Bader Montgomery
              ... Jo-VON-na Vair-NOTCH-ya Mary Taran Who spent a full year studying medieval and Renaissance art at the Universita degli Studi di Firenze and was a
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 3 8:21 PM
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                At 10:38 PM 7/3/03 +0000, you wrote:
                >How would the name Giovanna Vernaccia be pronounced in 1470
                >Florence? I hate to not be able to say my own name!
                >
                >Giovanna

                "Jo-VON-na Vair-NOTCH-ya"

                Mary Taran
                Who spent a full year studying medieval and Renaissance art at the
                Universita degli Studi di Firenze and was a founding member of what
                eventually became Drachenwald. Yes, that was fabulous.

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Lori Leppink
                Thanks a million! Giovanna
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 7 10:58 AM
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                  Thanks a million!

                  Giovanna



                  --- In Italian_Rennaissance_Costuming@yahoogroups.com, Mary Bader
                  Montgomery <marytaran@v...> wrote:
                  > At 10:38 PM 7/3/03 +0000, you wrote:
                  > >How would the name Giovanna Vernaccia be pronounced in 1470
                  > >Florence? I hate to not be able to say my own name!
                  > >
                  > >Giovanna
                  >
                  > "Jo-VON-na Vair-NOTCH-ya"
                  >
                  > Mary Taran
                  > Who spent a full year studying medieval and Renaissance art at the
                  > Universita degli Studi di Firenze and was a founding member of what
                  > eventually became Drachenwald. Yes, that was fabulous.
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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