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Re: [IslanderFreeport41] What amount of amp hours in your house bank?

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  • Dan Dionne
    Brad, We have an early 1976 IF41 in Alameda, CA and we replaced our house bank with (6) 6-volt 256 amp Gel Cells for a total of 1536 amp/hrs.  We also
    Message 1 of 18 , Jul 2, 2008

      Brad,

       

      We have an early 1976 IF41 in Alameda, CA and we replaced our house bank with (6) 6-volt 256 amp Gel Cells for a total of 1536 amp/hrs.  We also installed the Freedom 25 inverter/charger with the Link2000 controller and I absolutely love this system.  We replaced the 45 amp engine generator with a 150 amp gen and added the Belmar electronic regulator.  I know we spent a few extra bucks on this system, but it is well worth it.  Like Scott, we placed our batteries under the main salon seatee and mounted the inverter on the engine room wall behind the batteries, so the distance to the charger is very close.  Our electrical panel switches were getting worn out, so we replaced them with a Blue Sea panel and switches.  I'm in the process of replacing the outlets wiring and light fixtures wiring.

       

      Good luck,

       

      Kimmy & Dan

      "Rayelle"

      ----- Original Message ----
      From: BRAD DESTACHE <brad@...>
      To: IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, June 29, 2008 8:31:03 PM
      Subject: [IslanderFreeport41] What amount of amp hours in your house bank?

      Hello,

      Niki and I have just taken over an I.F. 41 here in San Diego. She is
      a 1976 era and well worn out. My first list of items to tackle, as
      we live on a mooring, is the mechanicals, electrical, and plumbing.
      Well I figured Niki deserved to have at least one new head in the
      boat so I went right at that and replaced the forward head systems.
      A week ago I went through the engine and made sure that it was going
      to start on a regular basis, unfortunatly it requires starting fluid
      unless it has been running already. This could be due to the poor
      condition of the fuel lines and a leaking outboard primer bulb not
      alowing the engines fuel system to stay free of air. I am a factory
      trained Yanmar mechanic so look for my repower when funds allow.
      To digress, we are now starting to sort out our batteries or lack
      there of and was wondering what most of you have as far as house bank
      amp capacity? This info would be really nice from folks who have
      kept most of the standard systems. If you have been running your
      washer and dryer, trash compactor, or garbage disposal off your
      inverter you must have a really big bank that I might not be able to
      afford, lol.
      Anyway this is great to have such a well put together group of owners
      and look forward to gleening some information as well as helping out
      in any way I can.

      Brad, Niki, and Bernard(the cat)
      Western Yacht Commissioning

      S/V BIG TUNA
      (formerly S/V KATHTHEA)


    • Tom
      Brad: On our IF-41 Waverley , we have four six volt, wet cell golf cart batteries for the house, and a Group 31 for the engine. House batteries total 440
      Message 2 of 18 , Jul 3, 2008
        Brad:

        On our IF-41 "Waverley", we have four six volt, wet cell  "golf cart" batteries for the house, and a Group 31 for the engine.  House batteries total 440 Amps. Keeping in mind that you really only get to use 40% of this amperage, that gives us about 180 usable amps.  I plan on installing a solar panel or two for those nice sunny anchorages in Mexico.  Enough solar power to power your refer and you're all set. 

        Golf-cart batteries are great.  They have thick plates specifically designed for daily discharge and recharge.   And being an automotive product they do not cost boat prices. 

        We have a 2500 watt MAGNUM inverter/charger aboard, and a blue seas panel with digital amp and volt meters. 

        Our engine (Volvo D2-75) came with a 125 amp alternator.

        The batteries above cost $500, which is the cheap part.  The inverter cost $4,000 installed (great product) and the blue seas panel and meters cost $1200, installed by me.  That's expensive enough for my budget. 

        We removed the noisy, smelly ONAN generator and put the batteries where it had been.  Very quiet generator now. 

        The generator removal also gained me an exhaust thruhull which I have used to install an extra 4000 GPH bilge pump.  Most boats are woefully under-equipped with bilge pumps...we now have 7000 GPH aboard and I'm still feeling insecure.  Two x 1000 GPH shower sump pumps might be enough. 

        I'm headed your way next month (August), from Seattle to San Diego, bound for Mexico.  Going south with the Baja Haha. 

        Good luck with the new boat. 


        TOM DALGLIESH





        ----- Original Message ----
        From: BRAD DESTACHE <brad@...>
        To: IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sunday, June 29, 2008 8:31:03 PM
        Subject: [IslanderFreeport41] What amount of amp hours in your house bank?

        Hello, 

        Niki and I have just taken over an I.F. 41 here in San Diego. She is 
        a 1976 era and well worn out. My first list of items to tackle, as 
        we live on a mooring, is the mechanicals, electrical, and plumbing. 
        Well I figured Niki deserved to have at least one new head in the 
        boat so I went right at that and replaced the forward head systems. 
        A week ago I went through the engine and made sure that it was going 
        to start on a regular basis, unfortunatly it requires starting fluid 
        unless it has been running already. This could be due to the poor 
        condition of the fuel lines and a leaking outboard primer bulb not 
        alowing the engines fuel system to stay free of air. I am a factory 
        trained Yanmar mechanic so look for my repower when funds allow.
        To digress, we are now starting to sort out our batteries or lack 
        there of and was wondering what most of you have as far as house bank 
        amp capacity? This info would be really nice from folks who have 
        kept most of the standard systems. If you have been running your 
        washer and dryer, trash compactor, or garbage disposal off your 
        inverter you must have a really big bank that I might not be able to 
        afford, lol.
        Anyway this is great to have such a well put together group of owners 
        and look forward to gleening some information as well as helping out 
        in any way I can.

        Brad, Niki, and Bernard(the cat)
        Western Yacht Commissioning

        S/V BIG TUNA
        (formerly S/V KATHTHEA)



      • BRAD DESTACHE
        Great stuff, It just goes to show how many options there are out there. The common thread being self sufficiency. The last two days have been busy for us,
        Message 3 of 18 , Jul 3, 2008
          Great stuff,

          It just goes to show how many options there are out there. The
          common thread being self sufficiency. The last two days have been
          busy for us, not bernard so much. Niki got some realy good cleaning
          done and was key to airing out the engine room. We must have took
          out half a dimpster full of stuff. Then added a quarter, we rehosed
          the forward cockpit drains, removed the water/oil soaked battery box
          from in front of the engine. This last part uncovered 25 gallons of
          oily sludgy water that we had to vacuum out and then put into buckets
          for disposal.
          We tore out all of the larger battery wires, nothing smaller than
          6awg unless it was obviously not going anywere. Removing the old
          diode charger, and installing a bluesea battery relay, 300am fuse
          and holder, Xantrex Freedom 20, 3 x 4D agm batteries for the house,
          and a group 27 Optima Red top starter battery. We added to this a
          Link 20 and seperate basic remote for the Freedom 20. I would like
          to tout how it is important to keep things seperate for the sake of
          breakdowns, but really that was what I had to work with. Also like
          an idiot(and I only do this on my own boats) I landed a ground to the
          engine instead of the new ground buss that feeds the shunt to the
          link 20.
          Is is alot nicer in there now, tomorrow I will attack the aft section
          of the engine room. Replaceing the cockpit drains, redoing the head
          and shower sump plumbing.

          A tired Brad and Niki
        • Steven Ellsworth
          Been there done that, except I took out three large black plastic bags full of deadheaded wires and stuff that did not work. Incredible. Keep after it and have
          Message 4 of 18 , Jul 3, 2008
            Been there done that, except I took out three large black plastic bags full of deadheaded wires and stuff that did not work. Incredible.

            Keep after it and have fun along the way.

            Capt. Steve
            SV Destiny Oklahoma

            BRAD DESTACHE <brad@...> wrote:
            Great stuff,

            It just goes to show how many options there are out there. The
            common thread being self sufficiency. The last two days have been
            busy for us, not bernard so much. Niki got some realy good cleaning
            done and was key to airing out the engine room. We must have took
            out half a dimpster full of stuff. Then added a quarter, we rehosed
            the forward cockpit drains, removed the water/oil soaked battery box
            from in front of the engine. This last part uncovered 25 gallons of
            oily sludgy water that we had to vacuum out and then put into buckets
            for disposal.
            We tore out all of the larger battery wires, nothing smaller than
            6awg unless it was obviously not going anywere. Removing the old
            diode charger, and installing a bluesea battery relay, 300am fuse
            and holder, Xantrex Freedom 20, 3 x 4D agm batteries for the house,
            and a group 27 Optima Red top starter battery. We added to this a
            Link 20 and seperate basic remote for the Freedom 20. I would like
            to tout how it is important to keep things seperate for the sake of
            breakdowns, but really that was what I had to work with. Also like
            an idiot(and I only do this on my own boats) I landed a ground to the
            engine instead of the new ground buss that feeds the shunt to the
            link 20.
            Is is alot nicer in there now, tomorrow I will attack the aft section
            of the engine room. Replaceing the cockpit drains, redoing the head
            and shower sump plumbing.

            A tired Brad and Niki


          • Slip Away - Rich & Jan
            Hi Brad & Niki, You guys have really been working! I can t decide if it s inspirational, or if it just makes me feel guilty. Sounds like you re making some
            Message 5 of 18 , Jul 9, 2008
              Hi Brad & Niki,
               
              You guys have really been working!  I can't decide if it's inspirational, or if it just makes me feel guilty.  Sounds like you're making some great progress - from our experience, it really feels good to get 25-30 years of crud accumulation off the boat!
               
              At the end of your note you mentioned addressing the shower sump plumbing.  On Slip Away, I didn't like the shower sump arrangement - we had a little plastic box under the floor of the aft stateroom with a rule 500 in it.  The nasty shower water collected there and the Rule drained it (sort of).  Seems there was always a bit of water left over in the plastic box which did two bad things - in a rough seaway it would slosh out into the aft bilge, or else it would start to stink after a while, with regular cleaning required.  So I found a pump made by Whale (one of the few vendors that I think make really good stuff) called the "Whale Gusher".  It's made for an application like this.  The pump is plumbed into the line between the drain and the thru-hull.  Before going into the shower, turn it on (it's tolerant of running "dry"), then when done, turn it off.  No nasty shower water is left in the boat to spill, get stinky, or have to clean out.  And if you forget to turn it on before starting the shower, the shower pan starts to fill up and you can just yell to the Admiral to turn it on for you - or locate the switch within reach of the shower.
               
              That said, we almost always shower in the cockpit since it's warm where we like to go, and it keeps water on the OUTSIDE of the boat.  I have not yet plumbed a shower faucet into the cockpit, but the one I put in the shower below has a hose on the wand that is long enough to reach out the little port behind the helm seat.  It has a shutoff on the wand, and we then shower in the aft starboard area of the cockpit.  We have a small fold-up plastic stool we sit on to shower.  The advantage of this to us is that cleanup is easy and can be relatively infrequent since the scum is under the cockpit grating (Mateflex III) and invisible - but it never stinks because it dries out quickly.  We have a full cockpit enclosure too, so this even works where it's cool or if there is an uninvited audience too close.  So, in our case the "Gusher" rarely gets used - but I like it nuch better than a shower sump!
               
              Another note regarding the cockpit grate, that might be useful to others too.  When we bought Slip Away, the PO (Previous Owner - Tecate Tom) had installed carpet in the cockpit.  VERY BAD IDEA if you go to sea!  We looked into teak grating and thought it was way too expensive for our budget.  I considered "Dri-Deck", but that is too flexible and I was worried that it would move around or slip if we were in a rough seaway.  We found a product called Mateflex that we bought and installed.  I LOVE it!  It's made in 12" squares like Dri-Deck, but it is a very rigid plastic.  Jan cut it to fit in our cockpit, and it works great.  The grating is small enough that water easily passes thru but you can't see the dirt underneath - there have been times when I realized I haven't cleaned it in a while and when I finally look under it - yikes!  We choose grey, but they have other colors.  I love this stuff!  We also use it as a step-on grate outside of the cockpit coaming at the gates to catch dirt and stuff, but learned to tie the panels to the stanchions, as one got washed overboard in some rough seas off Honduras.  They even make the angled edge pieces like Dri-Deck that we used on these step-on grates.  Here's their website:  www.mateflex.com.  The product is Mateflex III.
               
              Good Luck!
              Rich
              s.v. Slip Away
              in Okracoke, NC, USA

               
               -----Original Message-----
              From: IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com [mailto:IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of BRAD DESTACHE
              Sent: Thursday, July 03, 2008 11:19 PM
              To: IslanderFreeport41@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [IslanderFreeport41] Re: What amount of amp hours in your house bank?

              Great stuff,

              It just goes to show how many options there are out there. The
              common thread being self sufficiency. The last two days have been
              busy for us, not bernard so much. Niki got some realy good cleaning
              done and was key to airing out the engine room. We must have took
              out half a dimpster full of stuff. Then added a quarter, we rehosed
              the forward cockpit drains, removed the water/oil soaked battery box
              from in front of the engine. This last part uncovered 25 gallons of
              oily sludgy water that we had to vacuum out and then put into buckets
              for disposal.
              We tore out all of the larger battery wires, nothing smaller than
              6awg unless it was obviously not going anywere. Removing the old
              diode charger, and installing a bluesea battery relay, 300am fuse
              and holder, Xantrex Freedom 20, 3 x 4D agm batteries for the house,
              and a group 27 Optima Red top starter battery. We added to this a
              Link 20 and seperate basic remote for the Freedom 20. I would like
              to tout how it is important to keep things seperate for the sake of
              breakdowns, but really that was what I had to work with. Also like
              an idiot(and I only do this on my own boats) I landed a ground to the
              engine instead of the new ground buss that feeds the shunt to the
              link 20.
              Is is alot nicer in there now, tomorrow I will attack the aft section
              of the engine room. Replaceing the cockpit drains, redoing the head
              and shower sump plumbing.

              A tired Brad and Niki

            • BRAD DESTACHE
              You know, I just installed one of those shower sump pumps on a Mason 63 and forgot to ask the owner how well it worked. I will take your advice on that. Of
              Message 6 of 18 , Jul 9, 2008
                You know, I just installed one of those shower sump pumps on a Mason
                63' and forgot to ask the owner how well it worked. I will take your
                advice on that. Of course I will have to add another breaker to the new
                panel. I think I am going to have to put a sub panel someplace for
                some stuff. I purchased two new BlueSea panels today(one 13 and the
                other 8 position) and cut a fresh backing plate of ABS to fill in the
                voids. I'll use two panels for D/C and one small for A/C. We use very
                little A/C on the boat so I only need main and four others. Anyway,
                thanks for refreshing my memory about the sump pump.


                Brad, Niki, and Bernard
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