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Re: Docking

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  • Bri
    S/V ECHO I have been single handing for the last 8 months from SF to Guaymas Mexico. I generally do not have anyone on the dock because it is too hot. So
    Message 1 of 15 , Aug 4, 2010
      S/V ECHO
      I have been single handing for the last 8 months from SF to Guaymas Mexico. I generally do not have anyone on the dock because it is too hot. So what I do is is attach a spring line to a midships cleat, make a loop and then take a few turns on the main winch. When approaching the dock I loop the line over the center cleat at the dock. This makes me "fast" to the dock. I can then winch myself in if there is a crosswind. Once alongside the dock I use extra long dock lines I have run to the cockpit. I then jump off the boat and secure the fwd line. From there it is only a matter of getting her positioned right. Pulling out is just the reverse.
      As far as steering I have found that she steers in reverse OK if over one knot. When pulling out I give a burst in reverse to get her moving and then neutral to stop the prop walk. Some times the bow will move over and need correcting. I have found a short burst fwd with the rudder hard over will bring the bow around and the stern in the right direction. You have to make the fwd burst less than the reverse burst or the boat will stop. You may need another short burst in reverse to get speed up to over a knot where you will have steerage
      When coasting at over a knot do not make hard turns. If you go hard over the rudder acts like a brake, slows the boat and you loose steerage. If backing into a wind or need more speed with the prop I found it take from 10 to 12 degrees of rudder opposite to the prop walk to go straight in reverse. The boat turns easily in the direction of prop walk but not so good against the prop walk. So out of gear for turns that way.
      I have danced my way through a lot of tight places this way,
      Michael Bereznai,
      S/V ECHO
      echosailor@...


      --- In IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com, rcdoty9816@... wrote:
      >
      >
      > I sure agree with you on the rub rails. I added them to Pretty Penny and they work great to protect those fat sides. I think they look real good on the IF41. When I first did mine I had them running too far forward and the front end of the rails started to look like skies. Had to remove the forward 3 feet before they look right.
      > Cheers
      > Skip
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Steven Ellsworth <stevenellsworth@...>
      > To: IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com
      > Sent: Mon, Jul 26, 2010 6:48 pm
      > Subject: Re: [IslanderFreeport41] Docking
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Skip:
      >
      > Good comments. I am too. It usually works best for me to loop the lines around the dock pilings/cleats and cleat both free ends to the boat or cleat one and hold one. Mostly they let go from the dock. If they don't, I look like a fool.
      >
      > The other key ingredient is to have robust rub rails made for the "fat" sides of our boats. I added those and they take a lot of abuse. Saves my expensive paint job though. I am also adding stainless rails right under the top stripe where the bow starts to overhang the sides. Got a nasty scrape there and want to a.) cover it up and b.) keep it from happening again and elsewhere.
      >
      > From the comments, we're all in the same boat. (HaHa)
      >
      > Great comments from all,
      >
      > Steve
      >
      > --- On Mon, 7/26/10, rcdoty9816@... <rcdoty9816@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > From: rcdoty9816@... <rcdoty9816@...>
      > Subject: Re: [IslanderFreeport41] Docking
      > To: IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Monday, July 26, 2010, 6:30 PM
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Practice with no one around. Throw out a marker in open water and back up to it, take in on p/s and bow on. Try it a few time in different weather conditions. Using lines (wraps) to control the boat is an art and works great. Its nice if you are short handed to double back the lines so they can be removed from the dock by someone on the boat. I am always short handed. Mostly I just close my eyes and pray real hard. Ha
      > Cheers.
      > Skip and Paula
      > Pretty Penny
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Don <dgrass1@cox. net>
      > To: IslanderFreeport41@ yahoogroups. com
      > Sent: Mon, Jul 26, 2010 2:37 am
      > Subject: Re: [IslanderFreeport41 ] Docking
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > I've used a spring line on a amidships deck cleat to a dock stern cleat a few times, and with the rudder in the right position with a slight amount of power it brings the boat right up to the dock...but you have to make your approach very slow to get the line around the stern dock cleat.
      >
      > Don
      > s/v Grasshopper #130
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Dick Pluta
      > To: IslanderFreeport41@ yahoogroups. com
      > Sent: Sunday, July 25, 2010 9:51 PM
      > Subject: Re: [IslanderFreeport41 ] Docking
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Manouvering with warps is an art that deserves some attention. I have always been impressed by the vaporetto pilots in Venice. Using only one amidship warp they lay those boats alongside the docks every five minutes or so and hold them perfectly while passengers board. Of course, that's in a perfectly still canal but it's still impressive.
      >
      > Here's a web site with a discussion of docking with waprs. It's for a trawler but the fundamentals still apply.
      >
      > Dick
      >
      >
      > On Mon, Jul 26, 2010 at 6:09 AM, peter lorenz <petertl55@hotmail. com> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > I am so impressed that all who are in this site are so helpfull to each other.
      > I learn so much, just from the questions of others.
      > This is what sailing, and community, is all about. Peter
      >
      > To: IslanderFreeport41@ yahoogroups. com
      > From: dgrass1@cox. net
      > Date: Sun, 25 Jul 2010 17:41:37 -0700
      > Subject: Re: [IslanderFreeport41 ] Docking
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > I thought my IF36 was a bear to back up, but now I guess it's not compared to the IF41.
      >
      > Many of you may know these techniques, but maybe some of you do not.
      >
      > I have one thing you can try when pinned to your end tie. Keep the bow line wrapped around the forward dock cleat (someone is holding this line on the boat), put the transmission into forward with the rudder turned to starboard. The forward line on the dock won't let the boat go forward very far, then the stern of the boat is forced outward to port. The longer you drive the boat forward against the line, the more the stern moves to port. Once your stern is out where you want it, cast off the line from the dock cleat and put transmission in reverse with power. This will pull you away from the dock to a point where you safely change gear and power to forward. You can do the same procedure with the stern line wrapped around a stern deck cleat, but this time putting the transmission in reverse forcing the bow outward away from the dock. I use these techniques often at end tie or side tie pump out and fueling docks.
      >
      > This one I learned on my own after having to deal with a double slip I had, where our boat was the upwind side of a sideways to the wind double slip...really sucked.
      > There's another technique I've used when getting out of a double slip, when I want the stern of the boat to go to port. Take the bow line and wrap it around a mid dock cleat (someone is holding this line on the boat), as the boat moves out of the slip in reverse, pull in the slack of the bow line keeping the bow of the boat close to the dock. This procedure lets the stern turn slowly to port, while keeping the bow to the dock. Once the bow is at the mid dock cleat, cast off the line from the mid dock cleat. The stern of the boat will be far enough to port by then, to allow you to finish your turning out into the fairway. Once far enough out, put the boat in forward and go.
      >
      > Don
      > s/v Grasshopper #130
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: xjellisx
      > To: IslanderFreeport41@ yahoogroups. com
      > Sent: Sunday, July 25, 2010 4:32 PM
      > Subject: [IslanderFreeport41 ] Docking
      >
      >
      >
      > Thanks everyone. I don't ever remember giving a second thought to docking in any other boat I've owned, but this FP41 has me bumfuzzled.. . Guess part of the problem is she's birthed in SF Bay where a 5 knot current and 35 knot breeze is just an average day on the farm. I agree that in still conditions using the right hand torque in reverse and forward prop wash over the rudder you can turn tight 360's all day long. I just wish I could figure a way to get her to back to port when trying to get away from a side tie dock where the wind and current has you pinned without scaring half the marina to death - or, are all those little heads supposed to start popping out of hatch covers whenever one leaves... lol.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Practice with no one around. Throw out a marker in open water and back up to it, take in on p/s and bow on. Try it a few time in different weather conditions. Using lines (wraps) to control the boat is an art and works great. Its nice if you are short handed to double back the lines so they can be removed from the dock by someone on the boat. I am always short handed. Mostly I just close my eyes and pray real hard. Ha
      > Cheers.
      > Skip and Paula
      > Pretty Penny
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Don <dgrass1@cox. net>
      > To: IslanderFreeport41@ yahoogroups. com
      > Sent: Mon, Jul 26, 2010 2:37 am
      > Subject: Re: [IslanderFreeport41 ] Docking
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > I've used a spring line on a amidships deck cleat to a dock stern cleat a few times, and with the rudder in the right position with a slight amount of power it brings the boat right up to the dock...but you have to make your approach very slow to get the line around the stern dock cleat.
      >
      > Don
      > s/v Grasshopper #130
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: Dick Pluta
      > To: IslanderFreeport41@ yahoogroups. com
      > Sent: Sunday, July 25, 2010 9:51 PM
      > Subject: Re: [IslanderFreeport41 ] Docking
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Manouvering with warps is an art that deserves some attention. I have always been impressed by the vaporetto pilots in Venice. Using only one amidship warp they lay those boats alongside the docks every five minutes or so and hold them perfectly while passengers board. Of course, that's in a perfectly still canal but it's still impressive.
      >
      > Here's a web site with a discussion of docking with waprs. It's for a trawler but the fundamentals still apply.
      >
      > Dick
      >
      >
      > On Mon, Jul 26, 2010 at 6:09 AM, peter lorenz <petertl55@hotmail. com> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > I am so impressed that all who are in this site are so helpfull to each other.
      > I learn so much, just from the questions of others.
      > This is what sailing, and community, is all about. Peter
      >
      > To: IslanderFreeport41@ yahoogroups. com
      > From: dgrass1@cox. net
      > Date: Sun, 25 Jul 2010 17:41:37 -0700
      > Subject: Re: [IslanderFreeport41 ] Docking
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > I thought my IF36 was a bear to back up, but now I guess it's not compared to the IF41.
      >
      > Many of you may know these techniques, but maybe some of you do not.
      >
      > I have one thing you can try when pinned to your end tie. Keep the bow line wrapped around the forward dock cleat (someone is holding this line on the boat), put the transmission into forward with the rudder turned to starboard. The forward line on the dock won't let the boat go forward very far, then the stern of the boat is forced outward to port. The longer you drive the boat forward against the line, the more the stern moves to port. Once your stern is out where you want it, cast off the line from the dock cleat and put transmission in reverse with power. This will pull you away from the dock to a point where you safely change gear and power to forward. You can do the same procedure with the stern line wrapped around a stern deck cleat, but this time putting the transmission in reverse forcing the bow outward away from the dock. I use these techniques often at end tie or side tie pump out and fueling docks.
      >
      > This one I learned on my own after having to deal with a double slip I had, where our boat was the upwind side of a sideways to the wind double slip...really sucked.
      > There's another technique I've used when getting out of a double slip, when I want the stern of the boat to go to port. Take the bow line and wrap it around a mid dock cleat (someone is holding this line on the boat), as the boat moves out of the slip in reverse, pull in the slack of the bow line keeping the bow of the boat close to the dock. This procedure lets the stern turn slowly to port, while keeping the bow to the dock. Once the bow is at the mid dock cleat, cast off the line from the mid dock cleat. The stern of the boat will be far enough to port by then, to allow you to finish your turning out into the fairway. Once far enough out, put the boat in forward and go.
      >
      > Don
      > s/v Grasshopper #130
      >
      >
      > ----- Original Message -----
      > From: xjellisx
      > To: IslanderFreeport41@ yahoogroups. com
      > Sent: Sunday, July 25, 2010 4:32 PM
      > Subject: [IslanderFreeport41 ] Docking
      >
      >
      >
      > Thanks everyone. I don't ever remember giving a second thought to docking in any other boat I've owned, but this FP41 has me bumfuzzled.. . Guess part of the problem is she's birthed in SF Bay where a 5 knot current and 35 knot breeze is just an average day on the farm. I agree that in still conditions using the right hand torque in reverse and forward prop wash over the rudder you can turn tight 360's all day long. I just wish I could figure a way to get her to back to port when trying to get away from a side tie dock where the wind and current has you pinned without scaring half the marina to death - or, are all those little heads supposed to start popping out of hatch covers whenever one leaves... lol.
      >
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