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Regalvanizing Chain - Info

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  • Slip Away - Rich & Jan
    Hi All, Slip Away is currently in a boatyard in New Zealand doing a bit of refit, and a lot of general projects for a few months. One of those tasks is
    Message 1 of 5 , Dec 10, 2012
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      Hi All,

       

      Slip Away is currently in a boatyard in New Zealand doing a bit of refit, and a lot of general projects for a few months.  One of those tasks is getting our anchor chain regalvanized, along with our anchor.  For background, we have 3/8” Proof Coil Chain and a 66# Bruce Anchor.  The chain was purchased in Oriental, North Carolina about four years ago.  Neither the chain or the anchor have been regalvanized previously.

       

      As an additional note, I was very disappointed in the chain I bought in Oriental, NC.  The yard I was in has a good reputation, and I wanted to make sure I didn’t get chain that was manufactured in China.  This chain was made in the USA, so I thought it would be fine.  On the plus side, it has held us secure at anchor for the past four years, so that’s good.  But after about 12-18 months it started to rust, and by 24 months was quite rusty.  Clearly the galvanizing was not done as well as I’d have liked.

       

      With all that as background, there was a guy in the boatyard today who was consulting with another owner regarding his chain, and I had the opportunity to visit with him for a bit.  He was VERY knowledgeable regarding anchor chain, it’s strength properties, effects of regalvanizing, etc.  His company has a website, and he’s written some articles regarding this subject.  Rather than try to regurgitate all he passed on to me, here’s the link to his articles.  Hope you find it useful:

      http://www.chainsropesandanchors.co.nz/advice/regalvanise/

       

      If you have other questions not addressed in his articles, let me know, and perhaps I can pass on any info he didn’t include in these articles.

       

      Cheers,

      Rich

      s.v. Slip Away

      in Whangarei, New Zealand

    • kline
      Since the subject of anchor & chain came up, I need to ask some questions. How much anchor is enough? How much chain? Now let me say this. Revelation has a
      Message 2 of 5 , Dec 11, 2012
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        Since the subject of anchor & chain came up, I need to ask some questions. How much anchor is enough? How much chain? Now let me say this. “Revelation” has a #35 CQR & about 15’ of chain. I believe this is too small & too short but does pass some of the general rules for anchoring. The boat is still in the project stage but before I leave the dock under my own power I want to know if she’ll stay put. If I have anchor somewhere “out there.” Also, I don’t have a windlass so I’d like some general info on windlass size, power, working load, etc.  My plan is to head to the Carribean when I cast off. Also, has anyone cut out the deck to make a chain locker? Any pics of the project?

         

        Tony

         

        From: IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com [mailto:IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Slip Away - Rich & Jan
        Sent: Tuesday, December 11, 2012 12:43 AM
        To: Islander Freeport 41 Group
        Subject: [IslanderFreeport41] Regalvanizing Chain - Info

         

         

        Hi All,

         

        Slip Away is currently in a boatyard in New Zealand doing a bit of refit, and a lot of general projects for a few months.  One of those tasks is getting our anchor chain regalvanized, along with our anchor.  For background, we have 3/8” Proof Coil Chain and a 66# Bruce Anchor.  The chain was purchased in Oriental, North Carolina about four years ago.  Neither the chain or the anchor have been regalvanized previously.

         

        As an additional note, I was very disappointed in the chain I bought in Oriental, NC.  The yard I was in has a good reputation, and I wanted to make sure I didn’t get chain that was manufactured in China.  This chain was made in the USA, so I thought it would be fine.  On the plus side, it has held us secure at anchor for the past four years, so that’s good.  But after about 12-18 months it started to rust, and by 24 months was quite rusty.  Clearly the galvanizing was not done as well as I’d have liked.

         

        With all that as background, there was a guy in the boatyard today who was consulting with another owner regarding his chain, and I had the opportunity to visit with him for a bit.  He was VERY knowledgeable regarding anchor chain, it’s strength properties, effects of regalvanizing, etc.  His company has a website, and he’s written some articles regarding this subject.  Rather than try to regurgitate all he passed on to me, here’s the link to his articles.  Hope you find it useful:

        http://www.chainsropesandanchors.co.nz/advice/regalvanise/

         

        If you have other questions not addressed in his articles, let me know, and perhaps I can pass on any info he didn’t include in these articles.

         

        Cheers,

        Rich

        s.v. Slip Away

        in Whangarei, New Zealand

      • Steven Ellsworth
        Good questions Tony! Rich may have the best ultimate answer but we are closer to the edge so may be relevant. We have a 45 lb cqr. It s the primary and works
        Message 3 of 5 , Dec 11, 2012
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          Good questions Tony! Rich may have the best ultimate answer but we are closer to the edge so may be relevant. We have a 45 lb cqr. It's the primary and works most times. We don't drag, but we get up and motor slowly forward to keep the strain off. I'd like a bigger one. 

          We also have a 35 lb Bruce. It's worthless as anything but a lunch hook If you stay on the boat. I'd like Rich's 66. 

          As for chain, we have 400' on board with the cqr. It came with the boat and is enough. 200' is probably enough combined with 200' of 5/8 rode. 

          We have a vertical ideal windlass. Don't leave home without one. I'd prefer a horizontal though. Better for raising and lowering dinghy and going up the mast. 

          Hope this helps!

          Steven M. Ellsworth
          Catalina Oil Properties
          PO Box 2468
          Edmond,OK 73083
          405-517-7243 

          On Dec 11, 2012, at 7:07 PM, "kline" <baka@...> wrote:

           

          Since the subject of anchor & chain came up, I need to ask some questions. How much anchor is enough? How much chain? Now let me say this. “Revelation” has a #35 CQR & about 15’ of chain. I believe this is too small & too short but does pass some of the general rules for anchoring. The boat is still in the project stage but before I leave the dock under my own power I want to know if she’ll stay put. If I have anchor somewhere “out there.” Also, I don’t have a windlass so I’d like some general info on windlass size, power, working load, etc.  My plan is to head to the Carribean when I cast off. Also, has anyone cut out the deck to make a chain locker? Any pics of the project?

           

          Tony

           

          From: IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com [mailto:IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Slip Away - Rich & Jan
          Sent: Tuesday, December 11, 2012 12:43 AM
          To: Islander Freeport 41 Group
          Subject: [IslanderFreeport41] Regalvanizing Chain - Info

           

           

          Hi All,

           

          Slip Away is currently in a boatyard in New Zealand doing a bit of refit, and a lot of general projects for a few months.  One of those tasks is getting our anchor chain regalvanized, along with our anchor.  For background, we have 3/8” Proof Coil Chain and a 66# Bruce Anchor.  The chain was purchased in Oriental, North Carolina about four years ago.  Neither the chain or the anchor have been regalvanized previously.

           

          As an additional note, I was very disappointed in the chain I bought in Oriental, NC.  The yard I was in has a good reputation, and I wanted to make sure I didn’t get chain that was manufactured in China.  This chain was made in the USA, so I thought it would be fine.  On the plus side, it has held us secure at anchor for the past four years, so that’s good.  But after about 12-18 months it started to rust, and by 24 months was quite rusty.  Clearly the galvanizing was not done as well as I’d have liked.

           

          With all that as background, there was a guy in the boatyard today who was consulting with another owner regarding his chain, and I had the opportunity to visit with him for a bit.  He was VERY knowledgeable regarding anchor chain, it’s strength properties, effects of regalvanizing, etc.  His company has a website, and he’s written some articles regarding this subject.  Rather than try to regurgitate all he passed on to me, here’s the link to his articles.  Hope you find it useful:

          http://www.chainsropesandanchors.co.nz/advice/regalvanise/

           

          If you have other questions not addressed in his articles, let me know, and perhaps I can pass on any info he didn’t include in these articles.

           

          Cheers,

          Rich

          s.v. Slip Away

          in Whangarei, New Zealand

        • Kallberg, Ralph T
          I would suggest that if you are going into the Caribbean, you get all chain, the rode could get cut with the coral down there. Also the IF 41 is a big boat
          Message 4 of 5 , Dec 12, 2012
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            I would suggest that if you are going into the Caribbean, you get all chain, the rode could get cut with the coral down there.

            Also the IF 41 is a big boat with a lot of windage. In the Caribbean you will get the reinforced trade winds which create a huge load on the anchor.

             

            I’m with big and heavy – it helps you sleep at night.

            Fortuitous has the same primary anchor as Slip Away, a  66 lb Bruce, and 300 feet of 5/16 HT chain. This combo has worked very well for us and I don’t ever recall dragging.

            We also have on the bowsprit, a 60 lb CQR with 30 feet of 3/8 chain and 300 feet of ¾ inch rode (haven’t had to use it yet but it is ready to deploy).

            We have a vertical windlass which is mandatory with all that chain. All that weight in the bow does not seem to be a problem.

             

            A good anchoring system is cheap insurance!

             

            Ralph

            s/v Fortuitous

            in the Rio Dulce, Guatemala

             

            From: IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com [mailto:IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Steven Ellsworth
            Sent: Tuesday, December 11, 2012 10:16 PM
            To: IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [IslanderFreeport41] Regalvanizing Chain - Info

             

             

            Good questions Tony! Rich may have the best ultimate answer but we are closer to the edge so may be relevant. We have a 45 lb cqr. It's the primary and works most times. We don't drag, but we get up and motor slowly forward to keep the strain off. I'd like a bigger one. 

             

            We also have a 35 lb Bruce. It's worthless as anything but a lunch hook If you stay on the boat. I'd like Rich's 66. 

             

            As for chain, we have 400' on board with the cqr. It came with the boat and is enough. 200' is probably enough combined with 200' of 5/8 rode. 

             

            We have a vertical ideal windlass. Don't leave home without one. I'd prefer a horizontal though. Better for raising and lowering dinghy and going up the mast. 

             

            Hope this helps!

            Steven M. Ellsworth

            Catalina Oil Properties

            PO Box 2468

            Edmond,OK 73083

            405-517-7243 


            On Dec 11, 2012, at 7:07 PM, "kline" <baka@...> wrote:

             

            Since the subject of anchor & chain came up, I need to ask some questions. How much anchor is enough? How much chain? Now let me say this. “Revelation” has a #35 CQR & about 15’ of chain. I believe this is too small & too short but does pass some of the general rules for anchoring. The boat is still in the project stage but before I leave the dock under my own power I want to know if she’ll stay put. If I have anchor somewhere “out there.” Also, I don’t have a windlass so I’d like some general info on windlass size, power, working load, etc.  My plan is to head to the Carribean when I cast off. Also, has anyone cut out the deck to make a chain locker? Any pics of the project?

             

            Tony

             

            From: IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com [mailto:IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Slip Away - Rich & Jan
            Sent: Tuesday, December 11, 2012 12:43 AM
            To: Islander Freeport 41 Group
            Subject: [IslanderFreeport41] Regalvanizing Chain - Info

             

             

            Hi All,

             

            Slip Away is currently in a boatyard in New Zealand doing a bit of refit, and a lot of general projects for a few months.  One of those tasks is getting our anchor chain regalvanized, along with our anchor.  For background, we have 3/8” Proof Coil Chain and a 66# Bruce Anchor.  The chain was purchased in Oriental, North Carolina about four years ago.  Neither the chain or the anchor have been regalvanized previously.

             

            As an additional note, I was very disappointed in the chain I bought in Oriental, NC.  The yard I was in has a good reputation, and I wanted to make sure I didn’t get chain that was manufactured in China.  This chain was made in the USA, so I thought it would be fine.  On the plus side, it has held us secure at anchor for the past four years, so that’s good.  But after about 12-18 months it started to rust, and by 24 months was quite rusty.  Clearly the galvanizing was not done as well as I’d have liked.

             

            With all that as background, there was a guy in the boatyard today who was consulting with another owner regarding his chain, and I had the opportunity to visit with him for a bit.  He was VERY knowledgeable regarding anchor chain, it’s strength properties, effects of regalvanizing, etc.  His company has a website, and he’s written some articles regarding this subject.  Rather than try to regurgitate all he passed on to me, here’s the link to his articles.  Hope you find it useful:

            http://www.chainsropesandanchors.co.nz/advice/regalvanise/

             

            If you have other questions not addressed in his articles, let me know, and perhaps I can pass on any info he didn’t include in these articles.

             

            Cheers,

            Rich

            s.v. Slip Away

            in Whangarei, New Zealand



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          • Slip Away - Rich & Jan
            Hi Tony, Ralph and Steve’s comments below are pretty much spot on as far as our experience on Slip Away goes. Slip Away came with a 44# Bruce when we bought
            Message 5 of 5 , Dec 13, 2012
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              Hi Tony,

               

              Ralph and Steve’s comments below are pretty much spot on as far as our experience on Slip Away goes.  Slip Away came with a 44# Bruce when we bought her, and during a year of refit in Los Angeles at a dock, the anchor kept looking smaller and smaller to me.  So we sold it at Minneys and bought a 66# one.  It’s none too big; in fact I would like a bigger one.  Unlike Ralph and Cheryl on Fortuitous, we have dragged a few times.  But always when the wind came up, and usually when it switched 180 degrees.  Another time was in Cape May, NJ in 67 knots of wind, but once I put out ALL our chain we held just fine.

               

              We have about 320 feet of 3/8 inch chain and NO ROPE rode.  Unless you’re only anchoring in lakes with sandy or muddy bottoms, I can’t understand why anyone would ever use rope.  And as Ralph points out, the Caribbean is full of coral.  I watched a boat with new cruisers and ¾” rope rode have their line chafe thru in coral in about 40 minutes with high winds and a chop/swell in the anchorage.  Fortunately they were awake and watching, so got to keep their boat.  If we see anyone anchoring near us with rope, we move, as they’re a danger to us as well as themselves.

               

              Tony, with regard to how much chain you need, it depends on where you are going.  The IF41 draws 5 feet, so to have a 7:1 scope in water that is 10 feet deep, you need 105 feet of chain (10 feet of depth plus 5 feet to the bowsprit (freeboard) = 15 feet X 7).  Lots of people use less, but you compromise your security by doing so.  In one anchorage in Bora Bora, we had to anchor in 90 feet.  We put all 320 feet out, but still only had about 3:1 scope.  In that case, a big heavy chain also helps.  Keep in mind, if you go places with mooring balls, and want to anchor (like Catalina Island in CA or the Eastern Caribbean), the mooring balls are in the best anchoring spots.  You’ll end up anchoring in much deeper water than you’d like.

               

              Like Ralph says, they’re big boats with lots of windage, so the bigger the anchor and heavier the chain, the more secure you’ll be.

               

              Regarding windlasses, as others said, it’ll be much better to have a good one.  Raising ground tackle manually, as heavy as our is, is quite a chore.  And if it’s not easy to do, you’ll be reluctant to reanchor when you’re unsure of how good your set is, or don’t like where the boat is positioned.  We installed a Lofrans horizontal windlass about three years ago and like it.  But there are a number of other good ones on the market.  Again, better to go one size larger than recommended for your ground tackle, so you have sufficient power when you need it.

               

              Last comment on anchors.  We use a 66# Bruce as primary, have a 45# CQR as secondary, a large Fortress as a storm anchor we keep disassembled in the cockpit lazarette, and a Danforth as a stern anchor.  We have not used the CQR or Fortress to date.  When we were setting up the boat in 2003, I pretty much knew nothing about anchoring.  I relied on the SSCA Equipment survey at the time, which indicated that the most popular anchor chosen by cruisers was the Bruce, with the CQR a close second.  Though the Bruce has served us well, there is an anchor that wasn’t available back then called a Rocna that I would choose today.  They outperform most other anchors in tests, have become very popular with cruisers today, and are excellent anchors.  They are particularly good at re-setting when the wind switches 180 degrees.  If I had the money or lost our Bruce, I’d buy a Rocna.  Second choice would be a Manson, which is similar to the Rocna, and also an excellent anchor.

               

              An anchor I’ve never used, but would not have on board is the Delta.  I’m sure this is going to annoy someone as anchor selection is somewhat akin to religion selection, but it is the anchor I’ve seen dragging most often.  If a boat is dragging in an anchorage, seems like 50% or more of the time they’re using a Delta or similar spade type anchor.  But if it’s a choice between a Delta or using rope road, I’d choose the Delta and just make sure I had a good anchor alarm and was always awake if the winds got over 20 knots.

               

              Oh well, enough of this for now.  All the best to everyone,

              Rich

              s.v. Slip Away

              in Whangarei, New Zealand

               

               

              From: IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com [mailto:IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kallberg, Ralph T
              Sent: Thursday, December 13, 2012 12:22 AM
              To: IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [IslanderFreeport41] Regalvanizing Chain - Info

               

               

              I would suggest that if you are going into the Caribbean, you get all chain, the rode could get cut with the coral down there.

              Also the IF 41 is a big boat with a lot of windage. In the Caribbean you will get the reinforced trade winds which create a huge load on the anchor.

               

              I’m with big and heavy – it helps you sleep at night.

              Fortuitous has the same primary anchor as Slip Away, a  66 lb. Bruce, and 300 feet of 5/16 HT chain. This combo has worked very well for us and I don’t ever recall dragging.

              We also have on the bowsprit, a 60 lb. CQR with 30 feet of 3/8 chain and 300 feet of ¾ inch rode (haven’t had to use it yet but it is ready to deploy).

              We have a vertical windlass which is mandatory with all that chain. All that weight in the bow does not seem to be a problem.

               

              A good anchoring system is cheap insurance!

               

              Ralph

              s/v Fortuitous

              in the Rio Dulce, Guatemala

               

              From: IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com [mailto:IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Steven Ellsworth
              Sent: Tuesday, December 11, 2012 10:16 PM
              To:
              IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [IslanderFreeport41] Regalvanizing Chain - Info

               

               

              Good questions Tony! Rich may have the best ultimate answer but we are closer to the edge so may be relevant. We have a 45 lb cqr. It's the primary and works most times. We don't drag, but we get up and motor slowly forward to keep the strain off. I'd like a bigger one. 

               

              We also have a 35 lb Bruce. It's worthless as anything but a lunch hook If you stay on the boat. I'd like Rich's 66. 

               

              As for chain, we have 400' on board with the cqr. It came with the boat and is enough. 200' is probably enough combined with 200' of 5/8 rode. 

               

              We have a vertical ideal windlass. Don't leave home without one. I'd prefer a horizontal though. Better for raising and lowering dinghy and going up the mast. 

               

              Hope this helps!

              Steven M. Ellsworth

              Catalina Oil Properties

              PO Box 2468

              Edmond,OK 73083

              405-517-7243 


              On Dec 11, 2012, at 7:07 PM, "kline" <baka@...> wrote:

               

              Since the subject of anchor & chain came up, I need to ask some questions. How much anchor is enough? How much chain? Now let me say this. “Revelation” has a #35 CQR & about 15’ of chain. I believe this is too small & too short but does pass some of the general rules for anchoring. The boat is still in the project stage but before I leave the dock under my own power I want to know if she’ll stay put. If I have anchor somewhere “out there.” Also, I don’t have a windlass so I’d like some general info on windlass size, power, working load, etc.  My plan is to head to the Carribean when I cast off. Also, has anyone cut out the deck to make a chain locker? Any pics of the project?

               

              Tony

               

              From: IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com [mailto:IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Slip Away - Rich & Jan
              Sent: Tuesday, December 11, 2012 12:43 AM
              To: Islander Freeport 41 Group
              Subject: [IslanderFreeport41] Regalvanizing Chain - Info

               

               

              Hi All,

               

              Slip Away is currently in a boatyard in New Zealand doing a bit of refit, and a lot of general projects for a few months.  One of those tasks is getting our anchor chain regalvanized, along with our anchor.  For background, we have 3/8” Proof Coil Chain and a 66# Bruce Anchor.  The chain was purchased in Oriental, North Carolina about four years ago.  Neither the chain or the anchor have been regalvanized previously.

               

              As an additional note, I was very disappointed in the chain I bought in Oriental, NC.  The yard I was in has a good reputation, and I wanted to make sure I didn’t get chain that was manufactured in China.  This chain was made in the USA, so I thought it would be fine.  On the plus side, it has held us secure at anchor for the past four years, so that’s good.  But after about 12-18 months it started to rust, and by 24 months was quite rusty.  Clearly the galvanizing was not done as well as I’d have liked.

               

              With all that as background, there was a guy in the boatyard today who was consulting with another owner regarding his chain, and I had the opportunity to visit with him for a bit.  He was VERY knowledgeable regarding anchor chain, it’s strength properties, effects of regalvanizing, etc.  His company has a website, and he’s written some articles regarding this subject.  Rather than try to regurgitate all he passed on to me, here’s the link to his articles.  Hope you find it useful:

              http://www.chainsropesandanchors.co.nz/advice/regalvanise/

               

              If you have other questions not addressed in his articles, let me know, and perhaps I can pass on any info he didn’t include in these articles.

               

              Cheers,

              Rich

              s.v. Slip Away

              in Whangarei, New Zealand

               


              The information contained in this e-mail is intended only for the individual or entity to whom it is addressed.
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              If you are not an intended recipient you must not use, disclose, disseminate, copy or print its contents.
              If you receive this e-mail in error, please notify the sender by reply e-mail and delete and destroy the message.

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